by Marcel Mutoni@marcel_mutoni

Kobe Bryant did it. So did Dwight Howard (twice, in fact.)

It’s now LeBron James’ turn to benefit from the tutelage of the NBA’s postgame Yoda.

James, long maligned for seemingly not working hard enough to develop a deadly postgame (despite obvious physical advantages over, well, everyone), has enlisted Hakeem Olajuwon to help change things.

From the AP:

“Right now I’ve just been focusing on being a better player, working on my game every single day,” James said. “Like I said, the Dallas Mavericks were a great team and they deserved to win that championship. And I’ll just use that as motivation coming into this season.”

He’s also trying to deliver on his vow to be even better whenever the Heat resume play, saying he’s been in Houston at times this offseason to learn post play from one of the game’s all-time greats, former Rockets star Hakeem Olajuwon.

“I look at what he was able to do throughout his career,” James said. “Unbelievable talent. Multiple champion. Just to see how he was able to dominate in the low post, for me as an individual, I just try to look at some of the things I feel I need to get better at and hit home at it. Our team becomes better if I continue to get better and that’s what it’s about.”

For about eight years now, fans and media have wondered why LeBron didn’t look more comfortable posting guys up, and instead focused on bull-rushing to the hoop or the long outside jumper.

It’s encouraging to learn that even the player many consider to be the best in the League, sees room for improvement in his game.