The success of the Philadelphia Sixers rests on the shaky knees of center Andrew Bynum, who keeps hitting roadblocks in his recovery from surgery. In a highly speculative piece, the Courier-Post interviews a doctor who claims that Bynum could end up not suiting up at all this season: “The Sixers sent out a press release on Monday, Nov. 12, two days after Bynum went bowling, saying that an MRI of his right knee was performed on Nov. 5, that he was expected to return to practice by about Dec. 10, and that he would then need one to four weeks of conditioning before appearing in a game. Bynum spoke to reporters that same day, and did not mention the injured left knee. Bynum then revisited his longtime orthopedist, Dr. David W. Altchek of the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, for an MRI on his left knee later in the week, and then spoke publicly about the setback on Friday. He said he was diagnosed with a ‘mirror issue’ in his left knee, or a bone bruise identical to the one in his right knee. For the first time, he also mentioned that he had been diagnosed with weakened cartilage in both knees. Bynum revisited the issue Sunday, before the Sixers played the Cleveland Cavaliers. [...] A prominent, highly respected orthopedic surgeon who is not involved in Bynum’s treatment and has not seen his MRIs, told The News Journal that Bynum has likely been diagnosed with osteochondral lesions. The condition may heal on its own, but will likely keep Bynum from practicing until March or April, at the earliest. If it doesn’t heal, Bynum will require surgery that could sideline him for up to a year. He should find out if he needs surgery by as early as December, the surgeon said. In a brief one-on-one interview Sunday, Bynum denied that Altchek had even mentioned lesions as a potential issue. Altchek did not respond to a request for comment.”