Through three games, Derrick Rose doesn’t look like the same dominant force he was during the preseason. Rose ranks second behind Stephen Curry in turnovers per game, and often appears to be playing too fast. The Chicago Bulls say they’re not worried about the rusty start. Per the Chicago Tribune: “The Bulls are a difficult Rose game-winner away from an 0-3 start, which is indeed a small sample size. But their 1-2 opening filled with Rose’s struggles and myriad defensive breakdowns certainly supports Tom Thibodeau’s contention that work is needed via practice, practice and more practice. ‘I’m not worried about Derrick,’ Joakim Noah said. ‘You know, his competitive nature and all that, we’re in this together. When he struggles, we all struggle. We’re all mad that we’re not clicking, but we will. I’m confident in this team.’ On the bright side, Rose’s explosiveness and speed have returned intact, and there no longer are daily questions about his surgically repaired left knee. On the flip side, his 28.8 percent shooting and 5.7 turnovers per game are miles away from the dominant form he displayed during preseason. His struggles suggest someone who didn’t play regular-season basketball for a full season and is returning from a major injury. Which, justify the Bulls, he is. ‘I know his makeup,’ Thibodeau said. ‘Derrick’s nature is to work. He’ll be in the gym. He’ll study. The only thing he has to do is play in the game, shake some of that rust off and we have to work as a team in practice. We do that and we’ll be fine.’ [...] Gone, at least for now, is Rose’s consistent ability to get to the free-throw line. After attempting double-digit free throws in five straight exhibitions, when fouls are called more tightly, he is averaging just 3.3 per game thus far. Rose also is shooting just 26.7 percent from 3-point range after a strong preseason from that distance. ‘Not at all,’ Rose said, when asked if his confidence is shaken. ‘Amnesia. I have games like this and I’m coming off a big surgery or whatever. All I can do is get the most out of every practice, every shootaround and every shooting session.’”