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Monday, February 13th, 2012 at 1:25 pm  |  57 responses

Jeremy Lin to Cash in on His Newfound Fame in Asia?


The NBA’s newest – and most unexpected – sensation, Jeremy Lin, could potentially see a nice boost in his bank account from endorsement partners in North America and the Far East if he can keep up some of his exploits. Reuters has the details: “That storyline alone would make the 23-year-old Californian an attractive proposition to advertisers, but add in the fact he was born to Taiwanese parents and you would, it seems, have marketing gold on your hands. ‘There’s no question brands will be interested in Jeremy Lin,’ Jeremy Walker, head of sports marketing and branded entertainment for GolinHarris, told Reuters by telephone from Hong Kong on Monday. ‘You only have to look at what Yao Ming has done not just for the NBA but for brands that he represents both in the States and in China. Every top Chinese star that comes out from the Olympic Games or wherever it might be, there’s always going to be an awful lot of interest for brands because all the major brands in the world are still looking to China for growth. A lot of brands want that positive ‘halo effect’ association they are going to get from being involved with a superstar.’ China has long been the National Basketball Association (NBA)’s biggest market outside North America and the league is the country’s most popular sporting import despite the retirement of former Houston Rockets centre Yao Ming.”

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  • shutup

    Wish nothing but the best for him, a few more good games and he will never have to think about sleeping on anyone’s couch.

  • http://facebook.com/tronjohnson Chief

    What shoes will he be rockin?
    Nike
    Chucks
    Adidas
    Reebok
    Tune in to find out

  • http://slamonline.com The Black Rick Kamla

    @shutup, dude’s got a Bachelors in Econ from Harvard I don’t think he’ll ever have to think about sleeping on someone elses couch. It will be interesting exactly how he is received/branded in China particularly because of his faith………anyways, If Li-Ning wants to ever be about anything they need to find a way to get dude on lock….that would be low-key major. Air Lin’s…if nothing else that could start a boom within the Asian community, and a spike in sales/brand recognition like no shoe brand of recent. Make the money happen

  • http://www.optimabbc.be Max

    JLin is about to start in the ASG next year…

  • Heals

    He better cause we all know everybody else is tryin to cash in off him as well…

  • http://nyill.wordpress.com/ O

    Funny how supposedly, LeBron is dying to be break big into China’s market like Kobe has. Jeremy Lin done did it in a week and change. Hope Jeremy proves that these games aren’t a fluke and can cement his spot on the Knicks roster for years to come. Just hope D’Antoni doesn’t burn him out…

  • http://nyill.wordpress.com Enigmatic

    “@shutup, dude’s got a Bachelors in Econ from Harvard I don’t think he’ll ever have to think about sleeping on someone elses couch.” hmm…
    I’m guessing Black Rick Kamla is one of the three NBA fans that isn’t aware that since Lin signed a contract with the Knicks he’s been crashing at his brother’s apartment.
    Sleeping on his couch.
    Econ degree from Harvard and all.
    Anyways, I’m all for dude getting paid! Get that money because either way, if this lasts dude’s underpaid, and if it doesn’t, at least he’ll have gotten some extra cheddar thanks to it.
    I do hope his success lasts tho.
     

  • http://all-heat-erthing.tumblr.com/ cramzy

    @max, I was just about to say, he’s going to have one of those guard spots on lock for years at this rate. Who’s going to be out, D.Wade or D.Rose?

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    @ BLack Rick: Good point about Li Ning but PEAK is actually probably China’s most successful brand in America. They’ve got Kevin Love and Kyle Lowry on their roster already. Adding Jeremy Lin would put them over the top.
    lol @ Max.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    I really do hope Jeremy Lin plays for team China though. Without Yao Ming the best player on the team is Yi Jian Lian. Has anyone heard of any new prospects from China that might make it to the NBA? because I know very little about Chinese basketball. I know there was an 18 or 19-year-old kid who made the national team… Maybe he was 17. But yeah.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    LMAO Air Jordan and Adidas can’t be pleased with Lin taking Wade or Rose’s All-Star starter spot. ahaha.

  • http://facebook.com/tronjohnson Chief

    I will be pissed if Lin’s in the all-star game as a starter because of online voters. Unless he’s posting 25ppg, 10 asts, 5rebs and 2 steals he’s no way as good as Wade, Rose, Rondo, DWill. That East guard spot is a heavy title to bear naw mean?

  • http://hoopism.com airs

    oh snap, good point chief. i dunno why i forgot the public gets to pick starters…
    JLin allstar starter 2013 for sure. all of asia is gonna vote for him.
    TWICE.

  • shutup

    I dont think Lin can play for China, he’s an american citizen who was bor here, unless he applies for dual citizenship, and I dont know if China will allow that. case and point all the legal trouble with leaving the Chinese pro-league and the red tape getting Yao-Ming over here. Was gonna say he probably signs a deal with the Chinese shoe company, but couldnt remember the name and ling just sounded wrong, considering it was the name of the yellow character on Drawn Together

  • shutup

    oh and it was funny Jared Jeffries posted a pic of the couch he was sleeping on the other day, at least thats what espn said, because his brother was having a party and he needed to rest so he stayed at Jeffries apartment on his couch.

  • http://slamonline.com 1982

    Not that it matters since no one will remember this tidbit, but Taiwan and China aren’t the same country. China (Communist Country) claims Taiwan (Democratic Country – or tiny Island, if you’re checking) as its own, and Taiwan claims independence. The US is Taiwan’s biggest ally in this scenario, and is also the only reason China hasn’t moved in. If Lin plays for any Asian Olympics team, it would be for Taiwan, but Taiwan has mandatory Army service if you’re a citizen, so that won’t happen unless Taiwan decides to let him in with not attachment, and that likely won’t happen since there are actual Taiwanese born athletes and pro sports folks that skip town to avoid serving.

  • http://slamonline.com 1982

    Oh and @Shutup it wasn’t Jeffries, it was Landry Fields – I saw the picture.

  • http://slamonline.com 1982

    This didn’t post the first time, but @Shutup it wasn’t Jeffries, it was Landry Fields.

  • startown

    The NBA is fully aware of how a player will increase TV ratings in their respective country. The Knicks ratings will skyrocket now. I’m from MN and nobody watched the Wolves last year, now ratings are up 208% with Love, Rubio and D Williams and Barea. Rubio’s ratings in Spain are off the charts. It is good for business. Lin looks to be a good player, and will probably have a nice career (but I don’t have him the all star game just yet)?

  • Mike from Spain

    I for one got league pass to watch Rubio & the T-Wolves break my heart over and over… how can pro ballers miss so many open shots is beyond me.

  • polygonwindows

    on the notion of Lin possibly playing for Team China this summer…i do think it’s possible just like how Chris Kaman ended up playing for Germany during the last olympics… or a-rod played for team USA but then suited up for Dominican Republic during the two world baseball classics…both kaman and a-rod are U.S citizens yet they do have foreign background (as in, upbringing or the slim german heritage in Kaman’s case)…sports citizenship is much more lenient than actual citizenship, which can make things rather interesting during international competition..

    Lin’s parents are from Taiwan and the whole Taiwan-China thing is complicated indeed. In theory though, Lin suits up for China would be rather ironic for the Taiwanese people…then again if you look at Kaman’s case the degree of irony is right up there too…you get the idea…

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    I’m glad 1982 made that point about Taiwan. It’s been lost. Taiwanese and mainland Chinese have a very complicated relationship, and I imagine that Lin’s parents have mixed feelings about him being lumped in with the chinese in many people’s minds.

  • http://redoftoothandclaw.ca/ niQ

    @Chief’s first post. I could be wrong but I believe Jeremy Lin already has an existing 3 year contract with Nike. They should ALSO cash in by making a signature shoe for him… lol

  • shutup

    Wasnt aware of the China-Taiwan relationship, still dont think China would allow a citizen of another country to play on their national team. Thanks for the correction, maybe I was thinking Jeffries because he was on the Post with him.

  • http://nyill.wordpress.com/ O

    Lin should start rocking the Jordan IV’s in the Knicks colorway. http://sneakernews.com/2012/02/13/air-jordan-iv-retro-knicks-new-images/ Hardbody!

  • http://facebook.com/tronjohnson Chief

    Nike eh that’s cool, he’s wearing the hyperfuse’s if I am correct?
    I do feel that we’ve jumped the gun and assumed he’s from Mainland China and I apologize for that. I do feel that everyone has jumped the gun and just assumed he’s fo real after a week of good play. The fact that the lakers barely escaped T-Dot, and the strength of the opponents that Lin has played. I mean his biggest dunk was on the wizards who are atrocious right now. I think he might have a tough time in T-Dot but Amare’s return should give him room. I’d like to hope that as the Knicks pieces come back he makes them work otherwise he’s a low-paid option taking away from some high-paid pieces that D’Antoni couldn’t make work.

  • That Dude

    All this talk about Lin playing for China or Taiwan – how about the USA? I mean he was only born here and lived his whole life here. What’s a guy got to do? He could be pretty effective in the international game, and could be a good compliment to some of the superstars. Jeremy “Stop Asian profi” Lin!!!

  • LP

    Li-Ning shoes…please…its only right

  • ktokyo

    Jeremy Lin could actually become an important factor in Taiwan/China political relations. If he does continue to get better and become a (longterm) star in the league, he could stand up to China and declare Taiwan’s independence (as China does not recognize Taiwan as a country). With so many NBA fans in China and Lin declaring his allegiance to an independent Taiwan, it could put the censorship department in China in a bit of a pickle. If Lin stood up for a free and independent Taiwan, China would have to censor that from the Chinese population even though Lin would be a huge star in China.

  • That Dude

    @ktokyo Asian please, you really think a basketball player is going to “become an important factor” in Taiwan/China relations? A country born out of countless bloodshed and civil war after WW2

  • shutup

    No way Lin would make the USA team, as well as hes playing that team is gonna be made up of bonafide stars

  • http://slamonline.com The Black Rick Kamla

    @Enig….dang man harsh, who are the other two though??? Yeah won’t lie I haven’t been following basketball very closely this season

  • MikeC.

    Let’s let the kid figure out how to run the point full time before we ask him to solve the China-Taiwan political issues.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    @ 1982: Does Taiwan even have a national basketball team? I didn’t know that, which is why I assumed he might play for Mainland (if they let him).
    As for his roots, his grandparents were born in mainland China and moved to Taiwan, where I assume his parents were born. A lot of people in Taiwan whose families moved there later consider themselves Chinese. Taiwan is the “Republic of China” while the mainland is the “People’s Republic of China,” so I don’t think they’d be offended by being called Chinese. There’s no such thing as a Taiwanese language–they either speak Mandarin Chinese or a dialect that’s almost identical to Fujianese (a province in China).
    But some people do consider themselves Taiwanese. If they had a referendum right now it would probably be 50/50 in favor of reuniting with the mainland.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    Okay maybe their language/dialect would be called Taiwanese because they’ve been speaking it for so long in Taiwan.

  • ktokyo

    @ThatDude Ok, a factor in political relations might be a bit hyperbolic. But, he could, definitely, become a voice on the issue. An Ivy-league educated, Taiwanese-American NBA star. They aren’t a dime-a-dozen. Let’s just think about the shoe deal. You know millions of Chinese fans are paying attention to this rising Taiwanese-American star in the NBA. If a Chinese shoe company wanted to sign him, it would be politically incorrect for them to sign him knowing he supported an independent Taiwan and wanted to voice his support for this. However, the amount of money that could be earned by signing him would be too much to pass up. It would be a bit of a dilemma and people would be aware of it.

  • http://nyill.wordpress.com/ O

    Son said that after he’s done with basketball he wants to become a Pastor. He religious like that. So I doubt there’ll be any politics in his future…

  • http://obsessioncollection.wordpress.com grgeblck

    before you guys post any comments, please do some research before you even type it because the comments some of you guys made just made you guys look ignorant. China and Taiwan’s relationship is complicated for many years since back then. it’s not just a 1-2 year thing. so dun make yourself look stupid. And @Teddy-the-Bear, I would say the Taiwanese is their nationality, and their Race is Chinese. It’s the same as Chinese Singaporean, they wouldn’t call themselves Chinese as a nationality, they would said Singaporean as a nationality, and Chinese as their race (for the people who’s grandparents are from China as well)

  • polygonwindows

    @1982 (Here goes your daily trivial pursuit for all y’all none-Taiwanese folks. )Mandatory army service will be no more in 2014. It will be voluntary by then (well with a 4 months of basic training instead of the current 1 yr deal. Taiwan-born athletes have skipped town in the past to avoid army thingy, but if the team does really well on big international events, army-eligible athletes would get an exemption from the service. Much like what Korea’s done in the past with their World Baseball Classics guys. Come to think of it i’m not sure if and how the whole sports citizenship thing applies to places outside the U.S. But i’d assume that most countries are happy to make exceptions given the circumstances. It’d probably take 3 jeremy lins and a Yao Ming to make the Taiwanese national team really competitive internationally though.

    @ktokyo as lovely and wonderful as it sounds, it’d have to take someone A LOT greater than say an Asian version of Nelson Mandala, MLK Jr, Bono, AND Obama all rolled into one to make that happen. Taiwan-China relationship is an ongoing complex issue involved race, international politics, history, foreign relations and economy just to name a few. And it runs DEEP, generations-deep. Your idea is probably much more likely to come true in the US where a great athlete (or other high-profile and politically-minded individual) can impact the society far beyond their respected professions if they so choose.

    Amare&Melo are coming back so playing with them is the next challenge. If they do well and win together, Linsanity would be Nomo-mania level (maybe it’s already greater than that thx to the internet) by the season ends. And i’m sure most of us would be more than happy to see that.

  • polygonwindows

    @grgeblck

    i think you’re on the right track. Although, it’s a bit more complicated than that. But what you are saying is the one answer that makes the most sense out there in the world.

    @ktokyo

    not sure what jeremy or his folks political affiliations are, but i don’t mind seeing him wearing say Peak or Anta. You can only do sports for a living for so long so you gotta make the most while you are relevant.

    @Teddy-the-bear

    yes there is a Taiwan national basketball team. Ain’t good enough to make it out of Asia though.

    and to clear the air on that language thingy, Mandarin Chinese is the most popular language here and Taiwanese the language is called so b/c it’s widely spoken here too. Linguistically it’s filed under the giant umbrella of Chinese (the language), much like all the different dialects used in the rest of China. Taiwanese the language identical to Fujianese but it can sound really really different (the you-can-understand-what-it-is-yet-knowing-it’s-different) depends on who you run into. Didn’t find out about that until lots of trips to China and HK in recent years. For a long time i thought they’re identical…

  • http://averysmith.org Avery Smith

    @grghrk actually, their RACE is human. Their ethnic origin is Chinese.

  • http://hoopistani.blogspot.com hoopistani

    Obviously, Li Ning needs to sign Lin

  • http://slamonline.com. datkid

    he has to do this.

  • http://obsessioncollection.wordpress.com grgeblck

    well said @polygonwindows

  • http://obsessioncollection.wordpress.com grgeblck

    @averysmith, use a dictionary if you have one. you just sound like what i have just posted in the 1st comment of mine. ;)

  • Justin G.

    @Chief…How could he possibly have a tough time vs. Toronto? I know their defense has improved 1000% under Dwayne Casey but it’s still going to be Jose Calderon in front of him, quite possibly the worst defensive PG in the league. It’s also not like they have any shot blockers that can rotate and disrupt him either. I think there’s potential for another big game for Lin

  • http://www.fiba.com Darksaber

    Taiwan has a national team and i saw a few young taiwanese center/PF prospects at basketball without borders S’pore 2 summers ago. Tall talented guys, the national team isnt among the better Asia-Pacific teams though, unlike AUS, NZA, PRC.

  • http://obsessioncollection.wordpress.com grgeblck

    just to add in, Taiwan has their own basketball league, call SBL (Super Basketball League), there was once a player from Taiwan who went to Sac. Kings summer camp, unfortunately he wasn’t good enough, but he was one of the best players in Taiwan.

  • Kobester

    I read it in the news the other day, JLin is actually 1/4 Korean…….

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85Bl3GRdULQ&feature=youtube_gdata_player 1982

    @Teddy Taiwan does have a national basketball team, the reason you’ve never seen them is because they’ve never beaten China in qualifiers. Someone already pointed out that Taiwanese is a language completely different from Mandarin Chinese. There’s also other dialects specific to Taiwan. And saying the Taiwanese have no problem bring identified with Mainland Chinese is like saying Anericans have no problem being identified as British since that’s where they came from. If you know Taiwanese people who don’t mind being called Mainland Chinese, that’s fine. But there’s a reason Taiwan is called ROC, I suggest you Wikipedia it before assuming it means they’re the same just because they both have the word “China” in them. That whole 50/50 thing you’re talking about is completely made up – I went to high school in Taiwan, and I just came back from Taiwan last week to visit family. The last president in Taiwan was the last politician to run on a ticket that encouraged better China relations (who’s now in jail with a life sentence for embezelment), and even he didn’t want to give Taiwan to China. I’m sure you can find people who support Taiwan being handed over, and that’s fine, but 50/50? I had dinner with My mothers coworkers before I left, and they’re exact words to me were, “When you’re voting in the US, vote for a president that encourages Taiwan independence.” I’ll go ahead and forget that they don’t sound like they follow American politics, but I’m not here to argue pro Taiwan, I’m just saying you’re assuming a whole lot in your post without actually having any background information. You’re 50/50 ratio, if I were to guess, is closer to 90/10.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85Bl3GRdULQ&feature=youtube_gdata_player 1982

    @PolygonWindows I heard about them getting rid of the mandatory service policy, but I was told last week that there wasn’t a timeline, I never bothered to check. But even if it’s 4 months of basic training after 2014 (even now, plenty of people are getting out after less than a year of desk work for the military) the reason athletes and sports pros are skipping town is because 4 months to a year of time away from any sport is costly no matter what. You’d miss tourneys, you’d miss practice, and if it’s the off season you’d miss rest time. I’m sure Taiwan is chomping at the bit to get someone with Lin’s popularity to suit up, I’m just not so sure that he’d want to play if he’s required to do something as little as 4 months of boot camp.and for the record, there’s a good amount of Taiwanese parents have their kids out of the country for the sole purpose of skipping out on mandatory military service. There aren’t “benefits” like in the US for serving like the GI Bill, you’re just gone for 1-2 years for very low pay and then you’re home. To some, that’s a good enough reason to give up Taiwan citizenship.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85Bl3GRdULQ&feature=youtube_gdata_player 1982

    *If anyone comes back to this feed, my bad, I’ll stop with the bad pseudo history lessons.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    Alright, thanks for the info 1982.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    Isn’t Taiwan called the ROC because for years after the Chinese civil war the Kuomintang represented China, from Taiwan, in the United Nations Security Council? I thought most people who migrated to Taiwan after the civil war considered themselves mainland Chinese, while those who had been in Taiwan for many generations before that (ie. under Dutch and Japanese occupation) didn’t feel so close to mainland. Then there are the native indigenous islanders who were displaced and treated poorly the way most indigenous people are in the world.
    Correct me if I’m wrong? I’ve never been to Taiwan (only mainland) so you’re right, I don’t know what the general opinion is.

  • biffer

    Jeremy claims he’s proud to be Chinese;

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXOOsZ9q9Rc

  • http://slamonline.com 1982

    After the Chinese Civil War, the losing party escaped to Taiwan, taking with them the Republic of China title. In China today, the ruling party is PRC, a competely separate governing body, and which remains Communist. In Taiwan, while the ROC title is still entact in history books, the ruling party is KMT, which is Democratic in nature. Probably the easiest comparison, though not the most accurate, is Britain and the United States. The US was supposed to be an English Settlement, that obviously came to a stop and everyone here declared independence and went to war for it. The difference with Taiwan and China, and please keep in mind that this is heavily abridged, is that China has never come out and said Taiwan is no longer a part of China, and Taiwan has claimed independence for quite some time. Taiwan operates independently, has their own money, languages/dialects, government, and GDP. It’s a small island, thats for sure, but its people, and I use that only because I’m speaking of the majority, considers itself Taiwanese. I’m sure the common Taiwanese or Mainland person couldn’t care less about who owns what as long as their way of life isn’t disrupted. But as far as politics and national pride go, they’re very distint. Lots of lives were lost during the civil war, and lots of survivors and their descendents (that I’ve met and had long conversations with) hold quite a large grudge with the Mainland. It’s not as openly easy to understand, especially if you’ve never been there, but even if a person agrees to being Taiwanese or Chinese, I’ll bet you they’ll clear up their answer right quick if you ask them where they’re from. I’ll say I’m Chinese in a heartbeat, because that’s what I am in the general sense. But if you asked if I was Mainland Chinese, I’d clarify that I have nothing to do with that country. You can tell where a person’s from just by listening to them speak Mandarin Chinese, just like how you can tell an American from a British person. But just because they speak the same language (technically), it doesn’t mean they have no problem being confused for the other. The indigenous people were treated extremely harshly, just like the American Indians. But I don’t know why you brought them up, since if you’re speaking about Americans, you wouldn’t say, “You know Americans, and by American’s I mean American Indians…” The people who immigrated from China to Taiwan after the civil war are just that, people who immigrated from China. They’re not Taiwanese, and I wouldn’t expect them to consider themselves so. Just like how 1st generation immigrants to American often don’t consider themselves American. I’m Chinese-American, but that’s because that’s the only option on most forms. Actually, I’m American, because I don’t have citizenship anywhere else and I need a visa to go to Taiwan. But if you pulled one of those “no seriously, what are you?” types of questions that most Americans like to ask, the answer is Taiwanese-American. The average person can’t tell the difference, but that doesn’t change anything.

  • polygonwindows

    @1982

    wowa, didn’t know ur on the exact same boat as me. No taiwanese citizenship for me either and i do need visa to ”come home” (parents and family all here, but I was born in the U.S. And i’m currently based here and going nowhere anytime soon…

    @Teddy-the-bear

    1982 basically nailed it right there. It’s no way 50/50 though. Not sure if i can quantify things like that but it’s for sure not half/half. And you know it’s complicated when the topic gets grown men talking about Taiwanese history and politics, on a hoop site, on Valentine’s day (y’all need some good beer to go with all that history, and/or something better to do with all the time.) ha. You’re very welcome to come to Taiwan. It’s nice out here. I’d also second the Taiwanese-American identity b/c that’s exactly what i am, and it happens to be politically correct too so that’s nice. I remember back in my high school days in good ol’ Tennssee i did refer myself as chinese when asked about the ”what are you” question. Wish i knew better back then…

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