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Thursday, May 10th, 2012 at 10:30 am  |  69 responses

“People Would Go Crazy Over These Shoes”

We sat down with Allen Iverson to discuss the return of the Question, and much more.

by Tzvi Twersky | @ttwersky

Everyone, regardless of whether or not they’ve actually met him, has an Allen Iverson story. Todd Krinsky, a man who’s spent the better part of his adult life working with AI, has a memory bank full of them.

“The first first first time we ever met him, I’ll never forget, he was wearing this gray linen suit,” Krinsky, VP of Reebok Classics, Entertainment and Basketball, says of the brand’s first meeting with Iverson. “He’s like an hour and a half late. We were waiting on him, waiting on him. We had something like that [points to an early sample of the Question] already going, so we kind of told him, ‘When you were a sophomore at Georgetown we were developing this shoe for you.’ We didn’t show it to him at the first meeting, we showed it to him the second meeting. But I remember the first meeting, he came in, there was kind of like an aura to him. He had a presence. He walked into the room and it was like he had this swagger and he had this cachet right away. It wasn’t something he tried.”

Suffice it to say, 16 years, 24,368 points, and millions of tales later, Allen Iverson still has that aura about him, still commands a room when he enters it. This was never clearer than on a rainy day in Atlanta in mid-April, when Iverson joined an intimate group of people for an afternoon of conversation.

Before that could begin, though, before Iverson—who, lack of cornrows aside, still hides the same sinewy body in oversized sweats that he did when he was an All-Star game regular—could talk until the sun was down and his voice was hoarse, an exciting announcement had to be made: on May 25, 2012, Reebok is bringing AI’s first shoe, the Question, back.

One of the iconic sneakers of the ’90s, the Question was worn by AI throughout his rookie season in 1996. He had them on during his first career game, when he dropped 30. He had them on when he double-crossed Michael Jordan. And he had them on when he went on an unprecedented run of five 40-plus point games in a row in the dying months of his first season. Basically, he had them on when he captured the attention of a basketball nation. For that reason—and many others, including the shoe’s unique detailing—the Question maintains an exalted status in the sneaker world.

“Just so many people ask, ‘When are you coming back with the Questions, man?’” says Iverson, between sips of an iced tea that he managed to nurse for hours. “I mean, I was in Charlotte, I was at a Friday’s, and a guy called his brother and told him I was up there. Man, he brought a pair up to the restaurant for me to sign that he had never worn. That was two months ago.”

The re-release on May 25—a one-time drop of the white/red colorway—will be the original Question’s first time on shelves since it’s initial launch a decade and a half ago. They will cost $125.

“He’s a lot more engaged now,” says Krinsky, “a lot more understanding of his legacy. If we had said, ‘Hey, we’re bringing back the Question’ three or four years ago he probably would have been like, ‘All right, cool.” Now he wants to talk about it, he wants to know [things like], Are we doing a girls colorway? He wants to be involved more, he wants to know what the plans are.”

As for his own personal plans—he is currently playing on an exhibition tour in China and hopes to play there in a professional capacity next season—Iverson (as well as Krinsky; Brian Lee, Reebok Director of Basketball; and Gary Moore, AI’s agent) shared that and so much more.

On football, Georgetown and tough love from Coach John Thompson:

Iverson: “I remember when I got there—football was my first love—when I used to walk to the gym, I had to pass the football field. It was a DIII team, but I had to pass the football field every day. I would try to do all kinds of thing to psych myself out, mind you I’m 19 years old. I would walk a different way to the gym, so I wouldn’t have to see the football field, so I wouldn’t have to see the players. I remember I didn’t want to walk the long way,  so I used to walk and close my eyes and stuck my hand out till I got to the door so I wouldn’t have to look at the field. That is how bad I was missing football. I was playing basketball, but I was missing football that much.

“One day I had the courage, I dunno—I guess it was eating at me so much. I lost my mind and went to the weight room and said, ‘Coach, can I talk to you for a minute?’ He said, ‘Yeah, you can speak to me. What’s going on?’ I said, ‘Look, what do you think about me playing football?’ He said, ‘I’ll tell you what I think about you playing football. If you don’t get your skinny black ass the eff out of my face…you better.’ (Laughs) Just like that. I never thought about playing football again after that. I mean, he made it clear that this is not why I was here.

“Just being 18, 19 and being recruited by every team in the world, like every college, in both sports, and then an incident happens, and all of them go away. All of them (laughs). I’m not talking—take away 50 (laughs). Take away 100 if you want to. But all of them? Man.

“My mom came up there one day, I just remember crying. ‘Mom, it’s over for me like that? Nobodies dealing with me? You ain’t getting no letters coming to the house or nothing?’ All of them stopped. All of them.

“She went up there [to Georgetown], and cried to him [Coach Thompson], begged to him, to give me a chance. He’ll tell me to this day: ‘Son, I wasn’t going to take you if you’re mom hadn’t come up here and talked to me. No way.’”

On the speculation that surrounded whether he would be the No. 1 overall pick in the Draft:

Iverson: “I felt that I would be picked No. 1. I had a pretty good indication that it would be that. But you really don’t know until they call your name so you still have a little doubt.”

Krinsky: It’s funny, because when we first did the deal that’s what Foot Locker was saying, too. They were like, He’s too small, it’s not gonna work—and they were talking about the shoe game.”

On there being a sense of added pressure because he went first in a deep Draft:

Iverson: “Come to think of it, it never crossed my mind. I was so confident in what I can do that it didn’t bother me. I knew if I was given the opportunity to play, just given the minutes, then the production would be there. And then I was so young, and in my mind I’m thinking, Damn, I don’t have to deal with no box-and-ones, I don’t have to deal with no zones. You know what I mean, a guy got to guard me all night, one-on-one; there’s no way possible that can happen.  The only person I felt that could stop me was myself and just having an off night. So I didn’t really feel pressure.

“I remember the first time playing against Mike [Jordan]. Like, you’re just out there with him, and he’s your idol. You look up to him; he’s the reason you play basketball. And, then, you’re just standing beside him, waiting for the jump ball. I just remember I couldn’t stop looking at him, like, the way he had his uniform on, I’m looking at his socks—he didn’t have the NBA socks on, which we’d get fined for not wearing them (laughs). He didn’t have the NBA socks on, and I’m just looking at him. He didn’t even look real, man, I’m telling you.

“Soon as the ball went up, all that was out of here. Aww my God. I was just thinking to myself, Look, everyone in the world know who he is and what he can do; tonight, they’re gonna see what you can do too. When the people go home they’re gonna remember No. 3 and No. 23. It wasn’t nothing cocky about it. We were just competitors. I just want to win—I don’t care if it’s Monopoly, chess, checkers, anything you do, I’m just real competitive. I think that’s what I do best, so obviously I was going to give it all I had.”

On wearing the Reebok Question that first season:

Iverson: “I still get asked about the white/red Question.”

Krinsky: “The original. This is the one we launched 5,000 pairs in Philly only; it sold out in like two minutes. I’ll never forget this, I remember calling him, it was like the eighth game of the season, this is before the internet, kids were driving from Virginia, driving from Pittsburgh, they were driving from everywhere to get a pair. It, like, evaporated. I remember calling him, ‘Yo, your stuff completely sold out.’ He’s like, ‘huh?’ I was like, ‘every pair is gone.’”

On crossing over Michael Jordan while wearing the Question:

Iverson: “Everybody talks about that one when they first meet me. ‘Man, I still remember the play you shook Jordan.’ Everybody gonna always remember it because it was Jordan. And, you know, Mike’s probably been shook before—somebody probably got him before—but right there, at the top of the key like that, with everybody watching. That’s the only reason I did it the second time is because I seen how hard he bit when I wasn’t even doing a move, I was setting a move up. I said, ‘oh, he’s biting hard.’”

On memories from the first ad campaign:

Krinsky: “We didn’t have a lot of athletes, this was our first real guy. Shaq never really was like—we had a lot of shoes, but they were never really huge commercial successes. AI was the first one, we didn’t really know how to react to like 5,000 kids from different urban areas just buying the shoe. We didn’t know. And we didn’t really know how to ramp up for it. So then after the first 5,000, then we started to make the mass one to go all over the country. It was really new for the company. What I remember it was just a totally new experience—we hadn’t really reached that consumer in the past, AI was really the first time we reached that urban consumer. And they were buying the shoe, people really liked the style of the shoe and obviously the excitement of AI. But it was one of those moments that you can only recreate probably a couple times in your career.”

On his growing understanding of the sneaker business, and how people reacted to his shoes:

Krinsky: “The funniest thing about it is, the first year he’d be like, ‘Can I get this in blue?’ We’d be like, ‘yeah,’ and I’d tell him it would take two or three weeks, because he didn’t really know. When we got to this point, he knew how long it took, but he’d be like, ‘T, you can do that in a week.’ (Laughs) We’d be killing the factory, killing the factory.”

Iverson: “I just remember having my sneakers, and after every game somebody from the other team would ask me for ’em—for his son, his cousin, his niece. So after a while, I basically knew that after every game the shoes was gone. Then I got to the point where I started to throw them in the crowd after the game, or after I knew the game was going to be over. I mean, man, people would go crazy over these shoes.”

On how his style on and off the court impacted a generation of players, and want that means to him:

Iverson: “I noticed that throughout my career. But I get it from guys off the basketball court, too. I would see ’em, and they would tell me stories about how they had my picture up on their wall, and in their locker and stuff like that. That’s the greatest feeling in the world. Just for somebody that young—you know, LeBron and all those guys, Dwyane Wade—to grow up looking up to me, and all these guys wanting to wear No. 3 because I wore it, words can’t explain how that makes you feel. If you obviously had that impact on them,  you must have accomplished great things.

“That was one of the most important things for me. Looking back, you feel good about kids looking up to you like that. But back then, I was so young and headstrong and rebellious to so many things that, looking at it now, some of those things I wish I could take back. The rap album, the song, all of that, and some of the antics. You wish you could take it back, but you can’t.”

On watching games, how tough that is and where his skill level is currently at:

Iverson: “Yeah, [it's tough], especially when I know I can do what I do. I know I can play. Am I as quick and as fast as I was 15 years ago? Who is (laughs)? I think the hardest time I’m having with it is being healthy like this. I ain’t never been to where don’t nothing hurt, don’t nothing bother me. I wish there was a season where I was playing and didn’t have no aches, no pains, no bruises, no nothing. Just feeling like this right now, I would love the opportunity to do it.

“Yeah. If I get out there and you see I’m not moving around like I used to—I’m not gonna get out there and embarrass myself like that (laughs). Ain’t no way I’ma do that. I wouldn’t even do that to myself, like to put myself through that, to where people are saying, ‘He lost a step.’ Like, I might have lost one, but I didn’t lose two, three, four, five steps.”

On his lifetime deal with Reebok:

Krinsky: “I think, honestly, we thought that the retro business for him would be a little bigger at this point. But we’ve really had an interesting relationship with him, no BS. There’s a real relationship with Allen and the brand, so we felt like we wanted to be able to continue that, and as long as we’re selling his product he’ll benefit from it financially. We never wanted to see him go somewhere else because we just want him to be a part of who we are. So we just negotiated something where we’ll always be together regardless of where he is.”

On what’s in store for the future:

Iverson: “Man, that’s what I want to do. Go over there [China] and play.”

Gary Moore: “What I’m doing now is focusing on him leaving the way he deserves.”

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  • Marc

    AI was one of my favorite guards because of his heart.

  • AsadSaleh3

    My favorite all-time player. First ballot Hall of Famer. Second greatest little man to play the game behind Isiah Thomas.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    I never copped a pair of these shoes. I might pony up the money this time.

  • Daniel

    Iverson was always my favorite player, even after I got to be taller than him. Just loved the attitude, the heart, and the reckless style of play. I didn’t have a pair of questions, but I did get a later pair of all black Iversons that I wore for years.

  • http://slamonline.com Ben Osborne

    Awesome stuff, Tzvi. Very smart of Reebok.

  • http://www.couponspicy.com alanc230

    Hope my 14-year-old son doesn’t hear about these shoes. He’s sure to want a pair, and I’m sure I don’t want to pay for them.

  • http://bebe310.blogspot.com/ anonymous

    Miss this cat for real. (check out the link)

  • http://www.xhamster.com Danger Powers

    “killing the factory” lol

  • Top$helf

    My favorite player of all time because of the way he played and the fact he never changed stayed true to who he was (prolly was he doesn’t have a job now) I used to get into heated arguments almost fist fights defending AI that’s my man 100 grand I had the all black joints with the gold trim the solid white ones and the turquoise and blue joints

  • Jesse

    Great look Tzvi! I could read AI stories all day!

  • fruizm

    “That’s the only reason I did it the second time is because I seen how hard he bit when I wasn’t even doing a move, I was setting a move up. I said, ‘oh, he’s biting hard.’”…BEAST!

  • http://www.dimemag.com Showtime

    The second G>O>A>T. in scoring..Dude was that Dude and i do rememeber being in 5 grade when these drop.Got the reds and the blue just because i wasn’t able to get the 11′s at that time.

  • bmorezbest

    you can never say nothing bad bout AI my dude brought it every night no matter who you was he was gonna go at you period. I would love to see him get one more shot in the L so he can go out in style.

  • http://slamonline.com/ Abe Schwadron

    Owned at least 3 pairs from ages 10-14. All absolutely destroyed from hooping in them. Amazingly comfortable shoe. Great stuff, Tzvi.

  • blackthought

    man, remember the answer 1 from 1997, had them in shinny blue, with the gold stitchings on – still my favorite beside the jordans.

  • http://slamonline.com YKnot

    Still have mine! I wonder if NBATV will broadcast some CBA games if he signs?

  • Khari

    I had 3 different pair of the original Questions. Most comfortable ball sneakers I ever owned. I had the chance to be around and talk to Allen a lot when I was in college at Hampton. Not long conversations but enough. I worked at a shoe store where he and sometimes his mother shopped often. They would come in and buy up lots of shoes and gear and take it to the community center for the kids, great stuff. He was always a quiet but cool and approachable dude.

  • Maila

    You can tell AI career is done ….He would never do a long interview like this in his prime , he was too busy chasing women and liqour …Its a shame how alcohol and drugs can ruin a person of his greatness ….Oh, Gary Moore is his agent ?thats laughable ..One last note , AI get yourself ina rehab and start taking care of your kids ..BEST WISHES

  • http://www.slamonline.com Parry

    Bonafide first ballot hall of famer easily one of the greatest to ever do it,,, still extremely underrated…6 foot! 6 damn feet tall! anyone that know the game well knows how hard it is and he went down in my opinion as one of the 25 greatest

  • BlackNicholson

    I use to leave my ball in the car with my question 1′s. I live in tx now so I had the orange pair. Someone broke in my car, left my clarion stereo(it was about 500 bucks at the time) and my basketball. The only thing they took were my shoes. That shit still hurts!!!!
    Even thieves loved the question 1′s…..

  • SDC

    I’m a Sixers (and basketball) fan because of him, never thought he could fadeaway so fast from the NBA, but I’m not ready to give up on him yet, HOF talent and will, best 6 footer of All-Time.

  • http://www.facebook.com/joe.l.brewer3 BlackPhantom

    Maaaan, my dad bought me a pair of Questions for my 9th Birthday….probably the best pair of shoes I’ve ever worn.

  • Lower East Scribe

    Good stuff, homie. I’d love to see A.I. get one last shot in the league and retire the right way. Hopefully it’s not too late. Glad he’s playing in China though, that’s a good look.

  • brews

    wheres that greek dude that used to always come here n call AI the cartoon or something? I miss laughing at his hysterical criticisms of “the cartoon.”

  • jake

    Hell.YES! I’m buying two Pairs of these. I’ve been hunting for a size 13 since 2003 when my first pair wore out. Now Adidas needs to re launch the t Mac 2!

  • IDOT

    Stern need to stop blackballing NBA teams not to sign him and let that man finish his career out the right way.

  • titanic

    Glad to hear that Iverson hasnt allowed the nba to decide when his career is over. barring a career-ending injury, every athlete should be given the opportunity to decide when theyre ready to call it quits. I saw some videos of Iverson in China during this 2 wk promo, after being more than a year removed from competitive basketball, and he looks better than I would of thought. Rusty as h*** but excited about working himself back into game shape so he can compete at the highest level again. AI still got that confident swagger about him and he can still ball. dude just has a fire about him that no one can put out. Im aching to see Iverson back in the nba next season. must go down.

  • http://www.thenewsvault.com Tim Tebow

    Once their respective careers are over who would you say was better – Iverson or Wade?

  • Young C

    Man, this aint the first time the white and red questions have been re-released. Back in 02-03 me and my whole JV squad had a pair of these. Who are they kidding?

  • http://slamonline.com The Philosopher

    The greatest of all time off the dribble.

  • J

    ALLEN IVERSON was the most entertaining and fearless player, his talent and determination was incredible.
    AI belongs in the NBA! He still has so much to give, most players in the league today do not give 100% on the court the way IVERSON did!
    It is so sad to see the media repeat the “Practice” rant over and over, as if that is what AI should be remembered for, so disrespectful!
    Shame on the NBA for letting AI slip away to play for other countries, when there are players in the league who don’t compare to him

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    I sincerely hope to see this guy back in the NBA next season, but even if he plays elsewhere, like in the CBA or something, I still wish him the best. He’ll be fine. China will love him, btw.

  • James

    Nice interview, AI had great heart for game time and showed it’s the size of the fight in the dog!

    ‘bmorezbest’ is right with his double negative, you can say something bad about AI – he never adapted to what it takes to win in the NBA. Practice DOES matter! The fact the Sixers made the Finals was such a testament to the coaching of Larry Brown, finding a way to shape those guys around such a specialised player and letting AI do his thing and still have a winning team……amazing.

  • http://bebe310.blogspot.com/2012/04/david-stern-and-espn-have-destroyed.html djb

    I know what you mean @J. espn rarely even mentions Allen Iverson`s name without linking him to some cynical, legal, or satirical tale regarding an alleged addiction or a lawsuit or that played-out practice interview. I mean with all Iverson has done throughout his career and they choose to celebrate the anniversary of a single interview??? espn along with countless of other mass media-based organizations cant help but take digs at AI. take stephen a** smith. why the he** would he come on espn and say some sh** like “nba gms said he** no” to AI playing with their teams. I dont watch sportcenter but that segment was posted on youtube for the whole world to see. who does that? and of course, smith was specifically on that day to warn the public of AI`s grim financial state, as that was around the same time when news of AI`s wages being garnished leaked which subsequently led to false claims of AI being flat broke. does anyone else see a pattern here? espn and other networks know exactly what they are doing. “The media doesn`t tell people what to think but they do tell people what to think about.” and for more than 10 years, the media has been telling the public to think about Allen Iverson not as a person, not as a basketball player, not as a father, not as a charitable giver to communities but rather as a thug, a slacker who never practices and expected things to be handed to him, as a cancer who is the perfect scapegoat for any struggling organization, as a bad teammate, as an alcoholic, as an excessive gambler, as a financially incompetent individual who has never been able to live down his troubled past (i.e. the 30 for 30 film). unfortunately, this is how many people view Allen Iverson today. But this is not the real Allen Iverson and all you would have to do is talk to him for 5 minutes to realize this. Allen Iverson doesnt deserve this. No one deserves this. He is not perfect but he far from this fictional character that has aided in his continued absence from the nba. Allen Iverson should be playing in the nba and I truly hope to see him back on the nba court next season 2012-13. (came across this site about a week ago, click on the link)

  • djb

    I know what you mean @J. espn rarely even mentions Allen Iverson`s name without linking him to some cynical, legal, or satirical tale regarding an alleged addiction or a lawsuit or that played-out practice interview. I mean with all Iverson has done throughout his career and they choose to celebrate the anniversary of a single interview??? espn along with countless of other mass media-based organizations cant help but take digs at AI. take stephen a** smith. why the he** would he come on espn and say some sh** like “nba gms said he** no” to AI playing with their teams. I dont watch sportcenter but that segment was posted on youtube for the whole world to see. who does that? and of course, smith was specifically on that day to warn the public of AI`s grim financial state, as that was around the same time when news of AI`s wages being garnished leaked which subsequently led to false claims of AI being flat broke. does anyone else see a pattern here? espn and other networks know exactly what they are doing. “The media doesn`t tell people what to think but they do tell people what to think about.” and for more than 10 years, the media has been telling the public to think about Allen Iverson not as a person, not as a basketball player, not as a father, not as a charitable giver to communities but rather as a thug, a slacker who never practices and expected things to be handed to him, as a cancer who is the perfect scapegoat for any struggling organization, as a bad teammate, as an alcoholic, as an excessive gambler, as a financially incompetent individual who has never been able to live down his troubled past (i.e. the 30 for 30 film). unfortunately, this is how many people view Allen Iverson today. But this is not the real Allen Iverson and all you would have to do is talk to him for 5 minutes to realize this. Allen Iverson doesnt deserve this. No one deserves this. He is not perfect but he far from this fictional character that has aided in his continued absence from the nba. Allen Iverson should be playing in the nba and I truly hope to see him back on the nba court next season 2012-13. (came across this site about a week ago, http://bebe310.blogspot.com/2012/04/david-stern-and-espn-have-destroyed.html)

  • D-Funk

    i need tha TRU ones…

  • Kobester

    That shoe had to be retroed at least 3 or 4 times from AI’s 1st season.

  • jesse

    some of you guys need to chill with this pseudo conspiracy stuff man. if iverson could help a team that much he’d be playing in the league. point blank period.

  • http://none Black Man

    I’ve read about how Tiny Archibald had to adjust his game, then winning a chip with the Celts. Let’s hope that AI can come back, go through that adjustment, refocus, then do the same as well. I’d love for this to end as a good story.

    Good luck AI, and I will buy a pair of these shoes.

  • jay

    The most interesting personalities are the ones I always miss the most. Iverson, Shaq, Barkley, Rodman, Iceman, etc. The league needs more characters. I can’t stand these boring guys today. Even boring styles. Textbook fundamentals are great to watch (love watching Duncan), but I love different styles.
    .
    Iverson is the greatest athlete in NBA history and easily one of the most interesting/polarizing/exciting/etc.

  • jay

    Iverson could definitely help. He just burned his bridges. Even tho he’s fine with a bench role now teams won’t touch him. In a way maybe it’s best. My last memory of Iverson is him and Kobe going shot for shot in 2010. That was a great game. Vintage

  • anonymous

    AI is determined to get back on the court. hes kept himself in good physical condition and only needs some real bball action to work himself into game ready shape. Its disturbing that we are now 2 yrs removed from the AI playing in the nba and ppl are still using the same old excuses for why hes not playing. he be a great fit as a starter or reserve in multiple situations – a back court featuring AI and dwill would look for any team. we have teams struggling to reach double-figure wins in the reg seas, teams struggling to win games in the PO, teams struggling to break the 90-pt barrier in the reg and PO and a player in AI who is healthy/fit and capable of putting up real numbers.

  • anonymous

    You have a player in AI who hasnt been cited for “intentional injuring opposing players”. a player whose never thrown his teammates under the bus but has always maintained that win as a team lose as a team mentality. a player who always wants to play all 48 minutes not bc hes selfish but bc he loves being out there competing on the big stage. a player who will always put fans in the seats. a player that gives 110%. a player who should be playing in the nba in 2012-13.

  • jay

    ^^^ for all of the negative stuff with Iverson this guy has a point. Iverson never blamed his teammates in the media ever. And when he’d have a 50 pt game he’d always talk about his teammates instead. Every single time.

  • fruizm

    @anonymous….your second comment should appear in some type of commercial! perfect description of AI!

  • granville w. ghost, esq.

    Let me get this straight: You had Allen Iverson bringing up the trial, opening it up to questions, and you spent the rest of the interview asking him about shoes.

  • Russell

    Long live The Answer! Some NBA team HAS to giv him a shot next season. Is the league really that sorry that nobody will give the greatest little man of all time a shot at a chip? Really? Give A.I. his shot at a ring! He deserves it!

  • dreamsports70

    Great Interview of the Answer!! Allen Iverson is the face of the inner-city. He’s never tried to mask who he is to please others. This should be a lesson to others, regardless what the profession is. It’s much more admiral to go through life being yourself as opposed to trying to be what’s perceived as acceptable. It’s called being a man. In the long run, you’re respected more. Check out the new music video, “Resurrection 2.0″ on youtube.
    Answer!!!

  • http://slamonline.com Mars

    Yeah the lyeing on the re-release, we copped these as team shoes way back whn, but regardless AI is the nicest. Used-to put all them haters on skates. Rondo is a splitting image of this guy.

  • markymark

    Damn, just rocked the light blue Qs in a scrimmage last night – my fave pair of kicks EVER.

    That aside, this cat deserves a ring. Straight up legend. Screw St_rn for blackballing him.

  • Unknown

    Wish the best for Allen iverson,even I still keep his moto until today, ( play like this is your last game ) and keep bounce like a ball my man, and by the way the question 1 is the most comfort one to wear,once again,hope the best for you man!!

  • Cameron

    I missed his Questions but I bought the reebok answer Vii, Viii ix and x(pumps). Anyone else remember those Questions on Eastbay made with real diamonds that were being sold for over 15 g’s i think or more. Not sure, but they were pricey.

  • gakbrenti

    i wanna have the question somethin’ that i can’t buy back in 96. will reebok gonna make it again?plissssssssssssss

  • markymark

    @dreamsports70 – cheers to that bro.

  • Pingback: Allen Iverson Remembers His Connection With Philadelphia, And TGI Friday's « CBS Philly

  • Matt Gill

    I am 36 and have hated Reebok stuff for ever, in the UK the Classic range is just scum! I was always down with the Jordans up to 19ish? and now my hate turns JBs way for ripping people off with poor quality remakes of proper classics!
    That said, out of honour for AI, i bought a pair of 10th aniversary Questions (2007?)which sit snuggly in their paper and box in the vault. I think it is time they made a reappearance come Sunday!! Give him a break too, remember the guy he famously crossed up (twice!!!) played his last season over 40 years old!!!
    Peace

  • jay

    You really couldn’t see how hard this guy played until you saw him in person. This guy absorbed REAL hits — No flopping. He’d just get up shout some profanities and do it all over again. Amazing athlete.

  • Karen A

    I will agree that he was an outstanding basketball player, However, he was an egotistical, self-centered, arrogant jackass ! Did any of you ever see how he treated people ? I did and he is an ignorant son of a B***H ! When there was a little 8 year old girl decked out head to toe in HIS merchandise, he had a BODYGUARD push her away because he was at the bar at Houlihan’s playing a game ?? He was so special that he could park his car in a NO PARKING ZONE ? FIRE ZONE ? The Philadelphia Police Department should be ashamed of themselves as well for NOT ticketing any of his cars that were parked illegally. He needs to grow up and act like a man instead of a damn SPOLIED BRAT !

  • phillyS finest

    the greatest little man the league has ever seen. not 2nd, or 3rd.. ignorants.. #1 hands down.

  • alex schroeder

    awww this is so sweet, ive been searching for iversons shoes i cud buy in my size and cant find em no where. thats what i was doing when i searched allen iverson shoes and i got this, i am so exited, i am def gettin a pair. they shud come out with diffrent colors so i cud wear em for my high school team next season

  • alex schroeder

    ive had all his shoes except answer 1 and 2 and im 17,hes the reason i started playing basketball,he made the inspiration to play the game so great

  • Nicole

    I remeber when these shoes first came out. I was 18 years old. I wasnt a tennis shoe wearing girl, but i had to have these just because they were Allen Iverson shoe. I had the blue and white ones and i knew i would never meet him, but buying his shoe was the closest i could get to him i would. I supported him then and 17 years later still not a tennis shoe woman, but i will support him now. He’s my favorite basketball player ever. His heart is enough to hold a team if nothing else. You just have to love his drive and be able to Question nothing as long as he is the Answer.

  • DogCasey

    Tiger Woods is the new A Iverson. They have written him off since 11/09 car accident and will not give up till he is gone. MEDIA sucks, all making money off of him.

    Bless a.i. Loved him forever. Great to see he’s still in shape. Play NBA and show them who the real winnah is A.I., pls.

    GO Tiger. Keep up with the earlplugs on.

  • Guest

    the Iverson shoes pictured, the crossovers will be re-released this week on karmaloop.com

    Get 21% off your entire order at karmaloop and plndr w/ rep code: APATHY. no exp date

  • Jay

    the Iverson shoes pictured, the Questions, one of the best pairs of sneaks ever will be re-released this week on karmaloop.com
    Get 21% off your entire order at karmaloop and plndr w/ rep code: APATHY. no exp date

  • Tanveer

    Millions of people are waiting for iverson to come back to the NBA. It is a shame the NBA are bias against certain stars wanting to come back.

  • http://www.facebook.com/priya.lodhi900 Pawan Kumar
  • Donna_Jenkins

    I usually don’t post on articles like this, but I felt compelled to do so here. I know this is from a couple of years ago but I’m just now seeing this article. When exactly did AI do these things that you speak of? I’m willing to bet it was when he was very young (yes, I have heard about those things). It is well known that he had a volatile, angry attitude with a chip on his shoulder when he was young, which although there is no excuse for, makes a lot of sense given how tumultuous, unstable, and anguished his childhood and adolescent years were and how many people turned their backs on him and let him down. However, as AI got older, he changed a lot. I have several friends who have met Allen Iverson (within the past 5 years) and said he was really cool and down to earth once you get past his walls. He is said to be an introverted person by nature and I think that comes across to people as mean, but one of my friends met Iverson at a club where AI was sitting alone and my friend (who was a big fan growing up) walked up to him and started talking to him. My friend said AI was standoffish at first, but then after several minutes when AI felt more comfortable around my friend, he began to open up and they had a 30 minute conversation. Another friend met AI at a charity event and said he was super nice though very guarded. I also remember talking to someone who saw AI happily sign loads of autographs for children after a game against the Indiana Pacers back in 2005 where the 76ers lost. This friend said the way AI interacted with these kids was “adorable.” Additionally, AI was a complete class act in the 2004 Olympic Games and then afterwards remained a model citizen in Philly and in Denver. Unfortunately the rumors piled up when he was in Detroit and he suffered from depression and downward spiraled (and quite frankly, I do not know one person who is nice when they are depressed). But AI is human and we all have our flaws. He has done a lot for the community as he has gotten older: anti-violence clinics for kids in his hometown, taking in hurricane Katrina victims and giving them shelter, food, and clothing; he has donated a lot of money for youth scholarships, he runs mentoring and basketball camps in numerous cities – including his hometown, he has donated a significant amount of money to anti-violence programs, he has run events to benefit the police department, and he paid for a gunshot victim’s funeral after seeing it on the news, and I can go on and on with good things he has done that never get media attention. So there are two sides to every story. Yes, AI has done a lot of bad things in his life, but he has also done a lot of good things, has matured a lot, and seems very genuine in interviews – sensitive and emotional. He has also been through a lot of hardship in his life that a lot of people cannot fathom: childhood abuse, neglect, extreme poverty, violence (losing over 10 loved ones to gun violence in his childhood and adolescent years – having witnessed some of their deaths … and losing his best friend in adulthood to gun violence), incarceration as a minor for several months in adult prison, having a mom and family members on drugs, extremely sick- epileptic litter sister who he had to miss school to take care of because his mother wasn’t around, etc. while still having to experience the pressure of cruel basketball fans and the media from the tender age of 16 since he was a star athlete and All-American. The media mistreated him from day 1 – before he even went to prison, and there are fans who have been incredibly cruel to him (fans have spat at him – in college and the NBA … have called him racial slurs… have told him he belongs in prison…). So people have let Iverson down and he had difficulty emotionally adjusting. I mean, even when AI was in the NBA, he was once shot at in Philadelphia. It is difficult to go through those things and not be affected. Is it not fair to say that our life experiences deeply affect our psychological well-being? Nobody is perfect. If somebody has been mistreated by a lot of people, does it not make sense that he/she will be very guarded, seem anti-social, keep to themselves, and at times act defiant or unruly? I’m just giving food for thought. I’m not saying AI wasn’t wrong. He has done bad things, which he acknowledges and seems to genuinely feel bad for. I’m saying that there is a lot of good in him too that a lot of people look past, and from a psychological standpoint, his poor decisions during parts of his life make sense. People need to look at themselves in the mirror and focus on their own problems before they pass judgement on someone else. You never know what someone is going through when they act the way they do. And that goes for everyone – not just celebrities. My two cents.

  • Donna_Jenkins

    PS- I have parked in a No Parking Zone before b/c there was no parking anywhere else and I had to run quickly to the post office. In fact, I have illegally parked my fair share of times – and have paid a lot of tickets. I’m certainly not a celebrity so nobody hears about it. I know many people who have parked in handicap spots before and none of them are celebrities. Those things are certainly wrong, but are you really going to sit here and say someone is a bad person who treats people badly because they do stupid stuff like that when they’re young? I guarantee you, you have done things just as bad in your life at some point. Most people have violated parking and traffic laws at some point in their lives. Some people have terrible road rage, and others are just reckless when it comes to vehicles. Some people get DUIs. My career is dedicated to helping troubled teens and children with disabilities, and I can tell you right now – I am not a selfish, spoiled brat because of parking violations I had 5-10 years ago (nor was I a spoiled brat then. I was just an idiot). The only reason people care that Iverson has done that sort of thing is because he was a celebrity. Many regular citizens do crap like this all the time so I highly doubt it’s an “entitlement because I’m a celeb” sort of thing.

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