Quantcast
Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013 at 11:00 am  |  53 responses

Chris Paul Says He Might Retire ‘a Little Early’ (VIDEO)

During an “HBO Real Sports” profile set to air tonight, LA Clippers superstar point guard Chris Paul hints that family obligations might force him to retire from the NBA a little earlier than what most anticipate. (CP3 signed a five-year, $107 million contract extension with the Clippers this summer.) Per SI: “I love to play basketball more than anybody,’ Paul said. ‘I’m serious, nobody loves to play basketball more than I do. But I could honestly see myself maybe stopping a little early or premature just because I hate to miss anything with my kids. I would hate for my kids to recall those special moments in their life, and I wasn’t there.’”

  • Add a Comment
  • Share
  • RSS

Tags: , ,

  • Smits#45

    I doubt his kids would want him to miss a championship due to early retirement. I wouldn’t if he would’ve been my father.

  • Zabbah

    Sounds like a good idea to him but he’s gonna get bored of his family and come out of his retirement, especially if he retired a little early.

  • experienced

    I could never get ‘bored’ of my family. There isn’t a milestone I’d rather miss to play what is ultimately just a game. You don’t get those moments back. Children are children for a very short period of time. He’s already rich, and a championship doesn’t make or break who a human being is. To me, it’s sad if the greatest thing a man ever does in life is play a sport well. Coming from a father CP just went up a notch or five in my book.

  • Zabbah

    You’re an idiot.

  • Dfrance

    I wouldn’t go as far to say that he would get bored with his family, but he will get bored. While you want to share in your kids moments, they have lives of their own. He’s gonna find himself with a ton of free time, and thats when he’ll start missing the game.

    He’ll miss it even more knowing he can still go out there and play.

  • Busta213

    Dude, while they do go on a lot of road trips, its not like they are stationed overseas like theyre on a military tour!
    They have an off-season from Jun-Sep – and that can be longer if your team is bad. plenty of time for good parenting

  • Anthony

    Haven’t you guys seen what’s been said on some of the HOF inductions….Rodman’s one regret, wishes he was a better father, look at Jordan, his daughter is openly homosexual. I’m not personally saying anything is wrong with that, but Jordan being from an NC, christian up bringing, I’m sure that was a pill to swallow. Other sport greats, look at their documentaries, Lawrence Taylor to Mike Tyson….they all put missing time with their kids as a #1 regret. All this to say…I believe CP3 in what he said and doubt he’d have regrets if he did step away earlier than he’d like to.

  • Zabbah

    well said.

  • robb

    MJ’s absence has nothing to do with her daughter being homosexual. Psychologically speaking, an absent mother could arguably be an influence on that, but ultimately people’s sexuality is a personal thing. I don’t understand your point really.

  • Above_You

    And you’re too young and stupid to even be a part of this discussion.

  • Above_You

    Which has exactly what to do with choosing to miss out on your kid’s childhood’s? Boredom from a professional standpoint will happen to anyone who retires regardless of age. The issue with pro athlete’ is that they spend an abnormal amount of time away from their children in the most crucial part of their childhoods. You don’t raise adult children as a 65 year old retiree. Raising children is a bit more than simply “sharing in their moments”. They have lives of their own when they are old enough to have them. Until they are legal, you have a duty as a parent to be there when you can. If retiring early is the way to do it, and CP can afford to, then he’s making the right choice. In the world of half- decent parents, this isn’t debatable. Money doesn’t raise children, parents do.

  • Above_You

    Children don’t need to be raised only at a parent’s convenience. Forgive me if I find it hilarious that you think summer months are enough time to spend with your kids. Basketball isn’t life. I know you’re a fan and all, but get out into the real world a bit. It’s a just a game.

  • Above_You

    Well said. Idk if these fools are just too young and immature, or to used to growing up without fathers, but I dig where you’re coming from. You only get to raise your kids once. You have to be a complete fucking moron to think a championship is more important than being there for your kids. If you think that, don’t procreate.

  • B!

    LMAO at June – September being plenty of time for good parenting. Plenty of time for good summer memories maybe, but parenting is a 24 hour a day job.

    The numbskullallry is real with this one.

  • dcthemvp

    You really are stupid, aren’t ya?

  • Busta213

    Lol, I obviously don’t think that you can just show up to raise your kids in the summer and be a good parent.

    Where are these NBA players the rest of the year? Live in the same city as your family, and where are you staying for home games? With your family.

    What hours are you working while you are on a home-stand? A few hours of gym/training a day plus a few hours in the evening for the game.

    During that part you can spend more time at home with the family than most working parents (but bare in mind most people earning their salary levels will be busy execs)

    I don’t dispute that road trips can come at inconvenient times but they usually 3 nights – not months on end.

  • Busta213

    Lol, I only wrote three sentences, yet you only read the last two?
    Are you stupid enough to think they cant see their kids AT ALL during the season?
    Really?
    *rolls eyes*

  • Busta213

    But still smarter than you. I responded in full to one of the grown-ups.

  • dcthemvp

    Aren’t you a big boy

  • Dfrance

    Show me where in my post I said he shouldn’t retire early if he felt the need to. All I was referring to is the itch to return. The point I was making, is that when you retire from anything, especially at an early age, you find yourself with a ton of free time. Athletes especially get that itch to come back when they know they still can compete at a high level.

    Why do you think so many sports guys retire to “spend more time with their families” only to return to the game the next chance they get? It’s not because they’re bad fathers, its the passion that they have for the game.

  • Dfrance

    Nah, by these dudes logic, one should retire the minute they have a child because the special moments start happening as soon as they leave the womb.

    CP3 of all people is a great example of a professional athlete dad making it work as you see how much his son is with him on road trips, press conferences, in the locker room etc.

  • Zabbah

    Exactly, I was speaking from experience. Not mine, but other pro athletes who retired early to spend time with their family.

  • B!

    The funny thing is, you ASSumed that I only read the last two. It’s your last sentence that makes absolutely no sense. The summer shouldn’t be the only time to be a good parenting. Seeing your kids doesn’t make you a good parent. There’s way more to it than that. That’s what I was saying. I guess I should’ve dumbed it down for you.

  • Busta213

    If you really read the entire statement, why are you only associating the last two sentences with my viewpoint?

    Even after I clarify that your statement does not correctly encompass what I was suggesting, you (like the muppet you are), respond “The summer shouldn’t be the only time to be a good parenting”.

    Duh! I never said it was (yet you have the nerve to talk about “dumbing things down”?!).

    In my response to “Above you”, I broke it down further.

    Im sure you will respond again with more:

    “Lolz, omg the summer shouldn’t be the only time to be a good parenting!!!1!!”

  • Ei_Ehm

    3 months in the summer and some time during the season sounds good enough. Beats sitting home doing nothing with a load of cash and some brats and a nagging wife. A fine example daddy would set to his children.

  • Ei_Ehm

    Why did you put bored between quotations? It sounds like you have daddy issues.

  • Above_You

    You didn’t need to. Your post pertained to boredom after retirement, which is not exclusive to athletes. If anything you highlighted the stupidity of most athletes who fail to plan for professional lives outside of the sport, since they retire younger than most employees. You can’t just skip out on parenting because you don’t know how to do anything besides play a game. Intentions aside, the bottom line is that you can’t be a great father if you aren’t there. Passion for a game shouldn’t exceed your passion for being there for your children, especially when you have aren’t financially obligated to be away. You and the rest of these fools idolize athletes to the point that you rationalize absentee parenting. I find that pathetic.

  • Above_You

    Indeed, that was the dumbest post on the whole thread.

  • Above_You

    Road trips, practice, shoot arounds, games. That’s more than enough time away from your kids. A full careers worth of that is enough for a decent parent. You either don’t have kids or aren’t a decent parent. It’s one or the other.

    It’s hilarious you think you know CP well enough to dictate he should/does feel about being there for his family. I’m a great dad, so I can relate to his sentiments. You can’t because you have no understanding of what it’s like to raise another person.

  • Above_You

    No genius, no one said that. No one said anything even remotely close. You are reaching because you have little wisdom in that opinion of yours. Wanting to spend as much time with your children while they are in the most crucial developmental years of their lives isn’t abnormal, even for an athlete. This isn’t a new and exciting concept.

    CP3′s opinion in more in line with mine than it is with yours. He definitely wouldn’t agree that he’d get bored with his family.

  • Above_You

    Don’t have kids. You’re already a deadbeat.

  • Ei_Ehm

    Are you proud of yourself now? Do you feel like such a big person for calling someone out on the internet? Your kids must be so proud of you!

  • Busta213

    Does good parenting include using profanities on a public website where people of all ages are welcomed? Thats good role-model-behaviour from all the way up there on your high horse.
    ;o)
    Its possible to work AND be a good parent

  • Above_You

    Is that your pic? You are way too old to troll. Get a life, asap.

  • Above_You

    I bet you thought you were dropping wisdom when you typed that, genius.

    This isn’t a working parent vs. stay at home parent debate. Go find someone else to entertain your straw man arguments.

  • Ei_Ehm

    You sound like a very angry person. Do you also take out this anger on your wife and kids or do you just vent out on the internet? Maybe you are the one that really needs to grow up. In all seriousness, your family must hate your guts.

  • Busta213

    1) Do you work to provide for your family?
    2) i didnt say CP3 should or shouldnt do anything

  • Busta213

    So you disagree? You think that IS good role-model behaviour? You seem to be presenting yourself as the authority on good parenting…..

    I didnt make a straw man argument – I made a statement. That does not mean you couldnt agree with the statement – I dont know you or your position on the subject.

  • Dfrance

    By your logic, every professional athlete with kids is an absentee father. You do realize that is what you’re saying right? Not even gonna argue anything else. What you’re saying is any pro athlete, or anyone else for that matter, who has kids and is financially stable, should retire as to not be an absentee parent.

    If you don’t see how stupid that is, I’m done responding.

  • Dfrance

    I NEVER said he’d get bored with his family. You’re so fake outraged by people implying he’d miss the game of basketball, or that he can play and still be a good dad that you’re not even listening to the points.

    Chris Paul, by all accounts, is financially set right now, shouldn’t he retire if he doesn’t want to miss anything?. At what point, if he continues playing does he become an absentee parent? What is “retire a little earlier than expected” mean exactly?

    Part of being a parent is making these tough decisions. Maybe miss a birthday party because you’re doing something that goes towards the bigger picture. He’s not just playing a game, he gets paid very very well to play NBA basketball. He’s being a good parent simply by going out there and playing and providing a lifestyle for his kids that many can only dream of.

    At the same time if he felt the need to hang it up today, because he missed his kids I would NEVER fault him for that. But I can also guess that a part of him will miss the game, even if he’s perfectly fine just watching his kids grow.

  • http://twitter.com/sooperfadeaway nbk

    this is amazing though, i mean, someone really has to say something outrageous to get YOU to react with this many words.

  • Dfrance

    Lol, kinda disappointed in myself. I keep leaving the site and coming back.

  • http://twitter.com/sooperfadeaway nbk

    i have been considering taking a step back as well

  • Dfrance

    Am I tripping on this tho?

  • http://twitter.com/sooperfadeaway nbk

    no, lol, not at all.

  • Above_You

    You gave that moron a de facto co-sign the moment you began defending his position.

    Technically speaking he is an absentee parent most of the year. Any parent who spends most of the year not raising their children is, which is something he obviously is aware of if he is already considering early retirement. It is what it is. I’m not going to say that athletes are separate from the rest of society. We all have to be there for our kids. Are you intentionally being dense or you are really that aloof? IF HE DIDN’T FEEL LIKE HE DIDN’T SPEND MUCH TIME AWAY FROM HIS KIDS HE WOULDN’T HAVE SAID IT. And to be clear, money doesn’t raise children. If you think simply making a lot of money is all it takes to be a great parent then you are beyond misguided. CP recognizes this. Unfortunately, you don’t. I just think it’s stupid of you and those other fools to pretend you know how a man feels about his family and parenting more than he does. If you can’t relate, that’s on you.

    How much he misses the game is irrelevant to this conversation, and adds nothing to whatever point you are trying to make. Who said he wouldn’t? I’m saying retiring early, regardless of what he achieves on the court, makes him a better parent. Being a better parent>>>>>>>>anything a person can achieve on a basketball court. It’s just a game. Any parent who raises their child is a better parent than the one who isn’t around, regardless of the reason.

  • Above_You

    You pretended to understand a father’s priorities, as well as what it takes to be a good parent. Nothing else you have to say on the subject is meaningful or insightful, after proclaiming June to September as adequate time for effective parenting. Your opinion on the subject became nothing more than a joke to me after that first comment of yours. Have a good day.

  • Above_You

    Go away, troll. At this point all you are doing is cyber stalking. Stop begging for attention. It’s creepy.

  • Above_You

    Trying to bait someone to discuss an unrelated topic is what people do when they have nothing meaningful to say on the actual subject being discussed. How old are you? You have to be young to think that was an actual contribution to the topic. Don’t post to me unless there is some intelligence in your comments.

  • Above_You

    “Anyone else who has a kid and is financially stable should retire”…

    If that’s what you read then you need reading comprehension help big time.

    How can you argue that anyone who is absent from raising their child is NOT an absentee parent? You don’t have to be intentionally malicious or neglectful to be an absentee parent. Sorry you can’t understand that. I’ll pray for ya.

    FYI, I wasn’t having kids early in my 20′s while I was still traveling and partying all over. I know this may be hard for you to understand, but part of wise family planning is waiting until you have the time to actually do it. Athletes tend to have a kids young, often out of wedlock, and with multiple women (CP excluded). The average pro athletes’s career ends in the early to mid 30′s. It won’t kill anyone to wait a little longer to start a family. You act like the way these guys have kids is somehow an ideal route to take.

  • Dfrance

    “You act like the way these guys have kids is somehow an ideal route to take”

    How can you make the above assumption from anything I’ve posted in this thread? Save your prayers and your condescending tone, we’ll just have to agree to disagree. You think, by default, a pro athletes lifestyle makes for an absentee parent. I feel that you can still be a great parent while managing a hectic pro athlete lifestyle.

    While the sentiment of CP3′s comments are great, I find that circumstances change over time and he may feel better about his ability to juggle family life as his career goes on. He’s not the first, nor will he be the last athlete to hint at early retirement, only to change their minds later.

    In any event, this is all subjective, there is no 100% right or wrong answer and we can go back and forth all day, but I’m done here.

  • Above_You

    “I feel that you can still be a great parent while managing a hectic pro athlete lifestyle.”

    I agree that it is best to agree to disagree. The above statement is the absolute root of our difference of opinion. I’m not saying athletes don’t care about their children. I’m saying you have to actually be there at least throughout most of their childhood to be a great parent. Caring about/loving your children doesn’t automatically=great parent. You have to actually be there, hands on. That’s really my bottom line.

    I understand CP 100% because his perspective would be my own if I were in his shoes, though as I said, having children before I was done regularly traveling around wouldn’t have been an option for me. Different people have different ways to raise children, and I honestly feel that being hands on is the best way to do it.

  • Above_You

    No one who would write what he wrote is capable of understanding what you are trying to explain, however simple it is.

Advertisement