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Tuesday, August 21st, 2012 at 10:59 am  |  148 responses

Poll: 58 Percent of College Coaches Believe Players Should be Paid


by Eldon Khorshidi | @eldonadam

CBSSports.com recently surveyed nearly 100 college coaches, getting their thoughts on some of college basketball’s current issues. One question asked was, “Should college basketball players be paid, and if so, how would you compensate them?” The coaches spoke—anonymously, of course—and 58 percent believe college basketball players should be paid, while 42 percent disagreed. Some coaches had ideas for compensation—for example, providing the student-athletes with an end-of-semester stipend—while others simply wanted a change but didn’t have a solution.

Below is a complete breakdown of the poll, followed by some adamant opinions, all courtesy of CBSSports.com:

YES – 58 percent

NO – 42 percent

Suggested methods:

—Build compensation right into the scholarship package with a stipend at the end of each semester: 28 percent
—Players should be allowed to receive endorsement money (Olympic model): 20 percent
—Cost-of-living grants is the way to go: 12 percent
—Make leagues responsible for paying via their own profits: 8 percent
—Want change but don’t have a solution: 8 percent

Notable Quotes

“Absolutely not. They get free college, crazy amounts of free gear and glorified enough as it is. This isn’t pro sports, but if they get paid — even a small amount — it gives the players even more power than they already have. We would start to see more Dwight Howard situations at colleges.”

“Stipends are good. I think it would tough to start talking about someone’s market value.”

“No one is forcing these kids to play. College educations are already so expensive. In a lot of ways, they’re getting paid. I don’t think most schools can afford to pay basketball players, because then don’t you have to pay everyone else playing D-I? That’s not possible.”

“I would give them a piece of the money that the league receives for that league’s team making the tournament. For instance, if we make the tournament, our league gets money that is split between each school in our league. Some of that money should be given to the players.”

“I think athletes should be paid a few thousand a semester. To keep gender equity and Title IX out of the way, they should allow coaches to pay kids out of that sport’s summer camp fund. $2,500 or so per semester. That would be an easy solution for football and men’s basketball because the camps generate enough revenue. If not, boosters should be able to donate until each player receives the maximum amount of money.”

“Would be the possible way to eliminate lure of agents. Need to incorporate GPA and wealth level of family. Household income would be best way. Make the process similar to a college loan process — so there would be some hoops to go through. Maybe 500-1000 a month.”

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  • http://thahiphopcorner.com Kevin

    Tell them to get a job. It’s a bunch of struggling college kids out there who dont play basketball, who have low funds, no scholarships and trying to get by. Just cause they play ball dont make them no special than any other college student out there

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    @ Kevin, the thing is, these players are actually generating millions of dollars of revenue for their respective schools.

  • http://thahiphopcorner.com Kevin

    I know that but it’s still not fair to the other students around these universities who are eating Ramen and Hot Pockets in their dorm room. I just think doing this opens up a can of worms. I think them getting endorsement money is fine but not getting outright paid from the university or anything like that

  • http://www.slamonline.com Gezus

    Its should be the farther you get in the tournament the higher your team gets paid

  • http://cnbc.com JTaylor21

    All these coaches are being hypocritical. They get paid millions of dollars to coach in the amaetur level yet they disagree paying the guys that actually do all the work and make billions of dollars each year for the NCAA/Colleges.
    Also, all the talk about them “getting a free education” is BS because having a degree doesn’t guarantee you anything in terms of good-to-high paying jobs. A majority of cats playing college ball will not even sniff the professional level.

  • http://www.slamonline.com nbk troll

    Love the pic of oj.mayo. I think they should get paid but not @ the time of playing. like once you graduate or go pro or leave in any kind of way you get a check.

  • http://cnbc.com JTaylor21

    Modern day slavery at it’s purest.

  • http://cnbc.com JTaylor21

    Nobody pays money to watch Coach K stand on the sidelines at Cameron, no one pays top dollar to watch Roy Williams coach and no one pays to watch Coach Cal yell. They pay to watch the Anthony Davis’, Grant Hills’ and Patrick Ewings’ of the college world.

  • http://www.slamonline.com spit hot fiyah

    why is there a picture of oj mayo? (sarcastic font)

  • http://twitter.com/TwelveInchFinch Creflow Dollars

    Kevin, what makes you think a student athlete has the time to get a part time job? Have you ever seen the schedule of a student athlete who plays a D1 sport? Let alone a revenue generating one like football or basketball, the demands on your time along with one’s schoolwork simply dont allow the time to have a job.

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    That’s the thing, though. Even students who work for their school’s bookstore and athletic facilities get paid. Why can’t players?

  • http://www.slamonline.com spit hot fiyah

    @dameat hook, that’s a pretty good point, since they both generate revenue for the university. i guess the counter argument would be that the free scholarship comes out to a lot of money that they r getting in the form of a degree (if they finish it)

  • IGGI

    @JTaylor21—Say that again and say it louder this time!!!!

  • http://thahiphopcorner.com Kevin

    Creflow it can be done, is it difficult? Yes it is but it can be done, it’s not impossible. My cousin played D1 football at TCU and maintained a job, my friend’s brother did the same thing at Prairie View (not D1 but still).

  • pposse

    the only reason why a coach would agree these kids should get paid is cause then they would be able to have them work on their game a lot more and have it be justified. Who will end up paying these kids, their peers? The only way an ahtlete should get paid and it being acceptable in my eyes is if it strictly comes out of advertising revenues.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Man, that first response is ridiculous.
    Apparently, the world works best when multi-billion dollar corporations make all the decisions and the actual folks responsible for the product shut up and follow instructions. Hogwash.
    I say either let the shoe companies pay them, or let them get paid based on profit associated with their sport. The key word there is PROFIT. In fact, let them collect both. If colleges don’t like players attitudes, cut them loose. And allow them to sign with whatever team they want to sign with.
    See, that’s the real issue. Colleges want to be able to make ridiculous demands on kids, and maintain “power” by keeping them poor and dependent. It’s all a hustle.

  • http://cnbc.com JTaylor21

    This is another reason why I’m so against the stay one year in college rule that the NBA has and the stay in college 3yrs rule that the NFL has. There is no such rule for other sports like futbol, swimming, gymnastics and baseball. If you’re good enough in those sports, you can turn pro like that.
    Notice how it’s the two main sports that are dominanted by minorities (mainly blacks) that implemented such a rule?

  • http://slamonline.com Wayno

    Yeah, giving kids a free education with a monetary value in the $20,000 – $60,000 range is modern day slavery…GTFOH. The idea of paying collegiate level atheletes is a joke.

  • http://slamonline.com Wayno

    If they want to get payed they can go to Europe. The whole 1 year college requirement is stupid though. If a player is good enough to be a pro then they’re good enough to be a pro. Requiring 1 year of college seems pointless.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    And NCAA prevents players from getting many types of jobs AND with the crazy schedules and one-year contracts every player receives exactly how would they juggle a job and playing ball?
    Move forward with the plan to allow four year contracts. Allow schools to lock players up long term and pay them. It would be just like professional basketball with the added rules about eligibility and the ability to void contracts for a variety of reasons.
    Schools don’t want to do this because they want the flexibility to eliminate players, recoup that money and continue to have team success. Because the well being of the players is not that important.

  • http://www.slamonline.com spit hot fiyah

    @allenp, not to mention they want to stash it in their own pockets

  • http://slamonline.com Wayno

    Again I submit to you this…collegiate players are getting full ride scholarships that include 1.) An education 2.) Room and board 3.) Access to to training staffs and facilities 4.) 3 square meals per day among other benefits given, yet somehow that isn’t enough…

  • http://cnbc.com JTaylor21

    They are making billions of dollars for a coporation that doesn’t pay them a dime. Sounds like a form of slavery to me.
    I know folks like to get all sensitive whenever someone mentions the word “slavery” in this day and time but it’s what it is.
    FYI, there are different forms of slavery.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Wayno
    Again, they don’t get a free education. They receive an one-year contract to attend school provided the produce on the court and don’t get injured. That’s it. No one says schools HAVE to pay kids. Just like Ivy League schools don’t give out merit based scholarships. The rationale is that it’s such a privilege to attend college at those schools and everyone is exceptional, so no one gets a free ride for that.
    Schools can adopt that mantra if they choose. It’s not MANDATORY it is optional. So, schools refuse to pay players and attract the players they are able to attract based on their names and what they offer as far as education. And those schools that are willing to pay attract who they attract. And players, who amount to workers, get to choose.
    See, you all are arguing that the players, who are workers, should be happy with being paid in a future promise of an education that is difficult for them to obtain given their schedules for their respective sports. Despite most Americans love for capitalism, you only want capitalism for certain people. Allow it for everyone. Let the market dictate how much these players are worth. If a team really feels like players aren’t worth being paid, then don’t pay them.
    Simple.

  • pposse

    plus the kids that do have nba talent but are stuck in college for a year or two can go to the bank and take out whatever type of money they need (ie loan, credit card, hell the super talented might just get a black card)sure its a risk, but as is life. The paying rights are forfeited once you get your scholarship. If i am not mistaken, these same players are also able to play against top level talent that are their age, so its a win win. Free education, free competition.

  • http://cnbc.com JTaylor21

    So…you believe that getting all those things you mentioned are equal in value to the billions of dollars college athletes make for their universities and the NCAA each year?
    Come on now, you can’t be that naive.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Wayno
    Why should it “be enough”?
    Why should a player be limited in how much they can earn for a skill that is worth billions of dollars?
    That’s not the American way. Well scratch that. It is the American way, but that’s not the fiction we like to sell the rest of the world.
    The players are prohibited from earning money now. Just remove that prohibition. You don’t force schools to pay, you just allow them to pay. Like allowing them to offer four year deals. It is quite shocking how many rules the NCAA has that reduce the security of the very same athletes they claim to be more concerned about.

  • pposse

    allenp i am positive that coaches at these institutions cannot legally treat these college athletes as ‘workers’ – they cannot kick them off the team for not showing up to a non mandatory workout or not play them if they don’t go to some film session. The athletes that are treating their experience as work are most likely the athletes that have a future in the nba to begin with.

  • The Spaniard

    The real question is…

    Why is there ANY restriction on athletes receiving money from anyone at all. If a UNC booster wants to give a star freshman $100,000 to play, so what? For what rational reason is that restricted? If I had an academic scholarship and someone gave me $1,000,000 to attend the same school no one would restrict my studies.

    The only restriction should be whether or not they meet the academic credentials of the school. Let the schools worry about their academic reputation and integrity.

    At a university with a big time sports program, the athletes have the work and training schedule of PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES and they generate revenue like PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES. The schools like the current system because a) they get cheap labor b) they know that college is overpriced anyway and c) if the talent doesn’t work out they can REVOKE the scholarship after 1 year in most cases.

    All of you “free” education advocates sound like ignorant fools.

  • B.Plump

    Of course, yes. With recent improving study qualifications for athletes the best players will travel to Europe with the one year and done model. Let the kids jump at NBA, or pay them a basic salary (same for all) or let them play the development league if they don’t want an education right now. Look, Coach K is supposed to be a teacher and get paid for his work at clasroom and then coach for free. Like old times. But not, Coach K recieves 7 mil dolar every year to coach players with his parents living at poverty. That’s not fair. If they want players play for free coaches must coach for free and get paid for teach maths. And the universities must stop the merchandising machine and forget the television rights and the money of sponsors like Nike.

  • http://cnbc.com JTaylor21

    Scholarships aren’t guaranteed. A school can cut a player and take away his scholarships at their discretion.

  • http://slamonline.com Wayno

    It’s called capitalism…players don’t run and manage the NBA and players don’t run and manage colligiate sports, just like an average line worker at a factory doesn’t run and manage the whole factory. I just don’t understand why some people take to fighting for the rights future millionaires to make more money as if they weren’t given enough. Y’all are acting like they have this hard terrible life as collegiate atheletes and they’re being forced to play basketball. The vast majority of people who will ever have a job doing anything will have someone above them who makes more than they do as a result of what they do. Typically the life blood of the workforce are the ones making pennies on the dollar compared to those who run it.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Pposse
    So you’re saying that players should only be allowed to take out a loan against future potential earning instead of being able to monetize their talents immediately?
    Why is that exactly?
    They are adults. They have a skill that the market demands. Based on the foundational principles of capitalism, they should be allowed to earn money. Instead, another entity is preventing that from happening so that it can increase its profits.
    Y’all really don’t see how this goes against every free market principle? If no one makes money, then that’s fine. If everyone makes money, then that’s fine. But it’s not fine when you selectively decide who has the right to earn money, how much they can earn, how they can earn it and where they can earn it.
    And if you argue that the NCAA is a corporation, then we need to investigate them for why they don’t have workers compensation, when need to investigate the mingling of public and private funds, we need to investigate a lot exactly.
    NCAA and its fans want all the benefits of capitalism for them, and none for the workers. Figures.

  • IGGI

    @Wayno—-$20,000-$60,000, compaare to billions that thye take in base on the hard work of the players. If that is not modern day slavery then show me what is. Atlest let the shoes companies pay them….

  • http://slamonline.com Wayno

    An if y’all don’t like that then go start another country somewhere else…Socialism looks great on paper and all, but lets not act like capitalism isn’t one of the main reasons America is great.

  • The Spaniard

    “allenp i am positive that coaches at these institutions cannot legally treat these college athletes as ‘workers’ they cannot kick them off the team for not showing up to a non mandatory workout or not play them if they don’t go to some film session.”

    And you are are positively wrong and ill-informed to how a college team works. You can be cut for anything, at any time whatsoever. The vast majority of scholarships are 1 year renewable. Meaning after one year the coach can simply REVOKE your scholarship for any reason he chooses. They don’t have to give you a reason. A coach can not play you for whatever reason he can dream up.

  • hillbilly

    When I was in med school, I worked every summer as an EMT (graveyard shift). When classes started in the fall, I’d work weekends, sometimes back-to-back shifts. There’s no real excuse for having empty pockets in this world. If you’re waiting on a handout just because you think you ‘deserve’ it, you should try pissing up a rope in the meantime and see how that works out for you. (Oh, wait! I forgot, this is the Entitlement Generation we’re talking about here. You really DO deserve that money because you’re so goshdarn special!)

  • http://slamonline.com Wayno

    @ IGGI – it’s not about what they make compared to anybody. The fact is if they’re good enough, they can get paid in Europe. Slavery involves being forced to do something…last time I checked these kids are not required to accept a scholarship and play basketball.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Wayno
    You can’t call collegiate sports a business. The NBA is a business. At the end of the day, businesses make business decisions. I don’t have to agree with them, but they have that right.
    NCAA isn’t a business. At least that’s not what it claims to be. It claims its mission is the protection of student athletes. That’s why it was founded. It’s not supposed to be interested in making a profit, it’s supposed to be doing what’s best for athletes.
    I’ve heard lots of folks argue about what athletes deserve, but I haven’t heard a single person argue that athletes are better off not being paid. That this is actually the best deal for them. You know why no one has argued that? Because no one believes it.

  • http://cnbc.com JTaylor21

    What makes it right for the coaches to get paid millions of dollars and the players nothing? So no one has a problem with Coach Cal living in a 10,000 square feet mansion making 4.5 million while the people that the fans pay to see are living in dorm rooms (most likey with one other person).

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    The NCAA has a “.org” address on the web. That means it’s a non-profit. Yet, you all are arguing from either a profit making perspective, or from the idea that despite living in a capitalist society you want to put a cap on how much certain workers can earn.
    Only certain workers though.
    Classic.

  • pposse

    Yes, if need be, if they must. The college will provide them with food, shelter, and a whole bunch of sneakers and athletic apparel for their contributions. To me, its not about capitalism, but about the integrity of all educational institutions around the world. From my understanding in one of your earlier posts you want said that it should be up to the college how much and if the athlete should get paid; does that not scream to you plenty of recruiting violations down the line? What about the other students who go to the school and pay their tuition? What if they could care less about sports, but find out one day that $1 went directly from their hand to some athlete they don’t care about? To me, thats not acceptable. I have no idea how the NCAA splits the profits to each school, but if the kids were to get paid it HAS to be thru the NCAA and not the educational institution. But that would just cause all types of problems, more departments opening up an inevitably higher tuition costs for the average student imo.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    PPosse
    Actually, coaches can refuse to renew a players scholarship simply because they don’t like them. They have wide discretion. You need to study the rules some more before you start making comments.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Hillbilly
    Your argument is poor. You earned money. The players can earn money.
    The only thing stopping them from earning money doing what they do best is the NCAA’s rules.
    See how that’s different. We’re not arguing that schools be forced to pay. We’re arguing that players be allowed to ask for payment for their services.
    Totally different ballgame from a handout. It’s amazing how many people can’t seem to grasp this fundamental and important difference. Something must be clogging your brains.

  • http://slamonline.com Wayno

    @ Allen -yes…it would be better for a student athelete if they were paid, just like it would be better for my if my salary doubled next year…NCAA may be about protecting atheletes and what not, but they are about profit too. Maybe that’s not what they claim to be about, but it is what they’re about. NCAA is just like any other business. They have a voluntary “workforce” that makes money for them. They compensate that workforce how they choose. If a player or athelete doesn’t like that compensation, they have every right to seek better compensation elsewhere.

  • pposse

    the fact is if these athletes will get paid, believe me the coaches will spit it back at their faces and make them work like dogs every day without anyone telling them to take it easy one them. Thats the only reason why i would think coaches want their kids to get paid, so they can work them harder than they already do.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndyfsS0bFK8 nbk

    They should be paid.
    .
    College students on multiple academic scholarship regularly get extra money from the school to do whatever they please with. One of my teammates from high school got a full ride scholarship, plus grant money for his major, plus a few minor scholarships, he ended up getting his school paid for + an extra $5,000 a semester CASH. And he brought no actual monetary value to the school. — Plus he was able to get a job.
    .
    Tell me, does it seem fair that non-athletes can get paid extra money from the school (or trustees or whatever) + have time to get a job while the student athletes are bringing millions of dollars into their school without having any time to make extra money. Often student athletes have a harder college life than any other full-time students because of the time that their respective sport takes away from everything else…..which includes, making money to pay for life.

  • http://slamonline.com Wayno

    I mean, socialism looks great on paper and all, but lets not act like capitalism isn’t a huge reason that the US became the world power that it is.

  • Yann Blavec

    If the players get the money they deserve, they would stay in college 4 years to avoid cheap rookie contract.

  • The Spaniard

    Hillbilly-While I’m overwhelmed by your dedication to working while in school, you seem to be missing something very important. a) Athletes are RESTRICTED from where, when, who and how much they can work outside of the school and b) the athletes are not asking for a handout. They are directly responsible for generating revenue for the university. The ATHLETES are the primary force behind the giant television contracts and product endorsement deals. I see few Duke Law or UCLA Business Administration t-shirts in public.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    PPosse
    I don’t care who handles the payments. I just want to see players allowed to be paid. As for recruiting violations, they clearly already exist. They will always exist.
    Keep it 100 about why cats really oppose players being paid.
    1. They know if schools can pay, some schools will have even more of an advantage based on what they can pay.
    2. They think that players don’t deserve to be paid simply because they don’t like players.
    I mean, what other arguments are out there? Schools can clearly afford these payments, and so can the NCAA. The player clearly have a marketable and valuable skill. Sports are important enough for coaches to be paid millions of dollars plus perks to manage teams.
    So, what really is the problem? Why does it bother people so much? They don’t want players getting anything else. That is petty man.
    People celebrate hard work and using your talent to advance, but then support arbitrary rules that limit someone’s ability to do that.
    And cats don’t see the cognitive dissonance there at all.

  • http://gmail.com z

    Im glad this debate is being had in more public forums than just slamonline, because its a worthwhile one. The players should definitely be getting a slice of the advertising pie; that’s common sense since they r the reason people tune in to watch. As far as the college paying them, there should be no rules either way (for or.against paying): let it be like the wild west, if you want this player badly enough then compensate said player what you feel they r worth or someone else will. Supposedly thats how merica’s economy works, so let’s apply that philosophy fairly. Of course it goes without saying that the players should have the option to skip college, but stern decided that wasnt good for the quality of play league wide (or maybe, just maybe, the ncaa was pressuring him to stop letting the most talented players bypass their little blaxploitation lol) and outlawed it.

  • bike

    If they pay the players based on profit then the discrepancy between major division one schools, whose athletic programs can afford the large salaries and tremendous benefits that the very best athletes demand, and mid-major teams who simply cannot compete in that arena will only widen. No reason to add another layer of money to this environment. Endorsements from the big companies might be different. A big company isn’t going to pay a player that gets into trouble and the NCAA should not get too jacked up over indirect payments to a player. So let the players that are deserving get a slice of the endorsement pie.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndyfsS0bFK8 nbk

    Now wait, nobody is saying these athletes should be paid like professionals. They should just be paid. I don’t think any one player should be paid an exorbitant amount more than any other. College sports is about team and learning to be responsible. — They should just be compensated enough to live comfortable while they are providing revenue for the school. — $10,000 a season or so for each basketball player would be realistic with how i see this situation.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Wayno
    Let’s be clear. The NCAA is a non-profit organization.
    As such, they are allowed certain tax benefits, and they are allowed to skirt other rules in place for every other corporation.
    If they want to submit to all of those rules, then they can act like a business.
    You can’t claim the benefits without paying the cost.
    Again, that’s totally against all publicly expressed American values.
    You seem to be saying “I’m cool with blatant hypocrisy. Doesn’t bother me at all as long as players don’t get paid.”

  • pposse

    i agree with point 1 AllenP that you made. I can’t say that i agree or disagree with point 2. But point 1 is enough of a reason why I don’t think they should pay athletes.

  • FnF

    I’m on the fence in this issue. “Free education” is a non-factor in this debate. The NCAA provides a platform in which a player gets to market theirself. Think, open mic nights. If a player is good enough, they will generate a buzz, and someone will sign them. If you aren’t good enough, get the fuq off my stage and be lucky I’m not charging you rent. On the flipside all of these “free” performances you’re doing are bringing in customers and I just so happen to be making a profit selling dvds of your routine and concessions. It isn’t slavery, it is simply an unpaid internship.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    NBK
    I had a full ride scholarship, plus the stipend you get from the National Merit people, plus some other minor stuff. And I always got a refund check. And I didn’t make my school any money.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndyfsS0bFK8 nbk

    Allen, cool so you understand what i’m sayin. are you with me, that player’s should just be paid the same amount across the board? or do you think it should depend on “what they provide” as athletes?

  • Hook

    A school coach: “This isn’t pro sports”. Maybe a school coach that receives more money than a pro coach at the NBA. NCAA is slavery and a headache for the talented players. The one year NCAA obligation before the draft doesn’t respect the USA fixation for the free market.

  • The Spaniard

    Let me get this straight, Wayno is arguing that the NCAA has fraudulently set it set up as a non-profit organization and, at the same time, has (unilaterally) set up a set of rules that gives them a unfair advantage over their workforce therefore the athletes (and anyone who supports their position) should shut up and accept it because that’s how it is. Really? This next statement is an extreme, but valid, analogy. Slavery was legal, slaves got compensated for their work with food and shelter. Therefore slaves should have shut up and stayed in their place because that was the legal system and they got whatever the current boss decided they were worth.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    FNF
    1. You don’t have to accept an unpaid internship. There are often paid internships within the same field. Those companies with the proper prestige set their rules on an individual basis. Why not allow schools to do the same thing? Each school decides how it wants to handle athlete pay. The NCAA is made up of independent member organizations, it is not made up of franchises. If a player would rather do an unpaid internship at UNC instead of being paid at North Texas, then that’s his choice. But give him the opportunity to make a choice.

    2. Pposse, inequities in recruiting already exist based on school size. UNC doesn’t recruit like LSU in basketball and LSU doesn’t recruit like UNC in football. This doesn’t increase inequities at all. Schools still are limited in how many scholarships they can offer. They will likely be given a maximum amount they can spend on stipends. But even if they weren’t, since no school would be allowed a monopoly, how would this be different from the way American businesses operate today.
    Google recruits folks from a random internet startup. That’s just how it works.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Spainard
    Exactly homie.
    Like I said, for most cats here it’s either about fear or pettiness.
    Fear that if payment is introduced the talent disparity and gap will only widen. That’s unlikely. Most likely, it will stay the same. There is a fear of more corruption. Again, also unlikely since we all know the system is awash with money. And finally, fear of change.
    The pettiness angle is the idea is based in the idea that people don’t like many of these athletes, resent their ability to get these one-year education and sports contracts, and don’t want them to receive anything else because they think they have enough. There is no valid reason for why they have “enough” in a country that regularly celebrates those citizens who obtain “more” but that’s the way folks feel anyway.
    And then we have to get to why that feeling exists, but that’s a totally different can of worms.

  • IGGI

    @Wayno–FYI there is different forms of slavery!!! You can analyze it how ever you want, but at the end of the day the schools are making a huge profit on the back of these kids.

  • Zabba

    “We would start to see more Dwight Howard situations at colleges”
    And what is wrong with that? Dwight Howard shoulda stayed in college and learned a decent post move or two.

  • The Spaniard

    This school gap point is a non issue because there is ALREADY a massive gap in talent between the top D1 schools and the “mid majors”.

    The problem isn’t that schools aren’t allowed to pay. NO ONE can pay! What kind of sense does that make? I say have all out bidding wars for top talent and if your school can’t pay enough then your school doesn’t field a competing team. The only valid restriction should be academic standing to the university. If the university lowers it academic requirements to allow morons into the school simply to play sports then you will quickly find out about the [lack of] academic integrity of said school.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    I read something a while back that highlighted why the American system of amateur sports (High School + College) is so broken. I don’t remember all of it, but it really highlighted the pros and cons and compared them to the system in Europe. All i do remember from that article is i came away from hit hating how our system is set up over here. it’s just a scheme to make money for those who already have enough while taking advantage of those who think they are getting equal value in education. Education that can be taken away as soon as the player is injured or makes a mistake. Players that play for one year and leave get no benefit out of their college experience for example, but they do generate millions and millions of dollars in that one year they were at the school.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    How does an organization that claims to be only interested in the well-being of someone refuse to allow them to be paid for their services, refuse to allow them to leave a bad work environment for a better one with no penalties and refuse to guarantee them a position beyond a one-year contract?
    But the NCAA is all about the kids.
    I don’t understand how people are so blase about this blatant hypocrisy, and are arguing that it should be allowed to continue. This is similar to lockout situation in that fans are saying that they would rather the entity with all the power and the larger benefit be allowed to maintain that position though any means because… Because what exactly?
    At least with the NBA you could argue that it was simply negotiations between businesses. With the NCAA it’s much different.

  • http://thahiphopcorner.com Kevin

    Yeah let me find out athletes are on campus getting free paychecks for doing the one thing that got them to that school in the first place while getting a free scholarship at the same time. Yeah somebody is getting robbed on campus

  • The Spaniard

    And, by the way, I’m not even suggesting some sort of “conspiracy”. The simple fact is, however the system arrived at this point, an arbitrary set of rules have been set up so that a group of higher ups are compensated as professional in their field, while the workers IN THE SAME FIELD are held to some nonsensical “amateur” classification despite the fact that the top workers draw significant revenue that goes directly to the payments of the people in charge of them. And at the same time there is a near monopoly for these workers to display their trade with the people defined as the valid professional source of income. GTFOH.

  • bike

    The argument that college athletes are not getting paid is ridiculous. They are getting paid – full scholarship, free tuition, which over the course of four years can exceed $200,000. They are also provided with housing, textbooks, food and academic tutoring. When they travel to road games, they are given per diems for meals. They also get coaching, training, game experience and media exposure they “earn” in their respective crafts.
    However, there is a legitimate argument as to whether they should get paid more.

  • http://www.slamonline.com Zucotti Manicotti

    Hey yall! Let’s go play disc golf!!!

  • The Spaniard

    Great Zues! Allenp, I almost forgot that you can’t simply leave a school and play the next semester without penalty nearly 100% of the time.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    bike, no $200,000 scholarship is not a payment. It doesn’t cost the school 200,000 dollars to let a single student sit in classes and turn in homework. Sorry. And everything else in school is paid for. Books are the only “payment” student athletes receive.

  • bike

    nbk, I believe it is a form of payment. If the kid doesn’t get a scholarship, then it will cost him to get an education. The school is footing the tuition bill. Also room and board. What is really being argued is should they get paid more. If so, how exactly is that going to work? Does a third string female vollyball player get the same payment as the starting quarterback?

  • http://www.slamonline.com Chinese Oppenheimer

    Student athletes provide free marketing for major corporations and schools. Why does Coach K and Duke make millions off of shoes and apparel that the players market? I’m not saying the NCAA itself should pay them, but someone needs to compensate the athletes for the money made off of their names and faces. Everyone else gets to profit from their likenesses and images but them.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    They should get paid the same across the board and it shouldn’t exceed 15k dollars a year in addition to their full ride and free food and board.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    bike, the school doesn’t pay tuition for their own student. they just don’t have a tuition. Room and Board is fine, that’s what, 2,000 a semester at the very very maximum? So you the school actually spends $2,500 on a student athlete on scholarship per semester. — How the payments would work out, i’m sure would depend on the sport. If you play football, then you make more than a volleyball player. Now I don’t personally believe teammates should make different amounts, as it is college and not a profession. I just think the athletes should be able to buy new clothes if they need them, or go out to eat something when they have the opportunity. idk, have you ever been around college athletes? have you seen the lives some of them live? It’s not cushy, at all.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    The athletes are not the only reason people tune into games. Many people are watching their alma mater, or their alma mater’s main opponent because they love their old school. The players are not the same in college as they are professionally. They don’t market to the entire world like the pro’s. They should get a slice, just not an overly abundant slice.

  • http://nba.com GP23

    We could argue all day on here… but y’all know the NCAA will never give in. It will always be this way. Hate it or love it.. it’s just the way it is.

  • http://nba.com EJ

    SCHOOL SHOULD BE FREE FOR EVERYONE!!!

  • http://thahiphopcorner.com Kevin

    @nbk damn near the majority of students attending college live that way not just the athletes. Especially if you not on scholarship and paying for school yourself. I’ve been there and still doing it. No sympathy from me on this. Get a job, UPS is hiring

  • bike

    Nbk, there is Title IX, the law that requires men’s and women’s sports teams to be treated equally. If you pay the football players more than the women’s volleyball players, you are discriminating against the women’s team. I understand the problems that some student athletes face that do not have spending money for clothes, dates, transportation etc. That same problem exists for many students who are scrapping by just to get an education. Who ever said college should be cushy?

  • pposse

    its funny how you guys say that the NCAA is making millions off of these kids. It doesnt matter who the kid is, as long as ANY product is out there on the field, court or gym the NCAA will make their millions and billions. It might be misconception but other than almost all football players, its the ‘premodonna’ type athletes that say that they should be getting paid.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Kevin
    they want a job, a job playing basketball or football or whatever. You are arguing that they shouldn’t be allowed to work at the thing they are best at doing. Like I said earlier, you don’t even have to force schools to pay. Just allow them to pay and let schools make the decision on their own. The market will take care of the rest.
    Bike
    You are misreading Title IX. The rule is that you spend similar amount of money on providing sporting opportunities for men and women. It’s not that everything must be equal for every team. If it was, schools would be forced to have women’s football leagues. Every sport would not have to get the same amount of money just like every sport doesn’t receive the same amount of money from the universities currently, and they don’t have the same number of scholarships. You have a misunderstanding of the rules.
    So the basic argument is “Well if other people have to suffer, you should suffer too?”
    Really, that’s the argument Americans are running with here? The same Americans who oppose Affirmative Action or wealth redistribution are arguing that the cream of the crop as far as money producing collegians be restricted from receiving payment for their services because everyone else in college can’t earn that sort of money that easily?
    That’s so laughable it’s sad.
    Like I said, it’s either pettiness or fear. No one has made an argument rooted in anything else yet.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Kevin, obviously you know nothing about college athletics. There is no time for those athletes to get jobs. Hence, they live a worse financial life then many other college students.
    .
    College athletes are not comparable to a run of the mill student, they are comparable to other students on scholarship. Stop comparing them to the average student, it’s not a similar situation. You have to work hard to get an athletic scholarship. You have to work hard to get an academic scholarship. You don’t have to work hard to get accepted into a school. The only difference between a college athlete working hard, and a scholarship student working hard is free time. Students on academic scholarships have the time to earn an income and pay for their non-school related life. Athletes don’t. But athletes are the ONLY students who bring in revenue for their school. So they are basically an unpaid workforce. Or a workforce who is paid far far far under minimum wage. Considering the hours they put in. And again, stop bringing up tuition. The school doesn’t have to pay the tuition for their atheltes, it is just a non-fee. — Which they also get tax breaks for.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    bike, the title ix has nothing to do with this conversation. I didn’t say the football players should be given buses while the volleyball player’s should ride bikes. Giving a stipend to player’s based on what their sport generates has nothing to do with teams being treated equally, it has to do with revenue drawn. Either way, I don’t care if the football players and volleyball players make the same amount, it’s irrelevant. I just think, all athletes who are forced to devote the vast majority of their “free time” to their sport should get something to enable them to live life above what would be comparable to poverty in the US. Since they are making other’s rich in the first place.

  • http://gmail.com z

    Span-iard! Span-iard! Span-iard! Speaking Truth to Pow…well nvm speaking truth to wayno’s conservative ass.

  • http://slamonline.com Wayno

    Sorry, didn’t mean to ditch the convo…apparently door + baby fingers = hospital trip…Now I’m behind on my work.

  • SERBIA

    Definetly no

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    I hope your kid is okay man. I’ve been there before. The only reason I didn’t end up in the hospital was because my wife wasn’t home and I made my little boy suck it up.

  • http://www.fullc0urtpress.com KHOLIDAY

    @NBK, I’m riding with you on this one! I was a student athlete and that sh** is not easy AT ALL. We were up and working from 5am when we had weights until 10:30pm when study hall was over! College athletics is a job! Athletes should be compensated considering the money these schools make off of them!

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    PPosse
    That’s just not true. If the games were horrible, people would stop watching. Just like fans stop paying attention when their schools sports programs suck.

  • http://bulls.com airs

    im always late on the convo
    but i agree with AllenP on the point of they athletes being able to be endorsed by shoe companies.
    what’s wrong about these students receiving endorsements? it is completely unrelated to the university and the player is able to independently earn money, i don’t see a drawback.
    if other companies believe a player is worth endorsement money, why are universities able to get in their way?

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Kholiday, i tried to respond idk if it just didn’t go through or what, it was a long comment. But i totally understand. i started off college on the basketball team, just couldn’t do it because of all the time it took up, and everything i would have had to sacrifice to red shirt.

  • pposse

    look, if you start to pay athletes, this opens up a huge can of worms. Who gets paid? How much should they get paid? Who will govern this system of payments? How many other Director/Presidential jobs will now command 6-7 figure salaries to manage all of the individuals who need to get paid. Do you open up an HR department now for employee complaints? I mean the list goes on and on. Will these ‘employees’ now be prone to making up sexual harrassment charges against their coaches now that they have a little taste of money? What about legal representation, how much more will universities have to pay for that? This list can go on and on. How do universities deal with the backlash? To me, the most sensible thing to do is to break off the athlete a certain percentage if their jersey is getting bought (or anything with their name on it), but if you do that then your amateur status is lost i think..so the rules would have to change. Its just waay to much of a headache for me to see this really happening. Hell, what about jealousy from other students? These are kids we are talking about, not mature adults. What if they boycott sporting events?

  • LA Huey

    If players can’t get paid, the salaries of coaches and ADs should be capped. Nobody in positions of power in non-profit, amateur athletics should be allowed 7 figure salaries. The profits generated by the NCAA should be funneled back into grants and scholarships for qualifying students. That should balance things out. Though I think players should be compensated with more tuition + room & board for a year.

  • http://www.fullc0urtpress.com KHOLIDAY

    @nbk, its all good… I see a lot of ppl feel free tuition and room and board are enough, but you can’t put a price on the time and effort it takes to be a part of a program, especially a Divion I program. Granted the free education is awesome, but the work you have to put in is crazy! We pretty much dedicate those 4 years of our lives to the school and sport. You miss Thanksgivings and major holidays with your family. You miss summers because you’re taking classes. You miss the major school events because you’re on the road for games. You miss a ton because once you sign that scholarship paper every year, those teammates become your family and your time belongs to the program! It isn’t easy at all.

  • LA Huey

    pposse, your argument about the can of worms is silly. That’s like saying “If we let the coloreds and women vote how will we keep track of all this? We’ll have to hire personnel to handle the increase in voter registration and ballots. Good lawd!”

  • Decatur Don

    If I was a student athlete I’d get my money by any means like OJ and Reggie was getting theirs….I could give two damns about “Integrity”

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Holiday Slam won’t let me respond. This website is such a mess. There are non-full-ride athletes who have it even worse. I’m trying to explain the situation some of my teammates were gonig through, but no matter how i type it, it won’t go through.

  • pposse

    Huey, i think its relevant (some of it is far fetched…for dramatic effects). If my company was making billions, but now the bottom line is my company making millions (as opposed to billions), i am going to do whatever it takes to get back in the billions. Whether that means raising ticket prices, team merchandise etc etc.

  • bobbyD

    Yeah definitely pettiness or envy. You know, I have to so why shouldn’t they? But the thing is, they aren’t you. There’s no argument that student athletes are generating significant revenue due to their endeavours. Free education? It’s not free. I’d look at it as compensation in place of renumeration. As nbk mentioned it’s costing the universities a fraction of the revenue generated. A student that generates zero revenue for the university and has to pay for their education isn’t the same as a student athlete. As Allenp keeps reiterating, yes student athletes should be entitled to renumeration. How much is debatable, but the fact that they are shouldn’t.

  • http://slamonline.com Wayno

    Thanks, he’s good. They didn’t need to stitch him up. Now i just have to keed his hands out of his mouth.

  • FnF

    @AllenP, I’m indifferent on this issue. The current system won’t change unless professional leagues intervene. Because they are provided free scouting reports, player marketing (Tebow), and player development they are fine with letting the NCAA exist as is. Even if proleagues did step in, they simply aren’t big enough to make a difference. 62 NFL and NBA teams… 300 DI schools. The players worth paying at the college level most likely will get paid at the pro level. They rocked the crowds during open mic nights and got signed on the spot. The NCAA is too big to fail.

  • hillbilly

    @allenp My argument is poor? Maybe that’s because it’s not really an argument at all. Maybe you should learn how to actually read something instead of assuming that you already know everything. I was simply stating a fact. If you’re in college and you need money, go out and find yourself a damn job. If you’re not averse to hard work or getting your hands dirty, you’ll be just fine.
    Some of you guys are arguing that college athletes deserve to be paid because they’re bringing in millions of dollars to their respective universities. ‘OMG! It’s so unfair! These kids are being treated like slaves!’ Okay, let’s say you pay these student athletes a fair ‘wage’ for their services. Who’s gonna pick up the tab for that? Will it be passed along to other students (non-athletes) and their parents in the form of higher tuition? You bet it will. Life, believe it or not, is routinely unfair (and not just for athletes). So, you can cry all you want for these poor, pitiful kids who play ball, get treated like rock stars and rarely put any effort into studying something useful while they’re in college. I have no sympathy for them because I live in the real world where I work 60+ hours a week, saving lives for a living. I support my wife and kids, pay the bills, etc. That’s just what I do. What I DON’T do is play a child’s game and expect to be paid for it. But, I’m sure that’s just another “poor argument” from the uneducated working class, right? So, I’ll keep on living here in the real world and you can continue to reside comfortably in your own little fantasyland where everyone’s an entitled candyass. Fair enough?

  • http://www.fullc0urtpress.com KHOLIDAY

    @nbk, slam is trying to silence you huh? LOL! I went to a D-III my first year, so I know how it feels to bust my @$$ and still pay my own tuition. I finished out college at a D-I and still felt like I was killing myself, even with not having to worry about my tuition. I completely agree with you though. I’ve been on both sides of the coin and it’s work. Those non scholarship guys get it worse! Def hard work either way tho

  • http://bulls.com airs

    hillbilly
    you’re right, life isn’t fair and it sounds like you’re super bitter about it.
    though what you do is commendable, why are you entitled to belittle a professional athlete for doing what HE does for a living? thats just what they do.

  • bobbyD

    Yeah definitely “entitled” to be petty.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Pposse
    You sound like you’re arguing “Keep screwing the players because it’s easier.” I mean, when did that become the measure of how we conduct business?
    Hillbilly
    Your argument was that players should go out and find a job. The argument was poor because the NCAA and their schools regulate what type of job they can find, and strictly prohibit them from being paid to use their most profitable skill. That would be playing sports.
    You said you were in med school and became an EMT. Was that by chance, or was your decision to become an EMT tied to the fact that you were in med school? Did you decide to use the skillset you already had, your basic knowledge of several different sciences and burgeoning knowledge of medicine to get employed? Your example would have been relevant if the med school you attended said that no one was allowed to work as an EMT or nurse while in med school because that would corrupt their understanding of how to be a med student.
    That’s what the NCAA tells student athletes.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    I think some of you don’t understand how much money is generated by programs at some schools.
    More importantly, some of you have appeared to misunderstand my argument despite how many times I’ve repeated it.
    Here it is again.
    Schools SHOULD NOT be forced to pay students. Schools SHOULD be allowed to pay students.
    They SHOULD NOT be forced to give students four year scholarships. They SHOULD be allowed to have that option available to offer.
    Basically, stop restricting athletes ability to get the best possible deal for their services from a university. The current system gives universities all of the power in the relationship and it’s done in an underhanded way and it does NOT protect students. That’s the NCAA’s stated mission here people. They are supposed to protect student athletes. The current system does not do that, which Wayno has already admitted.
    Again, who thinks the current system is the best system for athletes, or that it protects their interests? Somebody make that argument.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Hillybilly
    You seem angry.
    If the government instituted rules governing where doctors had to live, work and how much they could or could not get paid for their services, you would be understandably upset. This is America, and we’re not supposed to have laws that limit your ability to maximize the skills you’ve worked hard to acquire particularly when people place a high value on those skills.
    I don’t think running an investment bank is a skill that benefits most people in America. However, someone clearly values investments banks enough to pay their officers huge sums of money to do those jobs. I don’t think being the CEO of Apple is worth being paid $378 million annually in compensation, but the people at Apple do because that’s what the CEO made in 2011.
    If you don’t think being a basketball player is worth a lot of money, than you SHOULD NOT pay them a lot of money. But instead of doing that, by refusing to watch them or make their enterprises profitable, you instead argue that they should be restricted from making money at the college level. Because they clearly have enough and their jobs, no matter how much money and interest they generate, are not that important.
    That’s blatantly un-American. And I would wager you have a far different attitude when it involves just about everyone else who isn’t an athlete.
    Fans kill me. People pay a crazy amount of attention to sports, they argue and bicker over sports, they spend huge sums of money on sports, but then they say “Oh, well they shouldn’t be worried about money because what they do isn’t important.”
    Well your actions tell a totally different story.

  • bike

    Maybe I am missing something but back in my day an athletic scholarship to a well-respected university was highly coveted. Still is. Thousands of kids are killing themselves in high school and even in grade school to get to the level where they are good enough to play sports for a major college. It may be the only way they can get a college education. Isn’t that the dream of many an inner-city kid—to be able to get an education that he/she cannot afford by playing the sport they love? So I will grant that it’s tough for a student athlete in many ways but what is the actual ratio of the kids who were grateful for the opportunity against those that felt they got shafted?

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    I would imagine that many kids will be happy with not getting paid.
    I would imagine that other kids will want to get paid.
    And schools will decide just how important it is to them to attract top flight talent, or if they would rather stick with the model of not paying athletes.
    The NCAA doesn’t want that to happen. Hell, schools don’t want that to happen. Schools protested against the possibility of allowing four year scholarships. You know why? It wasn’t because of cost, it was because they felt that if a player got injured, not being able to terminate his contract would make it harder to compete athletically. ESPN reported this and even noted that Boise State was one of the schools make that argument.
    If a player is content with just an education, great for him. If a player would rather have that education AND a stipend, good for him as well.

  • Yep

    lol @ equating this to slavery. What a joke.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Kids are shown college athletes playing on TV and are told by their TV how fortunate those athletes are. When those kids get to college and realize life is no easier as a college athlete than it was before, and learn about how much money is being made off of them, they are likely to feel shafted or confused. Or they are likely to take something under the table. Which has happened thousands upon thousands of times in the past. before the internet revolution and widespread awareness of these situations became available the issue of how much profit was being made off of student athletes was largely covered up or misrepresented by universities and those that make money off of them. The world has changed, it’s ok for how we view collegiate athletics to change as well.

  • bike

    Wouldn’t giving schools the option to offer stipends require close monitoring by the NCAA? Is that what college athletics needs more of? Can you imagine giving someone like Calipari the option of attaching cash to a scholarship offer?

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    It wouldn’t require any different monitoring than the current system. The current system says no money allowed and if we see money or evidence of money you’re in trouble.
    The new system would say that only a certain amount of money is allowed and if we see evidence of too much money you’re in trouble.
    Same system, same principles.

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    @ hillbilly. Since you’ve completed med school, I was just wondering what your stance is on resident doctors being paid while technically still being students? Same goes for articling students.

  • http://www.nba.com/knicks danpowers

    oh come on guys. playing college ball as a good player will get them their money after college. if they cant make it to the nba theyd still be able to earn more money than the average academic by playing ball abroad

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    no they wouldn’t

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Playing abroad does not yiel nearly as much money as people seem to think. Like 15 – 30 thousand a season for an average american player.

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    @ danpowers, annually? Probably. But let’s not forget their window of opportunity to make a living as a professional athlete is what, 7 years on average and 15 years max?

  • http://www.slamonline.com AT

    I dont think its smart to give college students possibly millions of dollars.What should happen is they get a financial consultant for those that already have a future set in the nba.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    WHOEVER SAID TO GIVE THEM MILLIONS?

  • http://bulls.com airs

    Still don’t understand why ppl would be opposed to students receiving outside endorsement money.
    Someone please tell me how that wouldn’t work

  • http://www.nba.com/knicks danpowers

    @Da-Meat-Hook: as a professional coach, gm, assistant, scout, special trainer, etc you can still earn some nice money after a players carreer. @nbk: where r these 15-30k a year players going to then? over here in germany top players earn up to 500k a year and role guys about 100k a year. and germany doesnt have a very strong league compared to greece, spain or turkey. idk but i think it should be a little bit more than 15-30k

  • davidR

    hillbilly,
    it’s great that you save lives for a living, but why complain about how much someone else makes, or what they do? in this case (college hoops), there is a HUGE market and demand for the student athlete’s services, therefore they generate all that money. you say it’s a child’s game, yet they probably work just as hard or even harder than you do to compete at such a high level.
    also, i don’t know why you’re so angry/jealous. it was the coaches (you know, the ones that are ACTUALLY paid) that were polled, not the students (the ones in question). maybe you should read a little more carefully, cuz i don’t see where the students are complaining.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Dan, where are you getting those numbers? — I currently play on a team with a guy who plays in Iceland during the season – he makes no more than 75K. He’s a heavy minute player who i believe led his squad in scoring. — Another friend of mine just came back from the Netherlands to for an office job in the US that would start out at more money then he was making over there. And he’s making no more than 50K at his new job. – not that i don’t believe you about Germany, the economy is huge, a larger average salary over there would make sense. — And I wasn’t talking about top players, or top leagues, i was talking about average players in the average foreign league. I know they don’t make as much as you’d expect. Especially those guys in the Asian markets because of how heavily they are taxed to bring the money back to the US. — All of this, and most foreign leagues have a cap on American players per team, which means there are less jobs available over seas than one would typically expect for a former collegiate basketball player.

  • http://www.nba.com/knicks danpowers

    i jus did some more research, my bad. i saw that vets normally get 50k over here per year even if they dont play much. top players earn between 200 to 500 k per year. but even those who earn 50k or less have a good living as the teams gift them cars n provide them flats n food so they could really save / invest some of their money opposed to an average academic who works for a company n has to pay for everything on his own. i also thought most european or asian countries pay more money because basketball is unfortunatelly not popular in germany and many countries got stronger leagues than we do. i hear you on what you stated, i really didnt expect this situation to be that difficult.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    if these guys were to stay overseas and not actually live back in the US their situations would be much better, because, as you said, the teams regularly pay for all expenses overseas. It’s just coming back home and dealing with taxes and normal bills that make the situation so difficult. ANd trust me, i thought they made way way more money then they did, and even said some totally ignorant sh*t to one of them about how much they were making. I felt like a total ass when he set me straight. This was a couple years ago, and i didn’t have the sense to discuss the situation, i just made a bunch of assumptions.

  • http://www.newyorkshockexchange.com/content/view/424/37/ Shock Exchange

    This is the equivalent of saying “sun should rise in the west.” It’s never going to happen, at least not in our lifetime. The NCAA knows that this very subject is a “pandora’s box,” once you open it, you can never close it. Secondly, decades ago, (i) athletes used to get paid to play for colleges and (ii) they played for multiple schools. Moreover, the NCAA went through several machinations to keep them from being paid and keep them from switching teams.

  • http://www.nba.com/knicks danpowers

    can imagine that this wasnt too much of a nice conversation. i am a bit suprised that it aint too easy for us college players overseas. then f**k what i said, let them get paid at college! lol

  • http://www.slamonline.com nbk

    Lol, not saying you shouldn’t pursue it, my boys had or are having a lot of fun, they just don’t get paid what I expected

  • http://www.nba.com/knicks danpowers

    sure i think bein a pro athlete is like living the dream even if it aint the nba. but when it is like this id really say they should be paid or at least be allowed to take endorsements like flats or cars by their teams. would be very difficult to make that legal in a reasonable and fair way

  • http://www.nba.com/knicks danpowers

    + though

  • http://www.nba.com/knicks danpowers

    by their college teams i meant. dang its late. im out, hve a good one

  • http://www.slamonline.com nbk

    Have a good one

  • That Dude

    Cosign everything Allenp has said. Preach it brother.

  • Maxx

    the death penalty in college athletics is for paying players, just as it was for run away slaves LMAO. the only sports dominated by black atheltes are the only ones generating money and somehow there is an issue in proper compensation for their fair market value. smh these boys NEED to be paid. this would advance the black community in a number of ways. PAY THEM end of discussion. they generate absolutely too much money for white owned and operated universities and cities for them not to see any of the profits. And mind u some of them still have to come out of pocket for their scholarships due to the short comings of their scholarship the NCAAP which is a weak and small players union has a pamphlet whichs spells all of this out. College Basketball and College Football is DOMINATED by black athletes, pay them dammit!!!!!!

  • theOracle

    they ARE getting paid. they are getting a college education for free!! college costs a fortune for most ppl. why should they get paid too? thats crazy. the divide between student athletes and the rest of the students is already there. this would create a lot more tension.
    the ONLY reason college coaches want players to get paid is too keep the good ones from going pro early. playing collegiate sports is a privilege, not a job.

  • Drew

    Why on earth should they be paid? They’re not soldiers, they’re playing basketball for christ sake. They get a free college education that should be more than enough. The world has gone crazy.

  • The Spaniard

    Wow! Tension between athletes and students? HAHAHAHAHA! Are we at the cusp of a violent civil war between jocks and nerds? Give me a break. Is working at the library computer lab as an IT Support Tech a “privilege”? The bottom line is this…athletes at certain schools are the primary generator of an enormous amount of income and they are restricted from receiving income from ANY source whatsoever while their coaching staff and athletic department can receive money from nearly ANY source whatsoever. Why? Because the people in control of of making the rules are the same people that directly benefit from this free labor setup. And some of you idiots think that this serves to keep sports “pure” from “recruiting violations” or is some form of legitimate capitalism. First of all allowing someone to receive money from a outside source IS the recruiting violation so that “issue” would be eliminated can secondly, go read Wealth of Nation and see exactly what Adam Smith has to say about allowing the masters of commerce and the wealth to be the rule makers at the same time.

  • WEASAL

    if compensation happens there is no more Butler or George Mason or gonzaga.
    although john calipari would not have to be bending over all the time…(Hey Anthony you dropped your wallet why don’t you come to kentucky)

  • Chris_Griff_3

    If they get paid, then they are technically professionals. Going to school is a choice. Not a job. If they want to get paid instead of going to school, overseas is an option.

  • Chris_Griff_3

    NCAA shouldn’t pay them, nor should the school, itself. Athletes should be allowed to earn money (and gifts), be it through an endorsement or whatever.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    I don’t care how you allow them to earn money, just allow them to earn money.
    And if being paid makes you a professional, does that mean Missy Franklin can’t accept her medal bonus from the Olympics, or the training stipend from the Swimming committee because then she’s technically paid to play her sport before she attends college? I’m honestly curious because it appears that is not an issue.
    It’s also funny how often people denigrate the idea of being paid to actually play college sports, but have no problem with Coach K and Calipari and Lane Kiffin getting paid millions to COACH sports. Is there some bid difference in importance between coaching and playing?

  • CoachB

    College athletes DO get paid…it’s called a scholarship and can be worth $200,000!! Lets not forget that the top college athletes can also leave early & make millions. Oh wait, only men & only certain sports. This idea of paying college athletes is ABSURD and I say that having been one & coaching them. It’s the problem with our culture today. 5 yr olds with iPhones, 10 year olds getting allowances and paid for grades. It’s absurd.

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