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Monday, August 11th, 2008 at 3:02 pm  |  83 responses

The Question and The Answer (Follow Up to Friday)

Myles, B.Long, Izzo, Eboy, Allenp, TadOne….This is for you

Last Friday a interesting conversation took place in Vince’s Redeem Team column. He was making the point that the NBA was a league of special interest to Black America and several intriguing comments followed. Most were fair, some negative but overall it was as compelling a convo you’ll get on a Friday afternoon. I promised several people on the site that i would re post my questions from Friday. When i got to work today i was little hesitant, only because I don’t want to be pigeon-holed as the guy who discusses racial issues all the time. As someone who has always been fair and friendly to all kinds of people, regardless of category, i don’t want my actions to be misinterpreted. I don’t play the race card and i don’t complain about non-sensical race-based policies and you’ll never hear me talking about reperations. I’m not that dude. But i will tell the truth when it needs to be told and in a year of craziness like we’re having right now, there are so many falsehoods and so much hatred in the air that i feel obligated to stay focused on this topic even if I would rather talk about other things. Otherwise the information will be spread by people who don’t know what the hell they’re talking about. I just can’t have that. Yeah i know, we’re a basketball mag but we deal with the culture of basketball as well.  Might as well embrace that too.

Below are the questions i asked on Friday.  Please indulge.
—– I’m trying to understand your thought process. Identify one of these names or terms and explain their significance–1. Gabriel Prosser, Marcus Garvey or the term Octoroon. 2. In your opinion, what was worse—American Slavery or Jim Crow 3. What is the difference between the terms legacy and quotas. 4. During and immediately after WW2 many of the American Black men who served for the US were treated worse than the captured Germans. Why do you think things happened that way? 5. Do you think my name is an advantage for me or an disadvantage?…..answer but please don’t use wiki or google.

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  • James aka The Artist Formerly Known as Krayzie Bone

    Isn’t an Octotroon someone who was 1/8th black (like Sally hemmings). I guess the significance would be that even being 7/8ths white you could still be a slave.

  • http://birdmonster.blogspot.com tenorca

    Khalid: To #5, sadly, a disadvantage. (And by the way, you have “diadvantage,” if you wanna edit that). There’s a great chapter in Freakonomics about how folks with “black sounding” or “ethnic” names get shuffled down in the deck during job interviews. By which I mean, if your name is J’ron and you’re as qualified as, say, Cliff, I’m sorry, but Cliff is getting the job. Sad but true.

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com Eboy

    Cliff Branch? Cliff Huxtable? Jimmy Cliff?

  • http://birdmonster.blogspot.com tenorca

    All of the above. Especially Cliff Huxtable. You can’t say “no” to those sweaters.

  • http://sdfjkl.com Jukai

    Wow, it looks like I missed a fantastic conversation!!!

  • James aka The Artist Formerly Known as Krayzie Bone

    I would say Khalid that the blackness of the name would be less of a disadvantage than it’s islamic connection. If you want to step into a cesspool, try discussing anything to do with islam with the 29 percenters.

  • http://www.slamonline.com Khalid Salaam

    thanks tenorca

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com H to the Izzo

    I think being visibly Muslim is worse/more of a disadvantage in the world today than being visibly black or “ethnic”.Of course I have no way of confirming this,but it’s just a hunch.

  • http://shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com Cheryl

    Let me go back and catch up on the convo that went down, cuz this sounds right up my alley. More later…

  • http://birdmonster.blogspot.com tenorca

    No problem Khalid. Once an anal retentive editor, always an anal retentive editor.

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com Eboy

    You know what Khalid, I’ll give #5 a go to. I would imagine compared to 20 years ago, your name is STILL looked upon in a negative light. Wherin back in the day, the name may have implied a “dumb foreigner” today I could only imagine that it would be held up to the same ignorant standard that most people of uniformed ilk use as standard. The surname Salaam would probably be viewed being of Musl*m origin, and we all know that mainstream America ties most things Musl*m back to terroism since 9-11, especially. Since I’ve worked if a corporate enviornment since the early 90′s and have been on the hiring end of 100′s of subordinates over that same time period, most peoples names that seemed “ethnic” in any way, seemed to take a backseat magically once I would put their names in for submission for hire to a personal manager or a person with more swag than me in previous employment structures. Regardless of the argument, the same bottom line was this, filling lesser skilled positions relied on those “ethnic” named applicants, regardless of their skill set or educational backround. The “anglo” sounding names got the nod for the better paying, more desired, better scheduled jobs that were available. Since I’ve now been in the position of “top guy” in my current life’s work, making up for other peoples shi*ty decisions from the past gives me some hope that I’m fighting the good fight, whatever that might be from my little corner of the world.

  • http://www.alllooksame.com Tarzan Cooper

    Marcus Garvey was a major force in the back to Africa movement.

  • http://sdfjkl.com Jukai

    I’m a little disapointed. These are all great questions, but they have absolutely NOTHING to do with the article.

  • http://sdfjkl.com Jukai

    Disappointed*
    Damnit!

  • http://slamonline.com Lang Whitaker

    Didn’t Marcus Garvey play first base for the Dodgers and Padres?

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com Eboy

    Jukai, you’re just mad your screename didn’t get into the headline, fuc*er. :)

  • http://sdfjkl.com Jukai

    I’m mad because B.Long referred to me as an “asian” and I hate everything that is not white

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com Eboy

    Haha.

  • http://www.alllooksame.com Tarzan Cooper

    there will be no peace until man get equal rights and justice.

  • http://www.slamonline.com Khalid Salaam

    Eboy when i was growing up my name gave me a singular, weirdo quality. Naming a child a name like mine was incomprehensible to most Black people nevermind White people. It was hard to pronounce and harder to spell and in a lot of ways caused me stress as a kid (being called salaami sort of gets on your nerves even if you are a 3rd grader.) My parents were attempting to breathe self confidence into my lungs by giving me a name that has a lineage to something non anglo or christian. Which is important since, well. i’m not anglo or christian. People have to find self-definition and for too long Black people have been weighed down by not having that. These days i feel its a advantage. People treat me different than they would if my name was j’ron or marquezz. More respectfully i would say. I read the chapter in freakonomics you speak about. The problem is not to b*tch about people not hiring you because of your name. You can’t fix that by just being mad. Take it to court or to that companies advertisers etc. People with the names i mentioned or similar should not have to feel bad about their names. There are plenty of names that “don’t mean anything” but people accept them anyway. Its all about conditioning. You have to chance peoples conditioning. Thats what 2008 has been all about.

  • http://slamonline.com Lang Whitaker

    Oh, I didn’t know you wrote “Marcus Garvery.”

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com Eboy

    True. Very true. And it was tenorca that used freakonomics.

  • Josh from Nowhere

    I have a question, referring back to Vincent’s article from Friday. He said “a large sector of the black community … looks at the NBA as “their league.”” Is that even desirable? Do we want people looking to NBA players as role models and heros? Do we want the NBA to be the visible example of black culture that the world sees? Read some Malcom X or Martin Luther King Jr. or James Baldwin or W.E.B Dubois, or any number of authors who show the depth of black culture. Read “The Fire Next Time” by Baldwin. Compare his ideas to those of say … Kobe Bryant, who if I remember from a recent interview hasn’t read any books since high school except the Harry Potter series. Everyone’s always trying to one up each other (Baldwin said people aren’t worried about equality, they’re worried about superiority, and at the risk of backlash I’ll say he meant that to include every race). I love slam and read it daily, but rarely comment, but as a sociologist I couldn’t let this pass by. I mean, I NEVER read any of those authors until college. Now, that could be a fault of the American School System, but I did know all about Micheal Jordan and Kobe Bryant and Shaq and none of them used their position to improve race relations. I’m just saying who cares “whose” league the NBA is. Except for reading to kids for NBA cares commercials and the occasional public service announcement during black history month they haven’t used much of their obscenely large amount of money to make the world a better place. Doesn’t seem like much of a role model to me.

  • http://slamonline.com Lang Whitaker

    From House Party: “Why’d they give that boy a Muslim name…knowing full well he’s from Cleveland…”

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com Eboy

    To echo your not getting mad comment, Kha, I guess like Chuck said “when I get mad, I put it down on a pad, give ‘em something that they never had” kind of rings true if what your writing is able to shed light on what all of us need to be up to speed on, like 60 years ago.

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com Eboy

    *you’re

  • http://hibachi20.blogspot.com DP

    I’d say Jim Crow. since I’m still living in it in mississippi today.

  • James aka The Artist Formerly Known as Krayzie Bone

    I think the best way to start a comparrison of Jim Crow and Slavery would be to do a body count. Since West africans were treated with about as much care as slaughterhouse chickens on crates in the highway during transport, Slavery was an order of magnitude worse than Jim Crow.

    As for the question of why some germans were treated better, it’s because they were wanted (weapons scientists and counter insurgency theorists). Also, its worth remembering that while blacks were still hated, germans were loved by many americans, particularly your president’s grandfathers, after the war in europe broke out.

  • http://www.slamonline.com Khalid Salaam

    Next question. All these comments are great (thanks), percentage-wise how many people can also answer these questions?

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com Eboy

    Less than 10% without researching.

  • http://sdfjkl.com Jukai

    Question: What does this have to do with Friday’s article?

  • B. Long

    @Khalid: Thanks for the knowledge. And I’d go with an even lower number than that E, but then again I’m from the South so my thinking my be skewed.

  • http://dyalekt.com d.Y.

    Ooh oooh… according to some old dude on tv (and some heads back inna de day) President Warren G. Harding was an octaroon, thus giving Barack (and Cynthia McKinney) the chance of being the SECOND black president. From wayback, if you were 1/16th or more African, you were a negro. Caucasians in power are beginning to flip the script on that stance considering how many folks in this country are mixed in some way. Also, kinda gives me a lil retro respect for Warren G., who must’ve done some researching before selecting a rap name.

    Oh and on the next question: I think the average head can give you an intelligent response on 2 or more of them, but that may be optimistic. Let’s say the average head who knows the difference between “their” “there” and “they’re” can do 2.5.

    Oh… a likkle bit more- Your name means peace, which is always a good thing.

  • http://www.slamonline.com Khalid Salaam

    Jukai, it wasn’t directly related to Vince’s article. It was more me reading the comments and thinking at least partially that people didn’t understand the point he was making. The reason for the misunderstanding has to do with so out the loop with the Black experience that people just can’t comment properlu because they are socially out of their element. My comments and now post is my response to that. basketball means something different in the Black community and how can people really understand the point he’s making when they don’t understand the people he’s talking about. Whether you agree then is another story but until you are familiar with the people it just seems crazy to comment. He wasn’t making a basketball point, he was making a cultural point. You have to know the culture 1st and people don’t. Eboy mentions 10 percent as the number of people who have a more than general idea of the Black experience. Ok so how can we spread this knowledge. its 2008 man, this sh*t needs to get solved.

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com H to the Izzo

    I would say that the majority of my friends would know the answer to at least 2-3 of those Q’s,mainly because it is taught in schools over here.Not bad considering the differing countries/cultures and the fact I was born in the 90′s.

  • http://slamonline.com Holly MacKenzie

    I totally missed this original convo on Friday, but thanks for challenging people to open their minds, Khalid. It is both shocking and disheartening to realize how much people DON’T know and also how often they don’t even realize their own ignorance with regards to history. “It’s 2008 man, this sh*t needs to get solved.” Keep on talking, Khalid.

  • http://sdfjkl.com Jukai

    Khalid, I think Vince’s article was just badly phrased. He made it sound like the NBA was the “Black man’s league” instead of trying to say that it has a more special meaning, generally, to the black community. Reading it made it seem like I wasn’t suppose to feel violently ill when Phoenix lost to San Antonio two years ago, or when O’Neil fouled Kobe in the 2003 all-star game. Still, I understood what he meant and agreed with it more than the usual Vincent article so I let it go. It appears other people didn’t. That’s my take on it, anyway.

  • http://sdfjkl.com Jukai

    Khalid, my only real problem is, I’d say that for questions 1-4, a great majority of black america would be as clueless as white america. Do you think an average black youth in Brooklyn would know who Gabriel Prosser is? An Octoroon? You think that?

  • http://www.myspace.com/hemantsbeats what

    I think you’re a lot worse off in today’s America being named “Khalid Salaam” than, say, “JaQuavious Jackson”. Sad that names should make a difference at all, but right now I think that’s the current situation.

  • http://birdmonster.blogspot.com tenorca

    I agree with Jukai here: that article did feel more like the NBA was the special province of Black America. As a scraggly white kid raised on the Warriors and who has a marked disdain for both the other major US sports leagues, I found it odd, vaguely exclusionary, but provocative. One of the better SLAM pieces in recent memory, though, if a little flawed.

  • http://www.slamonline.com Khalid Salaam

    Jukai you are absolutely right. I don’t think people know much about Black History or the present other than what they see on tv or hear about on random websites. and thats regardless of their racial make-up or background. thats why i can’t sit back and not speak about what i know to be true. i’m no savior but i’m not a b*tch either. I will not hesitate to say what needs to be said.

  • http://www.myspace.com/hemantsbeats what

    I thought I knew quite a bit about black history, but I gotta admit I had no clue who Gabriel Prosser was before I read this article.

  • B. Long

    +1Jukai’s 5:02 comment, not so much his 5:00 though.

  • http://nothinpersonal8.blogspot.com/ nothin personal

    Wow, Nice post. i am reading the comments later tonight, while watching Greece (hopefully) Defeating Germany. Thanks Khalid!

  • http://slamonline.com Lang Whitaker
  • http://cryinghard.com Jukai

    B Long, elaborate

  • http://www.ravingblacklunatic.blogspot.com Allenp

    I’m glad you followed up Khalid. I wish you wouldn’t have used the phrase “race card” the way you did, and I really wish you didn’t feel like it was a problem being labeled as the cat who discusses racial problems all the time. When I was in grad school at the University of Maryland there was a cat in the doctorate program who was always dropping knowledge on racial issues and giving historical context. At the time, as a young buck I agreed with the dude a lot, but I used to get embarassed that he always wanted to talk about race everyday. I thought that the white people in our class would listen more if he would take a break some days and just not mention race. I later discovered I was wrong. It doesn’t matter how frequently or infrequently you discuss racial issues, a certain large segment of the population is always going to be convinced that it’s not the right time to have that discussion. So I say don’t worry about getting pigeonholed as the race guy; who cares if you’re the race guy? Far too few people are afraid to discuss racial issues in an open, honest and intelligent manner and then deal with the fallout from those discussions. We need more people willing to be “race guys.” Oh, and Khalid, you never answered my question from the other thread.

  • http://birdmonster.blogspot.com tenorca

    Well said, Allenp

  • B. Long

    I’m half Native American and half Irish so I’m fully aware that both of my nationalities have put up share of bullsh!t over the past but does this mean that I should boycott watching the Olympics because they tried to take away Jim Thorpe’s medals or should only root for Tom Brady and the Pats(UGH!) because he’s a potatoe eater too? I understand and embrace my heritage but I just wish more people understood that your heritage does not dictate YOUR future. I realize that racism still exsists but I also believe that by not recognizing that things ARE better now than they were 40, 20, even 10 years ago is disrespectful to the people who worked so hard to get us to where we are at. Even 10 yrs. ago Barack Obama wouldn’t have had a chance in hell at the Dem. nomination and now he’s running thru this election like TEAM USA did China in the 3rd quarter. I also believe that anything that you feel like is too serious to joke around about gives it power, especially regarding racial issues. Thats my two cents on the subject.

  • B. Long

    or potato. sorry.

  • B. Long

    @Jukai: I didn’t feel like he made it the “Black Man’s League”. I was perfectly comfortable with everything in the aritcle except the part about the NFL still being racist at the quarterback position. That was a little outdated.

  • http://www.shawn-kemps-offspring.blogspot.com H to the Izzo

    I agree with B.Long,if I were to focus too much on my country’s history and who invaded us,I don’t think I’d live a normal life.Also it’s worth mentioning that racism(whatever that word means)is mild in the US compared to some countries.

  • http://birdmonster.blogspot.com tenorca

    B Long pulls the Dan Quayle. That takes me back.

  • http://www.ravingblacklunatic.blogspot.com Allenp

    Everybody has a different definition of a normal life. My heroes, the folks I admire, didn’t just say things are better for us now then they were in the past so we need to acknowledge that or we’re being disrespectful. Nope, the fought for full equality and were vigilante about pointing out injustice. Since black people landed in this country, every generation has been told that they have things better than their forefathers. There’s always been truth in that statement. And that sentiment has often been used to stifle dissent and protest.

  • B. Long

    I’m a little slow tenorca. What’s a Dan Quayle? Besides a piss poor VP?

  • http://birdmonster.blogspot.com tenorca

    Back in 1992, Quayle was visiting classrooms as the sitting VP. A kid (who I think was maybe 11 or 12) wrote “potato” on the board and Quayle, being the brilliant mind he was, instructed the kid to add the “e” so as to spell it correctly. In other words, he made the exact same spelling mistake as you…except he didn’t realize it…and you aren’t the Vice President.

  • B. Long

    The world would be a better place if I was though. Actually the world would probably be a better place if Flavor Flav was the VP instead of Dick Hallichaney.

  • B. Long

    Or an human with an actual soul.

  • B. Long

    any

  • http://birdmonster.blogspot.com tenorca

    I can’t really argue with that “human with an actual soul” thing. I won’t be missing his shriveled mug come January.

  • Boing Dynasty

    My future is so bright, i limo tinted my shades.

  • http://slamonline.com Khalid Salaam

    Allenp thanks for the words. I don’t remember your question, can you restate it?

  • http://www.shawnkempsoffspring.com Tariq

    Khalid, your questions really make me feel ignorant, because I can’t answer most of them. Here’s what I sorta kinda know:

    1- An octaroon is someone who is either 1/8th or 1/16th Black.
    2- As bad as enforced segregation is, methinks slavery is infinitely worse.
    3- Just to ignorant I am, when I read “WW2″ and “Black”, the term that popped into my head was “Tuskegee airmen”.
    4- I know what you mean regarding the name. Back in the nineties, whenever I came to the US I had people call me “Derek” or “Rick”. Just so you know, you’re probably named Khalid because of a Companion of the Prophet named Khalid ibn al Waleed. The name originated in the Arabian Peninsula, but because of him, Europeans and Africans started naming their sons “Khalid”. If you don’t know who he is, you really should read about him. He makes me realize the difference between a man and a punk in a very pronounced way; him being the man and me being the punk.

  • http://www.shawnkempsoffspring.com Tariq

    By the way, my brother’s name is Khalid too.

    Also, I’m looking up Marcus Garvey and them.

  • http://www.shawnkempsoffspring.com Tariq

    Evidently, “Prosser” was never part of Gabriel’s name. It was actually the name of his owners. So just “Gabriel”.

  • David

    Khalid, please don’t apologize for these kinds of posts. I read Slam and Slamonline because it’s sports grounded in reality and humor (like Penny Hardaway come-back articles). I personally always look forward to your posts because they seem to have forethought. And isn’t ‘thought-provoking’ the whole theme for Dave Zirin? His articles are great, too.

    Back on topic – I think that part of the reason that so few people know much about culture, history, and their influences are that we’re so used to being pleasantly distracted by a lot of material things. So much entertainment and content that is all about sensationalism and consumerism, so little about reflection, meaning, or really constructing lines of action that work at building the world that we all seem to feel we want but no one is willing to articulate. Think about it – everyone is capable of complaining, few are able to identify the causes of the ills of society, fewer are trying to do anything. Or at least much more than post comments on message boards. ;)

    By the way – Lang your irreverent comments on this post are funny and I’m surprised about how little attention you’ve drawn. I don’t think I’ve ever seen you be so ignored on Slamonline – hope you haven’t let it hurt your feelings.

  • http://www.shawnkempsoffspring.com Tariq

    Oh, I knew that quotas were part of affirmative action, but I had never heard the term “legacy” used like that. I know that prospective students with familial ties to a university get preferential treatment, which is the only way one can explain the fact that Bush graduated from Yale, but I didn’t know the phenomenon was called “legacy preferences”. I assume that’s what you’re talking about.

  • http://slamonline.com Khalid Salaam

    yes tariq thats what i meant. legacy preference is another word for affirmative action. again, its all about perception. not the truth, which is sadly losing importance every year.

  • Z

    Not that it has anything to do with anything… but how is a professional team – in 2008 – called the freaking REDSKINS??!?!?!

  • http://myspace.com/mrdyalekt d.Y.

    because there aren’t enough natives left to protest.

  • http://hibachi20.blogspot.com/ RV

    Honestly, i hadn’t even noticed the team was all black, but i guess thats why i shouldn’t make comments on a post like Vincent’s. I also agree with Jukai’s comment about many youths not knowing the answer to Khalid’s questions, black or white. Sadly, i don’t have much more to contribute to this post.

  • The Ghost of Wilt Chamberlain

    As an Executive Recruiter/Headhunter for some of the largest organisations on the planet, I can confirm from experience that a name certainly does impact an employment application. Most senior departments within the corporate world are still white male, old-boy, private school dominated. The culture of the organisation spreads from the top and as sad as it is to say, if you are a white male or female you are far more likely to gain employment than if you are of an ethnic background. The name is the first thing you see when assessing an application, and from a recruitment stand point, judgements are certainly formulated from the first words that you read. Due to the amount of applications and limited amount of hours in a day, if the name doesn’t seem to fit the culture of the company then it is probably not worthwhile screening the applicant.
    I see incredibly qualified and able candidates ignored everyday due to their name and the judgements that we as people make of them. Sad, but certainly true.

  • III

    Is Deron Williams black?? Kidd’s half black n half white. And how about Boozer??

  • http://hibachi20.blogspot.com Hursty

    This is the kind of stuff worth reading. Thankyou SLAM for producing this. Thank you so much. Readers- thank you. Really. Issues wont be resolved by dancing around them. Thank you. Ben, I really think more stuff like this is necessary, not just whos fu*king who in the NBA, celebrities or minor family issues. Thankyou so much for raising this again Khalid and Vince for being the instigator.

  • http://hibachi20.blogspot.com Hursty

    Slavery was worse but the Crow laws being introduced only 3 generations ago with people being affected by those repercussions today are disgraceful. As a person who studied extended USA socio-political events this year for Modern History, we as Australian students are learning about this in history and its shocking to learn about how awful things were. Missisipi Burning was deep. Almost surreal as to how bad things were, just really fu*ked up, the fact these people, not just on the Mason-Dixon line but above it as well, thought they were doing the right thing is an abomination. I hate it. It was important that it got brung(sp?) and if something like that was to make it into the magazine I feel it could only do the mag justice and shows how socially aware people ARENT at the moment since it obviously isnt tought enough in school these days in the USA or just involves an overview. To move forward in society you need to recognise and understand the past and only by doing that can you fully move on and progress as a society and involve yourself fully in culture. My point, basically, is that learn from the past and progress. apologise damn it. Oh, and I had no idea that Izzo was younger than 25 since SKO is full of old, decrepid people.

  • http://hibachi20.blogspot.com Hursty

    *brought up sorry.*taught.17 or 18 Izzo actually. 90′s pride.

  • http://slamonline.com Ben Osborne

    Hursty, I’m glad you’re enjoying the different topics great writers like Khalid and Vince bring to the table, but when do we ever write about “whose (sic) fu*king who in the NBA”?

  • http://sdfjkl.com Jukai

    Hursty, in fairness, did you even read the Vincent article…?

  • http://sdfjkl.com Jukai

    Not to set this discussion back a bit, but as great as Khalid’s words are, I still think Vincent’s article is incredibly flawed. Let’s not turn this issue around 180 degrees now.

  • Permaculture

    Hear hear on having a forum to discuss interesting things.
    #1 Octoroon – 1/8 black, criteria for “eligibility” to be owned, have less rights (voting?)
    2. American Slavery is worse: no matter how bad Jim Crow is, it can’t compare to institutionalized (legitimatized) ownership — imagine its continued trade if it were to happen today.
    3. What is the difference between the terms legacy and quotas. I’ll confess I read the answer in the comments (but I might have come close)
    4. American Black/ captured Germans: I’m ignorant on this chapter but here goes. The Germans didn’t “Pearl Harbor/9/11″ our soil, they looked white, the US had the self image of having fought the “good war” and saw the Nuremberg trials as being justice (so no need to kick em while down). I’m aware this doesn’t even touch the Black side of the issue.
    5. Do you think my name is an advantage for me or an disadvantage? I’m thinking disadvantage due to 9/11, and potentially “off-putting” overtones ala Ali and Kareem.
    Khalid: I totally sympathize with your being loathe to be race guy. For what it’s worth, you’ve always come off as very sane to me.
    Interesting side note: dad was chinese and that was so rare in the work place of the 50s that it sometimes acted to separate him in a sort of good way: he was unique rather than an “identifiable minority” (ie black) and so was judged as an individual on “merit based” lines.

  • Froggiestyle

    Khalid – Sorry I’m late to the party, I was away – as always I love your take on things (I still miss Ralph Wiley but I’m sure we all do) first off, aint nuttin wrong with people going out and learning things that they don’t know. Vive la google 4 lyphe – that said

    1 – Marcus Garvey was Bob Marley before Bob was born – most thoughtful influential Jamaican for decades.
    1a – if you go that route tho, why not also have cats google the theories on northern hemisphere vs. southern hemisphere and the mentalities, cultures, traditions and travesties that ensued.
    2 – I honestly don’t see the point in comparing the two. They both have a lot to say about past mentalities and the generational hurdles that resulted from them. Not to be forgotten, overlooked or ignored, BUT the struggle goes on just as bad and MUCH WORSE in many places in the world. Recognise and then go seek out how desperate things are elsewhere TODAY. I’m not cutting the US any slack, but you hang with enough people from across the globe and you know that there’s some hard core stuff that most Americans’ brains can’t begin to compute that others live on a daily basis.
    3 – don’t see your point, but quota is like a limit, cap or ceiling; legacy in my mind depending on the context can be like a form of inheritance or family history.
    4 – well that seems fairly obvious why that was – and a tad reductionist to only bring up blacks, the Japanese (born in the country) had it worse and to ignore them – if you’re talking about that time period – is a little unfortunate.
    5 – honestly, in the age of OBAMA as in BARACK, grandson of HUSSIEN ONYANGO of the Luo tribe? How can that be anything but wayyyyy positive. Sheeeeeet For the first time in years I walk around as a proud American here in France carrying my Dreams from my Father book (straight out amazing on his life – the politics interested me less than the human being and his journey) and start up conversations about how things are gonna change, how the US can actually get back on track with International Relations with my brother Obama in the Oval office. Good reasons to keep the faith and hope alive in 2008 – my only questions is will he win one or two terms :)

  • Froggiestyle

    PS. get out and vote peoples !

  • Froggiestyle

    had a brain fart, its been so long – I think its “cradles” not hemispheres… from Diop

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