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Thursday, August 18th, 2011 at 10:35 am  |  87 responses

Michael Jordan in Favor of Hard Salary Cap, Revenue Sharing


The NBA has forbidden team owners and front-office staff from talking about labor issues during the lockout. Michael Jordan, owner of the Charlotte Bobcats, seems to have not gotten the memo. From the Herald Sun: “Jordan, majority owner and operations boss for the Charlotte Bobcats, is banned from elaborating on the rift between owners and players that threatens to destroy the upcoming season. But he insists small-market teams, such as the Bobcats and [Andrew] Bogut’s Bucks, will never be able to compete while the system allows clubs such as the Miami Heat to effectively pounce on free agents with blank cheques. ‘The model we’ve been operating under is broken. We have 22 or 23 teams losing money, (so) I think we have gotta come to some kind of understanding in this partnership that we have to realign,’ Jordan said. ‘I can’t say so much … but I know the owners are not going to move off what we feel is very necessary for us to get a deal in place where we can co-exist as partners. We need a lot of financial support throughout the league as well as revenue sharing to keep this business afloat. We have stars like Bogut who are entitled to certain type of demands. But for us to be profitable in small markets, we have to be able to win ballgames and build a better basketball team.’ Jordan said small-market teams would benefit greatly from a ‘hard’ salary cap, and it would allow clubs such as Milwaukee to plan a future on key players including the Australian centre.”

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  • ham

    MJ can do what ever he wants

  • BostonBaller

    ….

  • http://cnbc.com JTaylor21

    Is this a joke? It looks like MJ has as much knowledge on how the free agency system works as he does on judging talent.

  • MikeC.

    I guess since there’s a lockout, Jordan can’t be fined for tampering(commenting on other teams’ players that are under contract)?

  • ai come back

    im so confused why is bogut brought up???

  • http://slamonline.com Ugh

    You sure can count on the Herald Sun to print something said off record, totally unrelated to the issue at hand and finding something tangentially jingoistic to tie it back to.
    Top shelf journalism, as always.

  • bon3

    @ai – Probably because Jordan was talking to an Aussie newspaper who presumably lead with a Bogut-tinged question and grouped the small market Bucks and Bobcats together in the same ‘category’ of NBA teams when interviewing MJ.

  • Allenp

    Hard cap. Partially guaranteed contracts. Shorter deals. Different split of the BRI. Exactly how are the owners “negotiating” when their demands have been the same from Day One?

  • LA Huey

    Everyone cites Miami as the problem. The Heat are hardly over the cap when you compare them to the Lakers, Celtics, and Mavericks. Ridiculous how people cite the Heat as having some gargantuan payroll.

  • LA Huey

    Also, as a former superstar who netted $30+ million per year his last couple runs with Chicago (which I think was still bargain for Reinsdorf) is he going to speak up on how the max salary for individual players is unfair?

  • http://cnbc.com JTaylor21

    Co-sign LA Huey. If MJ was playing today, dude would be making 35+ mill a year and you won’t hear a peep from him but now he’s an owner that made bad decision after bad decision, he wants change?

  • http://itsahardwoodlife.blogspot.com omphalos

    Bogut is mentioned because it’s an Australian newspaper and they always try and make things relevant for Aussies by asking about their most high-profile player.

  • dma

    Well excuse Miami for playing their salary cap situation to get under the cap while remaining competitive and also offering a nightlife filled with more than cold winters, beer and cheese.

    I’m still scratching my head in how Miami was eligible to sign mike miller to the mid level exception since I had that the exception could only be used with teams over the salary cap.

  • John

    As a player, it’d be dumb to turn down that kind of money. As an owner, it’d be dumb to not try and renegotiate the system.

  • Trout

    I’m findig it hard to care at the bilionares and millionares fighting for poor peoples cash …what a joke.

  • bike

    LeBron took a pay cut to play for Miami. How is that pouncing on free agents with blank cheques?

  • Jer dawg

    Watch David Stern turn blind eye because it’s his previous cash cow from back in the 90s. Jordan will probably get warning. I’d be surprised if he is fined.

  • http://Slamonline nbk

    Apparently Michael Jordan is under the impression there is no salary cap…..YOU left Baseball in 96 Mike! A blank check would imply these guys are getting more money then everyone else, when really they make about 60% of the highest paid player in the league’s salary.

  • jbone23

    I understand the argument about the Heat not having a giant salary cap by users here, but part of the problem with small market teams’ lack of success is also the peripheral aspects of a city/team. Places like Miami and LA have another leg up because of the city life and weather in the area. And while that’s not their fault, we can’t just start having teams only in good weather locations. Us folks up North will have no teams soon (Milwaukee stand up [in a warm coat]!)

  • http://bleacherreport.com/articles/791470-lebron-james-vs-dwyane-wade-who-is-the-better-player/page/8 nbk

    It’s funny that people are soooo worried about the market (they should be) but before the decision people were talking about how it doesn’t matter in this day and age, you’ll get your exposure if your great. That’s what they were saying about Cleveland. — And you know what else people were saying before the decision? That the league was growing and making money. — And the league was smaller at the time, with the same exact financial structure.

  • LA Huey

    ^I remember that. “LeBron doesn’t need to go to NY because a superstar is a superstar”.

  • T-Money

    what’s that blank check he’s talking about?! every team under the cap were able to offer as much, if not more, than miami. miami is not even a big market per se, it’s just a nice city to live in. like san diego in football. sorry mike there is no hard cap that’s going to make raleigh and milwaukee more attractive than miami, all things being equal.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Y’all acting like you expected Jordan to make an intelligent well-thought out comment. Come on now.

  • http://bleacherreport.com/articles/791470-lebron-james-vs-dwyane-wade-who-is-the-better-player/page/8 nbk

    Allen – He’s an owner. He probably shouldn’t have made any comment, actually I bet he gets fined for saying what he did, I didn’t expect him to speak on the matter at all, especially to an Australian news outlet.

  • http://slamonline.com Bryan Crawford

    Since nobody else bothered to say so, I will: At least we know where MJ stands considering he’s the only person who’s been on both sides of this issue.
    Carry on with the anti-Jordan speak…

  • LA Huey

    ^filling in for Bull22, I see.

  • T-Money

    BC: um, everybody knew where he stood. he’s a FORMER player, and a CURRENT owner.

  • http://slamonline.com Bryan Crawford

    @LA Huey: Now, you know better than that.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    MJ is about his money. It was a given where he stood.

  • http://slamonline.com Bryan Crawford

    @T-Money: Uhm, nobody knew where he stood because he never said anything. And I find your comment especially funny considering you’ve long argued against speculation and assumption without factual evidence.
    See Delonte West and Glo James.

  • http://slamonline.com Bryan Crawford

    @Allen: MJ could’ve been one of those owners who “allegedly” wants to have a season and wants to get a deal done. Nothing is a “given.”

  • John

    ^Sure, but the GOAT is owner of a small-market team with a history of making bad decisions. One can safely assume where he stands in the labor dispute.

  • http://bleacherreport.com/articles/791470-lebron-james-vs-dwyane-wade-who-is-the-better-player/page/8 nbk

    He’s the owner of the Bobcats. Him being in support of revenue sharing, was a given.

  • http://slamonline.com Bryan Crawford

    There used to be a time where “safe assumptions” didn’t exist around here. Have I been gone that long?

  • John

    ^So factual evidence is necessary to proceed onward in any situation now? How the hell do you pickup women?

  • T-Money

    bc: you’re seriously going to lump the delonte thing and this together? and if you want to play that game how was the delonte thing a safe assumption? based on mj’s track record (he’s all about his money, all the time), wasn’t this a safe(r) assumption? and the way you brought up the fact that he’s been on both sides of the issue kinda implied that his opinion had more weight, because he could see it from both sides, correct? well, i beg to differ, mj always sees it from his bottom line. he made 36 mil in his last year with the bulls (granted, he was always underpaid) but does that lead you to believe he would have been in favor of a hard cap then?

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    I see the point on assumptions.
    But, we are talking about Michael Jordan!
    If there is something that boy cares about beyond money, basketball, his daddy and p)ussy, I’d like to hear about it. LOL.
    Nah, seriously, I never even considered that Jordan would stand up for the players. Once he stopped playing, he stopped caring about the players.

  • T-Money

    bc: as i’ve said, the glo and delonte thing got deaded when bron and delonte hugged and talked after game 5. people who still want to speculate after that just want it to be true. no man hugs a former teammate who supposedly did that on the down low. / and also, the owners who “allegedly” want to save the season are the ones who don’t give a eff about a hard cap and/or have a legit chance of a title. i’ve heard rumors about cuban, arison, dolan and buss wanting a season. again, very predictable. why would anyone advocate for anything else than their personal interest?

  • http://www.forbes.com/lists/2010/32/basketball-valuations-11_Charlotte-Bobcats_322435.html nbk

    Its not even an assumption. The Bobcats are worth 284 Million Dollars – The Lakers for Example are worth 584 Million Dollars. Anyone that knows how much Michael Jordan is obsessed with winning can figure out he will be in favor of anything that gives him a chance to be competitive. — In the least, its a given that Micahel Jordan will be in support of any changes that allow him to keep his team & avoid losing money. You can click my name for Forbes financial outlook of the Charlotte Bobcats & any other team in the league.

  • http://slamonline.com Bryan Crawford

    T-Money, it’s not really about the Glo and Delonte thing at all. I just used that as an example.
    And besides the usual suspects (owners who have legit shots at titles), who knows, there could be more owners out there who actually want to play, but until they say something (which they aren’t allowed to), we shouldn’t just blindly assume that they’re all on this unified front.

  • T-Money

    nbk: this is about money as you pointed out but it has nothing to do with competitiveness. small market owners want to be in the black and not in the red. and that’s fair, they’re pushing for their own interest. but fans should not be fooled. if nobody can go over the cap and everybody offers the same money – isn’t that even MORE of an incentive to go LA, NY, Miami, Chicago? in the current system, small markets can overpay for joe johnson, rudy gay, etc. if the money is the same everywhere, fringe stars and solid role players will all sign for the same 6-7 teams. that personally does not bother me as i don’t care about parity, but let’s no kid ourselves – the lockout is about money, not competitiveness.

  • http://slamonline.com Bryan Crawford

    For example, the Grizzlies are a small market team that isn’t very profitable, but you saw their Playoff run. You think they want to lose a season? What about OKC?

  • http://www.forbes.com/lists/2010/32/basketball-valuations-11_Charlotte-Bobcats_322435.html nbk

    I didn’t say it like the lockout is about competitiveness. I said it like Michael Jordan is about competitiveness. — And then I said, in the least he’s interested in keeping his team and avoiding losing money. Meaning that (even if I butchered the saying and totally said the opposite of what I meant) Michael Jordan is worried about making his money first, but will also be in support of anything that gives him a chance to remain competitive. — And about your if everyone was making the same amount they would all go to the same 6 or 7 teams comment, uhm no. That’s the whole point of the salary cap, and a hard cap at that. Too keep teams from hogging talent.

  • http://slamonline.com Bryan Crawford

    To say that the lockout is solely about money is a half-truth. Yes, it’s about money, but owners also want to have winning teams because winning teams make more money.

  • LA Huey

    ^Agree. If it was just about money, the owners would all just follow the Sterling formula.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    I don’t see how a salary cap improves smaller teams chances to win rings.
    The best players will sign the best deals, and likely stay in the best markets, If you can’t exceed your cap to offer the best players more money, then what incentive do they have to stay with your team when things are rough?
    What we’ve seen regularly in the NFL is that teams are only good if they draft well, and can manage to underpay their best players for a few years. Once people get a chance to get paid, most teams break up.
    This is about money. Restricting player movement and instituting a hard cap will not improve parity. It hasn’t in the NFL. The same bums teams are always the same bum teams for the most part until they finally get new front offices and make good drafts. Nothing to do with free agency.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Huey
    If they all had the same market base as Sterling, they would.
    But in LA you can make money with a barebones payroll because people have enough disposable income to still come to games. That ain’t the case in New Orleans, or with the Bucks. In those cities, disposable income is harder to come by, so unless your team has a great relationship with fans, which the NBA does not, people don’t want to come unless you’re winning.
    Sterling can fill his house even while losing. That ain’t an option in most places.

  • John

    ^Co-sign the Sterling example.
    Salary caps may not be intended to create parity, but instead give superstar players the option to choose between a fat contract or chase rings. In Miami’s case, stars had to take paycuts to chase rings. Not all superstars would make the same choices. I’ve argued before that this is a superstar-centric league, and nothing’s changed. Salary caps increase the odds for small-market teams to sign big name players – not necessarily to contend for rings, but put butts in seats.

  • John

    Forgot to add that putting butts in seats helps immensely towards a ballclub’s bottom line and merchandise sales, but I figure that’s a given.

  • http://www.gil1906.com Pve_2

    I’d really like to hear about where the owners heads are at regarding revenue sharing. That’s a big deal and a potentially large source of income for smaller teams that does NOT involve the players at all.

  • Chukaz

    you know what the problem really is? the deals are too long and the non-super star contracts. i’m a laker fan so i’ll use them as en example. The lakers don’t have a problem w/ kobe’s salary. They don’t have a problem with gasol’s salary. No problem with bymun and odom’s salaries. Our problem? Luke Walton, Steve Blake, Ron Artest. Teams always over pay role players. Think of big contracts. Most of them are good. The only bad big contracts belong to Eddy Curry, Rashard Lewis, and Gilbert Arenas. There’s probably something like 60 big contracts in the league (think 15+ million a yr) and only 3 of them are bad. If joe johnson’s contract was 4 yrs instead of 6 you wouldn’t think of it was a bad contract. Now think of mid level exception contracts. I’m sure 70% of them are bad. Look at the grizzlies. They payed a ton of money to rudy gay and Z-Bo and that’s okay. The problem? Mike Conley’s contract. How do you give 50 million to a guy who’s not one of the top 15 players at his position?

  • http://slamonline.com Bryan Crawford

    Allen, I have to disagree on your Sterling example. Pre-Blake Griffin, people didn’t go to Clippers games at all. The only time Staples Center filled up for Clippers games were for the games against the marquee teams. And even that was hit or miss sometimes.
    But now that Sterling has BGriffin, I honestly think that he could still care less about winning because now he has arguably the most exciting young player in the NBA. People go to Clippers games to see him dunk, not to see that team win.
    He’s probably the only owner in the NBA with a win-win situation right now.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Bryan
    You have to check the history. Sterling’s teams have always been profit makers because he draws just enough fans and sells just enough merchandise despite being a loser team. I’m not saying he’s drawing Lakers crowds, I’m saying that even a “bad” crowd in L.A. is pretty good compared to the pickings in some of these smaller cities.
    Chukaz
    With just Gasol, Kobe and Artest the Lakers are at the $45 million hard cap. Seriously. Kobe makes like $23 million, Gasol makes right about $18 million and Artest makes $7 million.
    That’s three players. If you substitute Bynum, who makes $13 million, for Artest, the Lakers are already over the cap and they only have THREE players on their roster.
    A hard cap affects everybody. Even the superstars. It depresses everybody’s salaries, and it doesn’t even include the automatic lump sum payments that players receive in the NFL. Hell, Mike Vick signed the richest deal in NFL history back in the day, and he got $20 million in guaranteed money. Kobe makes that in his base salary, and will make more than that for the next three years.
    The hard cap will change the financial landscape of the entire league.

  • http://slamonline.com Bryan Crawford

    And I’m tired of hearing about how the Heat players took a pay cut just play together and then people celebrate it as if it’s some sort of shining example of how players care more about winning than money. Please…
    Look, they each lost $15M over the life of their six-year deals which means they’re only giving up $2.5M/year. That’s only a minor sacrifice, not some groundbreaking and momentous achievement in NBA history.
    Now, had those guys taken a pay cut of $15M PER SEASON over the life of their deals, well, now we’re talking about something.

  • http://www.forbes.com/lists/2010/32/basketball-valuations-11_Charlotte-Bobcats_322435.html nbk

    Chuk – While I pretty much agree with what your saying. Big contracts can and often do become issues, especially if the Salary Cap gets any lower. FE using your Lakers and Kobe Bryant – We will assume the CBA doesn’t change, so the salary cap is $56.1 Million, Kobe’s production drops a little again, say he goes for 23PPG, 4APG, 4RPG on like 44% shooting at some point in the next 3 years (what he is under Contract for). Would he be worth half your salary cap? or even more? He is slated to make $25 Million in 2011-12, $27 Million in 2012-13, and $30 Million in 2013-14. While that is probably closer to his actual worth to the Lakers (in terms of how much revenue he alone generates) that is still a massive roadblock towards building a championship caliber team if your not allowed to go over the salary cap for outside players. IMO the whole system needs to be revamped not just adjusted.

  • bull22

    i find it funny how many of you morons badmouth michael jordan and yet dont own an nba team… a hardcap and revenue sharing is needed in the nba, even a disgruntled jerry jones needed to let go of some of his revenue.. thanks MJ for speaking up!

  • bull22

    give credit where credit is do, MJ and jerry richardson are of very few who
    have played and owned a franchise. perhaps both have had a hand in making some bad decisions, but who of us would not trade places with them to at least
    atry and run a franchise..

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    bull22 idk if you have an issue with actually reading the comments, or you just speak in fictional generalities, but nobody is saying Michael Jordan is wrong. Everyone is just saying, DUH we already knew he felt that way. Except B.C. who knew it, but didn’t want to say it as an assumption before he had confirmation.

  • add

    how the tables have turned

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Well, I’m saying he’s wrong. A $45 million hard cap, or even a $53 million hard cap with zero guarantees on contracts is bogus.
    I don’t watch the NFL for three main reasons:
    1. The game is so violent it’s becoming a bloodsport and I feel uncomfortable watching people kill themselves for my entertainment.
    2. I feel like the players get treated like children by their commissioner and there are some racial undertones to that treatment.
    3. I feel like they are getting screwed as far as the salary structure.
    I don’t want to see the NBA become the new NFL. I think it’s blatantly unjust to have players get paid less if they underperform, but not get paid more if they overperform, and I’m deeply bothered by the power shift occurring in the League.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Well if they have Revenue Sharing and a Hard Cap (with a fair amount of money going to the players) then I understand and can see it working and being fairly competitive for the majority of the league (however i am well aware though that the owners offer with these rules is/was not fair). IDK where you got “zero guarantees on contracts” from, nowhere does it say that, and nowhere have I read that, that is what the owners offered.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    That’s true. They said like 65 percent guaranteed. I should have written that.
    But, if the contract can decrease by 35 percent, it should be able to increase by 35 percent.

  • bike

    Whatever one thinks of what MJ is saying, it’s revealing to hear one owner’s take on things. This is sounding more and more like the owners are not going to budge an inch on this thing. Whatever one’s opinion is about this labor dispute–whether the owners are to blame or the players are to blame—it looks like at the very least the league has had some very serious issues. The player/owner relationship is becoming so poisonous that it might be coming close to the point of no return even after when the players eventually cave in. What we might be witnessing is the beginning of the end.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    I thought they offered 4-year guaranteed max? — Or was that just the max total length of a contract? — And I also read that the players actually accepted those terms, but only if there was no hard cap, which the owners are not budging on. ANd isn’t the real reason we as overly interested fans who normally seek out as much information as possible don’t know the current offers because the owners aren’t actually united on their demands?

  • biged

    I think the owners feel like thy don’t have a fair chance to compete for free agents, but I tony think tat is true The owners just need to learn how to better manage their teams that’s all. you can’t give out all of thesr bad contracts then get mad at the players for accpeting thr money.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    According to Kevin Love, :“Love said the players don’t want to see years cut off guaranteed contracts and are not pleased with a proposal that they could lose money if not playing up to their contracts. He also said that the proposed revenue split (50-50, rather than the 57-43 split in favor of players) is unacceptable.
    I read that to mean partial guarantees based on performance. I think they have to roll back the BRI split and they have to shorten deals. That’s it. They should be able to do a deal just based on that with revenue sharing.

  • http://Slamonline nbk

    Ok that makes sense. I read from I believe Larry Coon that said the players were willing to make those changes (shortened contracts & little less revenue) but only if the cap is not made into a hard cap & players still get something like 53%. I follow him on twitter and it was in june i believe.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    ^ CO-SIGN. That should be more than enough.

  • bg

    @la huey check your sources. MJ did not make $30mil his last few in Chicago. He took less to make sure the team could buy the players they needed to compete. He made enough on endorsements

  • http://Slamonline nbk

    Michael Jordan made $33,140,000.00 in 1997-98 & $30,140,000.00 in 96-97. Basketball-Reference

  • http://jayemmbee23.tumblr.com Clutch Performer

    well it works in the nhl. do we really want an mlb situation where only the yankees and red sox can compete? where teams like the blue jays who have winning records still cant make the playoffs. in nhl the leafs were the yankees of hockey paying their way to the playoffs after there lockout and salary cap and bad drafting they are in the hockeys crap bin and lower markets like carolina are making winning runs. i want the nba to be like nhl or nfl where almost every year some one has a chance. so i cant hate on mike for what hes saying but hes got a unique view having been player and now owner.

  • http://twitter.com/BeezKneezy LA Huey

    @nbk, thanks for backing me up.
    @Clutch Performer, here are your World Series champs in the last ten years: ’10 Giants, ’09 Yankees, ’08 Phillies, ’07 Red Sox, ’06 Cardinals, ’05 White Sox, ’04 Red Sox, ’03 Marlins, ’02 Angels, ’01 Diamondbacks. Notice Boston and New York have combined for 3 championships during that time. Furthermore, in the NFL, since 2001, two teams have combined for half a decade’s worth of championships.
    Also, your point about teams with winning records missing out on the playoffs have more to do with MLB rules that only allow for 8 out of 30 teams to participate in the postseason. I’m not sure what your point was about that considering my city’s Seahawks made it into the 2011 playoffs with a losing record.

  • http://Slamonline nbk

    Gotchu slamily

  • http://slamonline.com Ugh

    “Michael Jordan made $33,140,000.00 in 1997-98 & $30,140,000.00 in 96-97.” I distinctly remember that it was 20 and 25 million. Inflation isn’t high enough to make that much of a difference – unless they’re weighing inflation against the Euro (lol, etc).
    All of those Bulls players were underpaid and not by choice. That’s why everyone fled town after the second threepeat. Reinsdorf was a cheapskate.

  • Youngindy21

    A hard cap helps teams because it sets a limit to how much a team can spend on players. That being said, It helps prevent teams from overpaying sad role players. In the old system a small market would have to overpay sad role players because they risked losing them to the big markets because teams like LA and Dallas can spend A LOT more money on players. This puts small-market teams at a disadvantage because LA spends 90 million dollars on players salaries. I am just using LA as an example. This means LA can severely overpay a sad role player(s) and still be able to afford its high paid Superstars. However if a team like Indiana paid Dahntay Jones(role player) what LA could afford to pay him then Indiana would not be able to resign a star such as Danny Granger because they can’t afford to go over the cap and pay the luxury tax.

  • ab40

    shut up fellas and some girls. A hard cap is bad for the leauge. Especialy if they let it be like that for 5 years. Makes no sense oh and MJ is a cheapskate probably one of the poorer owners in the L so of course he wants that. He got his in the last few years but before that he made a max of 8 mil per? some low single digit million number like that.

  • Justin

    Kind of funny how a lot of guys are pointing out how much Jordan made in his last 3 years in the league. How many remember when he was the 37th highest paid player in the late 80′s/early 90′s and told management to spend the money to get better players on the team? Reinsdorf had said giving Michael that money was a thank you for what he’s done for the organization since he’s been there. They went from something like 8000 fans to sell outs every night for 20 years. How many individuals can make that claim for their team?

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Nobody is arguing that Jordan didn’t deserve it. We’re pointing out that with a HARD CAP there is no way he could have ever gotten those salaries and still had a competitive team.
    And in the NFL the same few teams, Steelers and Patriots, have dominated the last decade with only minor blips from the Saints and Giants.
    People complain about player turnover, but in the NFL, there is CRAZY player turnover.

  • LA Huey

    I specifically noted earlier in this section how I thought he was still underpaid in his last couple years. You could field a team with just Jordan and mascots and still sell out an arena.
    Also, the NFL’s single-game-elimination playoff system has a lot to do with their perceived parity. In a one-and-done playoff format, the best team doesn’t always win. You catch a superior team asleep and you can beat them (see ’08 Giants, ’11 Seahawks).

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    ^Very good point man. I hadn’t even thought of that difference. That is so true, like the NCAA. Strangely nobody really thinks there is parity in the NCAA as a whole, but they do believe that the tournament allows a lot of random teams to compete. Very good point.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    All of you (that are arguing about Jordan’s last years in Chicago) need to realize there are 2 reasons for the current financial system in the NBA. The first, Kevin Garnett signed a 6-year $126M Contract (unheard of amount of money at the time) – and Michael Jordan made over $63M over his last 2 seasons (because he excluded himself from the NBPA and had right to negotiate his image….which is why he wasn’t in video games. FOr Example) – So the NBA Owners decided they didn’t want this turning into Baseball – So they enacted the current (or real close to it) CBA. – And the figure I used for Jordan’s salary is on Basketball-References website, inflation has absolutely nothing to do with it.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    He wasn’t excluded from the NBPA.
    He didn’t allow the group to package his likeness with everyone else’s, but he was still part of the union.
    He just negotiated one year deals and there was no salary cap in place. They say that one of the reasons he retired in 1998 was because of the potential lockout, along with other stuff. Anyway, just wanted to clear that up. He was part of the union, but he refused to sign off on the union allowing video games to use his likeness. Those are separate issues.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Yeah my bad I didn’t mean he was excluded as in not part of the union. I meant the league had no rights to his image. He signed 1-year contracts (just 2 of them) after his 8-year contract he signed in 1988 expired. (The Bulls paid the full length of the contract, even when he was playing baseball. and at the time, the $20M 8-Year contract was the biggest in NBA history. (Well Magic Johnson signed a 25 year, 25 Million Dollar Contract in 1980 but that was so long I don’t count it.) His 1 year $30M and 1 year $33M contracts at the time equaled more money then entire teams, and that irked owners. my bad on the last comment that was a mess

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    I’m thinking of a new blog post about all-time NBA backcourts. And the best current backcourts.
    Here is the all-time list
    Top Five NBA backcourts:
    1. Isiah and Joe Dumars
    2. Walt and Pearl
    3. West and Goodrich
    4. K.C. and Sam
    5. Porter and Drexler
    Thoughts?

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    That’s a solid idea. There was a similar post on the winningest tandems on wageofwins. Click my name Allen — Also, what about Rick Barry and Jamaal Wilkes? Or was Wilkes playing a forward spot for those Warriors teams?

  • http://wagesofwins.net/2011/08/09/the-winningest-tandems/ nbk

    my bad, click my name on this post.

  • http://philosopher.view@blogspot.com The Philosopher

    Magic and Byron…

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