Quantcast
Friday, May 3rd, 2013 at 11:20 am  |  74 responses

Reggie Miller Swears Prior to Warriors’ Team Prayer in Locker Room (VIDEO)

Following the Golden State Warriors’ emotional 92-88 Game 6 victory, TNT analyst Reggie Miller inexplicably showed up in their locker room and dropped an “S” bomb while discussing the game’s ugly final 8 minutes. The Dubs then said a prayer. Weird night.

  • Add a Comment
  • Share
  • RSS

Tags: , , , ,

  • initbruv

    Mark Jackson: “Cool, now stop touching me.”

  • Max

    Must be weird playing on that team if you don’t believe in god..

  • Ben Ireland

    Mark knocked him out for putting his hand on his shoulder. Hand down, man down.

  • Jay Cutler

    Ah. The playoffs. When God starts choosing his favorite teams and deciding who wins and who loses

  • Kadavour

    great comment

  • Max

    LOOL
    He hated Lebron so bad in the ’11 finals that he took his powers.

  • Name

    LOL exactly what I was thinking. Mark Jackson is always thanking God as if Satan was on the other team’s side

  • LakeShow

    Right?
    I went to a private school, so i’m use to this, but today, i’m not the boy I was and I would want to make it clear that “God” is a term for a greater power that may or may not be watching over us. Not the Judaic Christ, or Islamic Allah, or Ra, or some sh*t, but when you make millions doing what you love, it probably makes it feel as if ‘God’ is watching after you and is with you and for some reason…. wants your team to win more than the others lol….

  • LakeShow

    “Hand on, hand off!”

  • http://twitter.com/trueballer4lif1 Melvin flynt

    Count your blessings

  • http://www.facebook.com/tuotila1 Tuomas Uotila

    I always find it fun how people assume that – should there be one – a higher power would give a flying f**k about a basketball game’s outcome. This approach doesn’t seem humble at all, quite the opposite.

    (Or that it would give a f**k about people “fornicating”, for that matter. But that’s another story.)

  • http://twitter.com/trueballer4lif1 Melvin flynt

    God giveith god take it away..

  • initbruv

    lol, yeah like God is stopping his other business to influence basketball games: “Now I’ll make the refs call a blocking foul on McGee because that guy Mark shows me mad love.”

  • initbruv

    Yeah you know there’s at least a couple of them who just sigh to themselves every time it’s prayer time.

  • Max

    I’d be all like dafuq is going on in here mang..

  • Max

    Hahaha

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000166716900 Anthony Darnello Taylor Jr.

    See right now yall are bashing religion, which is so uncool with the exception of LakeShow because he is speaking from more of an intrinsic point of view. but the rest of yall are beinga tad petty albeit it is your right to speak freely about whatever you want. Now if I so choose to start bashing homo’s because it lines up more easily to where my faith lies I’m going to be labled as an asshole.
    I can’t see how dudes wana take it up the chili ring, or how women wana play rubber and bump coin purses, but that is on them. It is their choice, and theirs alone. I could be mocking people who don’t accept or understand what I believe in by saying they are naive, bitter, or just plain inept at grasping the concept of an all knowin, all present, all power deity, that is just as merciful as he wrathful when provoked(maybe given that all of us believer or not equally piss him off.)
    He offers forgiveness to everybody regardless of who you are or what you have done,even those who have no intenion of seeking it. I myself am a very heavily flawed person and I know God loves me just as much as he loves everyone else believer or not. I know we believers don’t offer the best examples of God is all about and I apologize for my part in that. And I understand that all this most likely won’t matter to you guys and that is fine, I’m neither mad nor spiteful. I wish you all nothing but success in this life nd after it regardless of what you do, what you believe, or where you go.
    All I ask is the tolerance you request for your beliefs be returned for mine, I love this site, I love basketball, and furthermore I enjoy sharing this interest with you gentlemen and engaging in good healthy debate and I want to continue doing so. But this criticism of orientation and religion needs to stop both sides have been mistreating each other and I for one am embarresd(spell check) this site is full of very brilliant people and we all are more than capable of doing this.

  • initbruv

    Where is religion being bashed? Just some lighthearted joking. Relax.

  • spit hot fiyah

    only people with anthropomorphic understandings of God would think something like that

  • spit hot fiyah

    exactly some lighthearted jokes. and if those same light hearted jokes are aimed at jason collins then half of the commenters get all butt hurt. i think was just asking for some respect for what some people consider sacred.

  • initbruv

    Yes, that’s the point.

  • initbruv

    I agree with that. I didn’t have a problem with people making jokes about Jason Collins. I had a problem with people like that one dude saying “people here pretending to be cool with fagotry…smh.” Nothing lighthearted about that.

  • LP @ThisisEther

    Shaq reincarnated!!!!!!

  • spit hot fiyah

    what point are you trying to make?

  • initbruv

    That it is silly to think God has any effects on, or concern with sports…i.e. attributing anthropomorphic (to say the least) qualities to a being that allegedly created and controls the entire universe.

  • spit hot fiyah

    to say that God controls his creation has nothing to do with anthropomorphism, it is connected to power and will. to say that he would be occupied with something and has to stop other business is anthropomorphic.

  • sp

    maybe to the one who said it it was a lighthearted joke, while to others it was bashing. different perspective. respect all around will take us a long way

  • initbruv

    Jesus. And here I thought I was just making a simple observation. What are you so opposed to in regards to my original comment? Where are we going with this?

  • initbruv

    I do have respect for religious people. My entire family is religious (I even have an uncle who’s a minister). I also have a sense of humor.

  • spit hot fiyah

    if someone uttered what u wrote in your original comment, it would be someone with an anthropomorphic understanding of God, like i pointed out. that’s all wanted to say about your comment. where we are going with this? it doesn’t seem like very far, since based on your last comment, you might not understand what i said in my comment before this one..

  • spit hot fiyah

    good, i also have a sense of humor, even though some might disagree with that based on all the terrible jokes i make in this website.

  • initbruv

    That’s right. You are vastly more intelligent than me and I did not understand your comment…sigh. Good day to you sir.

  • Iggi Vasquez

    Funny…..

  • spit hot fiyah

    thanks man, same to you

  • Iggi Vasquez

    Religion divide people, religion means division. Religion is destroying the world….. If you can’t see that then you must be blind or maybe just a religious person….

  • jaycee

    dude, GREED and un-natural living is destroying the world. Get your facts straight.

  • jaycee

    I don’t think it’s as much about ‘God picking sides’ as it has to do with ‘energy focus’. If any of you have ever been a prayer OR meditation group, or done yoga in a class, energy is multiplied. There is definitely a force out there, which our ancestors all the way up until this day know can be harnessed through different methods – prayer being a powerful one.

    Nothing wrong with giving thanks either. Most likely, the warriors pray after they take an L too!

  • John

    Where does Draymond Green make any reference to the outcome of their game(s)? He asks for God to “watch over them” and “help them bond.” Nowhere does he ask/thank God for victories on the court.

  • jaycee

    and is that Bob Marley in your avi? Dude was straight prophet, religion to the fullest.. quoted the bible in basically every single one of his songs..

  • http://www.facebook.com/bcbrookins Brittany Brookins

    Right I mean I make some bold jokes buti save them for my private life not public forums.

  • Bandwagonfan

    I see.now can younexplain why only black is allowed to be genetically more athletic? I tried so hard to be an nba player. Just kidding, i play warcraft 3

  • http://twitter.com/Jzakoni Sanchez

    it aint abut the outcome you idiot

  • http://twitter.com/Jzakoni Sanchez

    shut up

  • http://twitter.com/Jzakoni Sanchez

    get off da tip mang

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    He is telling you that if you really understood the concept of omnipresent, omnipotent you would understand that he doesn’t need to “stop” doing one thing to do another.
    Also, while I agree that thinking God influences a game is silly, thanking him for success if not.

  • Noompsi

    Whatever. But when you lose, why don’t you publicly BLAME god? Seriously, man up with that sh*t. Win/thank/lose/blame. Makes sense to me!

  • initbruv

    Why don’t you do it you c*nt?

  • initbruv

    What is wrong with you two? You guys are so hung up on
    thinking that I would think God would have a little control tower where he could only do one thing at a time. I just wanted to slip in a joke about that horrible call. And yes it is silly and arrogant to thank him for your success. Yeah, you’re in the NBA and then
    some other person who is actually a better human being is starving to death. Why? “Because God works in mysterious ways”…right? No, because you are not any
    more important in this universe than a horse or a tree or a squirrel is. If there is “God”, it’s pretty clear that all of this stuff he created isn’t about you. The universe was here long before us and will be here long after. You are in control of your own life so be thankful to luck, other people, and yourself
    when things go well. Because when sh*t starts going bad God won’t be there to save you.

  • initbruv

    The last part of Mark Twain’s “Mysterious Stranger” sums up the absurdity of the idea of the Christian God, in general: “a God who could make good children as easily as bad, yet preferred to make bad ones; who could have made everyone of them happy, yet never made a single happy one; who made them prize their bitter life, yet stingily cut it short; who gave his angels eternal happiness unearned, yet required his other children to earn it; who gave angels painless lives, yet cursed his other children with biting miseries and maladies of mind and body; who mouths justice and invented hell-mouths mercy and invented hell-mouths Golden Rules, and forgiveness multiplied by seventy times seven, and invented hell; who mouths morals to other people and has none himself; who frowns upon crimes, yet commits them all; who created man without invitation, then tries to shuffle responsibility for man’s acts upon man, instead of honorably placing it where it belongs, upon himself; and finally, with altogether divine obtuseness, invites this poor, abused slave to worship him!”

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    Again, if that’s what Mark Twain got from the Bible, then that’s Mark Twain’s choice.
    People complain about the freedom to make poor choices, yet whine if anyone impinges upon their free will. We expect God to make everyone happy, but would we appreciate forced happiness without the concept of sadness? Can we appreciate sweet without bland or sour?
    We appreciate the concept of discipline and consequences in our daily lives, but bristle at the idea of an eternal consequence.
    Moreover, Twain’s Biblical knowledge is lacking if he thinks angels have eternal happiness unearned. Y’all should really, really read the book a little closer before you start speaking on it.

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    Well, my God has consistently been there save me. When I consider my life, and consider the lives of so many others who have suffered in amazing ways, I thank God for his mercy in my life.
    The Bible clearly states, the sun shines on the just and the unjust, and the rain falls on the good and the evil.
    It’s as if people didn’t bother to read the book and then make sweeping judgements about what it says and doesn’t say. Read Ecclesiastes, check out Lamentations. Read the book of Job. All these books discuss suffering, the apparent futility of life as a human, and then they come back to God as the single redeeming point. The very criticisms you’ve levied at the Bible have been addressed and discussed IN THE BIBLE! What is shocking to me is that people don’t even bother to read the book. My middle school teacher, an atheist or agnostic if I ever saw one, said that anyone who hasn’t taken the time to read and study the Bible can’t consider themselves informed because the book impacts so many aspects of human life. Our governments, our morality, our concepts of life and death all have links to the Bible.

  • initbruv

    It is true that I have an embarrassing lack of knowledge of the Bible, especially considering the fact that I went to church regularly when I was younger. But for me, rejecting Christianity has nothing to do with the Bible, it’s the inherent nature of religion. As I said, I find it hard to believe that we are as important as we seem to think we are, therefore I don’t think that we have some link to God that other animals do not have. I do not think that we go to heaven while other animals are just soulless objects for us to use. Most importantly, I do not think that that our purpose and the afterlife is knowable for anyone, therefore I reject anyone who claims to have the word of God. Every civilization has had their Gods, and now we look at all the past religions and think they look silly. But to me, they are all silly. All religions are equal to me in that they are not bad or good, they’re just not for me. The experience that you have with your religion is something foreign to me. But such is life.

  • initbruv

    Maybe so. But you don’t need to read the Bible to decide that religion is inherently foolish.

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    That’s fine, and that’s your choice. But, I like I said, just to understand the basic allusions in many movies and literature, it’s good to have a knowledge of the Bible, even without a belief.
    Religion has its flaws, but it also has amazing strengths. Nearly every successful social movement in American history was driven by people of faith. Throughout the history of mankind, religion, particularly Christianity, Islam and Judaism, have created both enormous harm and enormous good in the world.

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    Why is it so hard to believe that God would care about fornication? Maybe you should reconsider what sex really is.

  • initbruv

    I’m not saying that I don’t have a basic understanding of the Bible. And there are certain passages and stories that I find very beautiful. The Sermon on the Mount, for example, is enough to make me admire Christianity and the Bible in general. My uncle is a Methodist minister and we once had a long talk about how the people at the time would use stories and so forth to get a moral or a point across and gave me a bunch of examples. It made me realize that the Bible is an incredible book on it’s own. Even if it didn’t have such a large following it would still be worth reading just for the sake of the quality of the writing.

    And of course anyone who wants to praise or denounce religion would have plenty of historical facts to back up their point. The reason this is true is that religion is made up of people, and people are a mixture of bad and good. That’s why I don’t denounce religion or religious people as a whole any more than I support atheists. I tend to think that if someone is an a**hole, they will use their religion in an a**hole-ish sort of way. If they are a good person they will use it in an admirable way. Many people tell me that it’s brought them solace in trying times. Who am I to say that’s not legitimate? I also like the community aspect of church and wish it could be duplicated outside of religion.

    I live in SLC where Mormons dominate. I used to despise Mormons and make fun of them (as young non-Mormons do here to be “rebellious”). But when my dad was in the hospital with cancer my Mormon neighbors organized an effort to bring my sister and I dinner while my mom was up at the hospital. We weren’t fellow church members but we were their neighbors and that was enough for them. I’ll never forget that and never denounce religious people simply for the fact that they are religious.

    Anyways sorry to ramble. I just think that it’s important to distinguish between the fact that I find no personal connection with religion and am often baffled that anyone does, and the fact that I do not think that religion is harmful or any of that other nonsense that is promoted by too many atheists these days.

  • Iggi Vasquez

    Greed is a big part of religion. Why you think the church funded Christopher Columbus trips? It was all about greed..Kill all native and take the gold…

  • http://www.facebook.com/tuotila1 Tuomas Uotila

    Weeeell… because I see absolutely no reason to think that a higher entity would? Occam’s razor is a beautiful thing. At most, I believe in a form of Pantheism. And that marriage should be purely a judicial arrangement.

    If people get strength from faith, fine. Still, I’m a bit annoyed by the fact that Jackson might be force-feeding religion on someone. As for fornication, it popped into mind because I still remember this: “‘In fairness to me, as a pastor, I’m going to be linked to drug dealers, drug addicts, liars and fornicators,’ Jackson said. ‘The church is a place for sick people to be healed.”

    Putting people who’ve had premarital sex in the same sentence with drug dealers and people with actual issues is simply idiotic, I’m afraid. Adding the word “sick” is just a nice finishing touch.

    http://www.slamonline.com/online/nba/2011/09/mark-jackson-explains-relationship-with-major-drug-dealer/

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    That’s an actual biblical reference. Jesus told the Pharisees, when they criticized him for fraternizing with fornicators, tax collectors and other assorted sinners, that a doctor should go to the people who are sick. The church’s focus should be on helping people overcome sin, not condemning them or running away from them because they are sinners.
    And the Bible bestows equality upon sin, since all sin stems from a disobedience to God’s standards. So, he lumped them in together because in non-Catholic Christian doctrine there are no big sins and little sins. There are sins. If you are a chronic fornicator that is not different from being a chronic heroin abuser or dealer. Each problem is a sin you need to be delivered from.
    As for sin, the Bible outlines the purpose of sex, why God set it aside for the marriage relationship, and the consequences of sex outside of that bond. You should check it out before you decide it doesn’t make sense.

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    I think that is a good distinction to make, and I appreciate your clarification. However, that quote you used from Mark Twain takes a decidedly different stance.

  • initbruv

    No it does not. I said that I respect the excellent writing and story telling in the Bible. And I respect the community aspect and the focus on caring for the poor (i.e. the Beatitudes). I did not say that I do not still find the concept of God, and especially heaven and hell, absurd.

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    It takes an incredible mental leap to find the concept of God absurd, and appreciate the beauty of the Bible. The entire book is based around the concept of God. I mean, the Sermon on the Mount is talking almost entirely about heaven and the idea of eternal rewards from God.

  • initbruv

    No it does not take a leap. I don’t appreciate it to the same extent that you do obviously, and I don’t know it as well as you do either, obviously. But when one says “blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth…blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God”, which obviously is tied directly to God and salvation, I think that they will come to the same conclusions about how to live their life and how to treat others as I will. We get there through different belief systems and conceptions of the world, but if we end up at the same place then it doesn’t matter.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tuotila1 Tuomas Uotila

    So instead of Mark Jackson, I should just blame The Bible. Luckily, some 2000 years later in today’s world, we have people who actually warrant being called doctors. Of course I’m aware of the principle but didn’t even remember it being THAT far off. I used to be Lutheran so I had enough people trying to put this nonsense in my head.

    A point where secularism has gone too far simply doesn’t exist.

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    Well, there actually were doctors in those times as well. Like Luke.
    I was correcting your decision to take his comment about sickness in its most literal sense, which was of course incorrect given the biblical allusion he was making. Whether you choose to believe is up to you, but I’m of the opinion that if you’re going to argue you a point you should be intimately aware of the opposition’s positions.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tuotila1 Tuomas Uotila

    Fair enough, thanks for clearing that up.

    I’m quite aware that Luke was a “doctor”. However, there was nothing even remotely resembling the modern practice of medicine at the time, which of course is what I meant.

    Nope, still nothing wrong with sex outside of marriage, be it Christian or whatever. It’s quite beautiful done safely and responsibly. I would need a reason to assume that to think otherwise is derived from some God and isn’t just religious people clinging on to an outdated dogma.

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    Nah, divorcees are included. Evolution is often just a euphemism for rationalization.

    And no one is born with a sense of right and wrong. We are socialized into understanding what is right and wrong, which is why there are different concepts in different societies. Religion is one of the main socializing methods and always has been.

    Again, the very fact that you have to worry about “safe sex” is a sign of a problem. Sex within a marriage is always safe if the two parties do not violate the vows of their marriage. There is no such thing as “safe sex” outside of marriage. There is “less risky” sex, but not safe sex.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tuotila1 Tuomas Uotila

    So now divorce really is a sin as well? Nnnnnice.

    Premarital sex may be a problem, may be a sign of becoming a problem, may not be a problem at all. Is not a problem per se. Where did you get that I have to worry about safe sex (happily engaged at the moment, in fact)? You don’t have to assume, just read. The fact that you think you know something about the life of a person living on a different continent based on a couple comments really could be a sign of a problem.

    Also, the huge straw man in your second paragraph says hi.

    By the way, I took the liberty of revisiting the scripture on the subject (had the flu and had nothing better to do). This is a caricature, but all the various justifications seemed to be of the following variety: 1) Poor or very poor causality, and 2) Circular reasoning. All dressed in the fine cloth of violent bigotry, of course. Not exactly a ringing endorsement.

    I do like parts of the bible. The Song of Songs is a fine piece of LITERATURE.

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    Which scripture did you revisit?
    And there is no strawman in my second paragraph. You wrote: ” And if one truly needs religion to give him/her a sense of right and wrong, there’s trouble to begin with.”

    I pointed out that’s ridiculous. Your statement implies that people are born with a sense of morality. Or, your statement implies that religion is just an unacceptable way to gain a sense of right and wrong because it’s religion.

    My comment was noting that right and wrong, the concept of those two ideas, is a byproduct of socialization. We are not born with morality. Religion is one way humans have developed morality. More importantly, you would be hard pressed to fine a single value humans currently see as “moral” that does not have an religious underpinning.

    Point me to the strawman.

    And I’m not trafficking in assumptions. You wrote: “It’s quite beautiful done safely and responsibly.”

    Sex done safely is called “safe sex.” I addressed the idea of safe sex because you brought it up, not because I made any assumptions.

  • initbruv

    Peoples’ sense of what is right and wrong changes outside of religion. Hence, why Christian people behaved one way in a particular time period and a different way today.

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    I never said it didn’t. I said there is nothing wrong with believing that people need religion to give them a sense of right and wrong. That is one of it’s primary focuses, and it’s been used that way in innumerable societies across the expanse of time.
    It’s a socializing agent. Just like schools or clubs. However, as a believer, I think it has a higher purpose and more moral authority.

  • initbruv

    Oh ok.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tuotila1 Tuomas Uotila

    So let me get this straight: you’re asking me to list parts of scripture you didn’t in order to, you know, prove your own point about fornication being wrong? Ever heard of the burden of proof? He asked in purely rhetorical fashion.

    I get it now: by saying “Again, the very fact that you have to worry about ‘safe sex’ is a sign of a problem”, instead of “you”, you actually meant “people”. This is probably my mistake. Somehow. Has to be.

    As for the straw man – let me clarify. All this time I’ve been talking about things related to the year 2013, not the year 0. So when I wrote: “And if one truly needs religion to give him/her a sense of right and wrong, there’s trouble to begin with” I meant it in relation to today’s so-called western society, and all the fruits for socialization that’s come in centuries past. You know, a society where there’s modern medicine (we’ve been here before), social theory and such, and it’s slowly becoming OK to laugh at folks who impose morality on others just because. If one has all this background to fall on and still needs the present organized religion to tell him/her what’s cool or not, we have a problem. Prisons are overcrowded with these kind of people. I never implied that anyone is born with a sense of right and wrong, hence the straw man.

    Thank you, for now. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve enjoyed the convo. Been following the site for years and now the commenting system actually works. Detroit fan, by the way. Might explain the slight grumpiness.

  • http://twitter.com/apowellAdvocate Allen Powell II

    i asked for the scripture because the Bible discusses fornication on multiple occasions. So, by saying you revisted the “scripture” you actually could have been talking about dozens of passages within the text. The word “fornication” was often a catchall term for sexual immorality in general, and therefore the surrounding context is crucial.

    Acknowledging that the Bible is the underpinning for the modern idea of right and wrong in many instances, but then saying you don’t need the Bible or religion in modern times is a bit problematic, don’t you think? After all, if it’s the source material for many of the value systems currently promulgated, wouldn’t it make sense to go to the source material to get your values?

    No one “imposes” morality on anyone. Each individual person decides what moral system they will adhere to. Groups of people within a representative government band together to decide which of those values will then be used for the society as a whole. It is silly to consider it an imposition when someone has a different value system from you, and disagrees openly with your value system. How it is it an imposition when someone has their own values and doesn’t hesitate to express those values? Don’t you expect the freedom to do the same.

    As for my use of “you.” I thought it was obvious that I was using “you” as a stand-in for the entirety of mankind when discussing safe sex. Clearly you thought I was referencing you specifically and commenting on the type of sex you have or don’t have. No, my point was that sex within a committed marriage eliminates the risks associated with sex outside of marriage. Everyone understand this fact. Statistics also show that marriages often have far fewer unwanted pregnancies as well.

    My argument boils down very easily. The Bible offers explicit and implied explanations for why sex should be confined to the marriage bed. It seems strange that you’ve never pondered the reasoning behind the prohibition, but have decided it can’t possibly be justified. I’ve pondered whether or not it is justified on many instances, and investigated it.

Advertisement