Known as one of the more unselfish players in the League, Nuggets guard Ty Lawson is working hard this offseason to become more assertive in getting his own buckets, hoping to put pressure on opposing defenses early in games. From the Denver Post:

“The Nuggets point guard has ‘to-fix’ checklist. It, in part, is this: Left-handed dribble, left-handed layups and mid-range jump shooting. And yet, the day after the Dallas Mavericks proved passing the basketball can yield championship results, Lawson will be asked to be a bit more selfish next season – but still be a point guard. He is a speedy player whose best ability at the moment is to get to the rim and score the basketball, and the Nuggets want to take full advantage of that. Lawson is more-than-willing to oblige. It will take a fairly major shift in his mindset, though. He shares the basketball. Always has, and plans on continuing to do so even if he’s also looking for his own shot more. ‘It’s just my personality,’ Lawson said. ‘In college, I had three years I was more of a facilitator. I had Wayne Ellington, Tyler Hansbrough, Danny Green; I had a lot of players that could score. So I was the player to keep everybody happy. So, like, last year I was coming off the bench, so I played that same role. And then this year my role changed. I’ve got to be more of a scorer, more of an initiator. I can’t come out games getting the ball to everybody else get them to shoot first. It’s got to be me that’s getting to the basket and making everything go.’ Lawson became the full-time starter last season when Chauncey Billups was included in the trade that sent Carmelo Anthony to New York. And in that role he blossomed. Lawson started 31 games in all during the 2010-11 season averaging 14.6 points, 6.7 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.35 steals when he did. Asked if he thought he is close to being the player he wants to be, Lawson said ‘I think I’m close. Last year I was being more, I’m not going to say scared, but just probably timid. But I’m exactly where I want to be. I’m playing well, shooting the ball well, getting everybody involved. That’s what everybody likes from their point guard. Not a point guard who hogs the ball. Somebody that passes the ball and gets everybody involved.’”