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Wednesday, April 18th, 2012 at 12:45 pm  |  115 responses

Jeremy Lin Is One of Time Mag’s ’100 Most Influential People in the World’


Jeremy Lin may not suit up again this season, but the Linsanity phenomenon continues to live on. Here’s how the venerable Time Magazine justified placing him on their annual list of the most influential people on the planet (the piece was written by Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education. For what it’s worth, Lin wrote the entry for fellow jock Tim Tebow): “Jeremy Lin’s story is a great lesson for kids everywhere because it debunks and defangs so many of the prejudices and stereotypes that unfairly hold children back. He’s dispelled the idea that Asian-American guards somehow couldn’t hack it in the NBA — and that being a world-class athlete on the court is somehow at odds with being an excellent student off the court. Contrary to what you might read, Jeremy, 23, is no overnight sensation. In fact, he achieved success the old-fashioned way: he earned it. He worked hard and stayed humble. He lives the right way; he plays the right way. It’s great to see good values rewarded in professional sports because that’s not always the case. Often it’s the bling, the glam, the individual that gets celebrated — not the team and working together to advance a goal bigger than oneself. Jeremy cares only about one thing — winning. And I don’t care whether you are an Asian-American kid, white, black or Hispanic, Jeremy’s story tells you that if you show grit, discipline and integrity, you too can get an opportunity to overcome the odds.”

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  • Jono

    Def!

  • Yep

    lol nice

  • MUBWAR

    oooookay.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    BAHAHAHAHAHA

  • http://sfjklf.com Jukai

    This got a little bit more ridiculous as time went by.
    Starts off right.
    A bit hyperbolic in the middle but it’s fine.
    The ending was ridiculous.

  • jhook

    ^^^how is it ridiculous?

  • http://www.slamonline.com Red

    Cause it was annoying.

  • DruNyce

    SMH…

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    how isn’t it ridiculous.

  • http://slamonline.com 1982

    He earned his playing time, he earned his youtube highlight reels, and he earned his place among quality young role players. Duncan – a Harvard alum as well – doesn’t mention any of that, and instead just wrote about him like he was Final’s MVP. That’s why it’s “ridiculous.”

  • http://slamonline.com Slick Ric

    SMH……………

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    These list really annoy the t*ts clean off me full stop. But to say that Jeremy Lin Is one of the 100 most influential people In the world Is so ridiculous I can barely put Into words. I find It hard accepting a sports star, ANY sports really, as truly influential to a point of being acknowledged as one of the worlds 100 most so…..but JEREMY LIN? Are you kidding me? A solid role player (perhaps even a good one) who made a splash and will probably sell a lot of jerseys In Asia Is top 100 IN THE WORLD? Two words TIME: GET FU*KED. Jesus Christ.

  • RIGGS

    how isnt he influential? an american born asian kid from harvard makes it to the nba and struggles before making the starting lineup of a big market team. I have asian friends who didnt relate at all with yao ming but relate with jeremy a whole lot more (and went to a lot of knick games due to it), how the hell is that not influential?

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    ofcourse he has influence and more than a normal person. But he is not one of the 100 most influential people on planet earth. That is absurd and stupid.

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    Exactly Nbk.

  • Toner

    The sub-heading in the article said “This year’s most influential” – like it or not, he made headlines this year and made Linsanity a buzzword for 2012. Granted, it’s only April, but he’s definitely left his mark on the year.

    He’s changed the perception that people have of the NBA, especially in Asian countries: Just because you’re Asian, you don’t have to be 7’6″ to play in the NBA. He seems to be a ‘normal’ Asian kid and he gives all Asian basketball players hope that, one day, THEY may make it to the L. That, to me, is influential. Is there another 100 people in the world that inspires, not just a country, but a race of people that Asians can mix it up with the best of them? I can’t think of one.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85Bl3GRdULQ&feature=youtube_gdata_player 1982

    You know who else made headlines this year? Snookie. Now tons of chubby chicks with no talent and big hair think they can get pregnant and make headlines. Is she on the list?

  • ThatShtCray

    Paul H – you are an idiot and a hater.

  • ThatShtCray

    1982 – You compare jersey shore to basketball. Really? All you read in Toner’s comment was “headlines”. Here I did the reading for you: “He’s changed the perception that people have of the NBA, especially in Asian countries: Just because you’re Asian, you don’t have to be 7’6″ to play in the NBA. He seems to be a ‘normal’ Asian kid and he gives all Asian basketball players hope that, one day, THEY may make it to the L. That, to me, is influential. Is there another 100 people in the world that inspires, not just a country, but a race of people that Asians can mix it up with the best of them? I can’t think of one.”

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    He is not a normal asian kid. Unless you fully believe the stereotype that all asians are extremely smart and hard working. Plus, it’s the 100 most influential people, not the 100 most inspiring to asians.

  • Iggi

    100 most influantial people! Really? Who the heck did he influence? Asian maybe.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85Bl3GRdULQ&feature=youtube_gdata_player 1982

    ThatShtCray – are you comparing basketball to global politics? The current war in the Miiddle East? Did You and Toner just make up how inspirational he is to Asian countries or did you actually talk to people in Asian countries and they told you that Jeremy Lin represented hope for them? My mom, who lives in Asia, loves Jeremy Lin. But he is not influential to her. My friends in Asia who play basketball are split on him – some think he’s the best thing since sliced bread. And some don’t like saying his name in the same breath as other starting NBA points. With that said – he does not influence either side at all. They’re fans of his, and they are not influenced by him to either go to Harvard, play more basketball, or believe in Jesus as their savior. What Asian influence are you referring to, by the way?

  • Trilla

    If you think Jeremy Lin is one of the most 100 influential people in the world you’re a complete moron, idiot, dumba**, and just overall stupid. Man I cant even believe people actually consider this dude influential at all, who gives a damn if hes an asian. At the end of the day hes an average player in the NBA that had a good stretch of games and got some hype, big whoop. I can name at least 1 million people more influential than him, my a** is more influential than him.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85Bl3GRdULQ&feature=youtube_gdata_player 1982

    And furthermore, you’re suggesting that before he came into the spotlight, Asians walked around with they heads down and hands in their shorts’ pockets when the “best of them” were on the court, waiting until the real ballers finished playing so we could shoot some baskets before they came back. GTFO witht that. I’ve never felt inferior on a basketball court, and neither have any of my Asian friends. Either you play basketball or you don’t. No one cares about race after someone yells “ball in.”

  • Toner

    @nbk: Fair enough that he’s not deemed a ‘normal’ asian kid because he works hard and is extremely smart, but you have to acknowledge that he has shattered the previous perceptions that “To be a success story in the NBA as an Asian, you need to be 6′ 10″, 7′ or above (Yao Ming, Wang Zhi Zhi, Yi Ji Lian)” – he is 6′ 3″, went to a ‘normal’ high school, went to college and wasn’t bred/trained by the Chinese government to solely play basketball, as Yao Ming/Wang Zhi Zhi/Yi Ji lian were. I do, however, disagree with you comment about “it’s 100 most influential people, not 100 most inspiring to asians” Last I checked, Asians are people too? Pretty sure he influenced Asians, which in term makes him influential, regardless of which race he influences. Also, race aside, isn’t his openness about his Christian faith influential to people too?

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Who is he influencing? Basketball is already extremely popular in Asia….he’s also been in the US his whole life and is an American citizen. He is easy to relate too. He may even inspire some people. But he is barely influencing anyone. And he’s definitely not one of the 100 most influential people on planet earth. If he moved to China, got citizen-ship, starred on their national team then maybe he’d be one of the 100 most influential people in China, maybe. To even say he is in the top 100 is to say that American Basketball is far and away more influential then most governments. You understand that right? And again, who is he influencing? Are we even really talking about influence or are you thinking about popularity? He maybe one of the 100 most popular people in 2012, infact he probably is. But that’s different.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85Bl3GRdULQ&feature=youtube_gdata_player 1982

    Toner – you’re still ignoring the fact that Inspiration and Influence are two different words.

  • http://www.offthebackboard.wordpress.com Off The Backboard

    Just because TIME says it, does not mean that it is true. Lin has been influential in doing what, exactly? Influencing more Asians to play basketball? Asia was already boasted as being of one of the strongest basketball-following continents in the world, prior to his arrival. Influential because of his adherence to religion? Please. Lin, as good as a basketball player as he’s been, was influential to the casual sports fan for about a week. In that span, the casual fan watched maybe 2 of his games, posted something about him on FB and Twitter 3 times, and then forgot about him after Melo returned. You think these same people that were “influenced” by him are going to change their lives in any way? Did it effect their life in any way aside from boasting about an Asian player? This list contains KRISTEN WIIG for Christ’s sake. She is on the list cause she made bridesmaid; are you questioning its integrity yet? A list like this should account only for those who truly make a difference in influencing the world, I’m talking scientists, businessmen, research teams, heroic cops/firefighters, etc. That’s inspiration. Instead, we get a list promoting the cultural phenomenon of certain individuals on AMERICA. You think anyone gives a flying f***K or knows about Kristen Wiig outside of North America, or the Western world?

  • http://www.offthebackboard.wordpress.com Off The Backboard

    @nbk – Beat me to the argument. Good to see we finally agree on something.

  • http://www.offthebackboard.wordpress.com Off The Backboard

    To hammer home my point – I have an Asian friend who does not follow sports much. He found out about Lin, posted about him on Facebook a couple of times, talked about how he was cheering for “the team Lin plays for” to win, etc. That lasted for about 1 week. By the second week? He’d already moved on to Kony, or whatever the latest viral hit was at the time. Lin was not influential, he was a fad (not as a player, but I mean as a media story) that the media loved to push narratives with. Were these narratives influential in riling up casual fans? Sure. But what long lasting impact did he really have?

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    @ThatShtCray, that Is an interesting and compelling argument you made against my statement. I can assure you I am neither an idiot, nor a “hater” (In Itself the most hateful, meaningless and uselessly thrown around term In American sports. The title Of Time’s list was the 100 most influential people on the planet. You have to both a complete moron and completely unaware of life outside of the states (and sports) to believe that. Time put him on this list because he was a great story In the year and will no doubt be marketed quite well. You actually think that because a guy inspires a few people to pick up a ball THAT he Is truly Influential? I mean TIM TEBOW Is on the list and he represents a sport that Isn’t even really played (at least In any meaningful sense) outside of the States. It’s a stupid List to make, at least In the way they seem to quantify Influence, and he Is an even worse inclusion on It.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    Dammit OTB. I’m not a co-signer, but you just won’t shut up!
    Co-sign OTB

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    I second that Co-sign Lakeshow.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    I triple stamp your double stamp.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    You can’t triple stamp a double stamp you a-hole…

    no erasies

  • http://www.offthebackboard.wordpress.com Off The Backboard

    Thanks guys. And I co-sign everything Paul and nbk have said thus far. I think in this case, even TIME is confusing popularity IN THE STATES with influence across the PLANET. There’s a big difference.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    You can make the argument that Lin is not top 100 most influential people if, and ONLY if, you can actually name 100 people more influential than he this year. Which most people in North America probably can’t do. Including Time Magazine… since list itself is pretty stupid. If Tim Tebow makes it then why not Lin too? Lolz.

  • http://sfjklf.com Jukai

    My issue was less Lin making it on this list and more the whole “HE ONLY CARES ABOUT WINNING… HE DOESN’T CARE IF YOU’RE BLACK, WHITE, OR ASIAN, HE ONLY CARES IF YOU CAN WIN!”
    First off, I bet you Jeremy Lin goes for the money. Because he IS so damn smart.
    Second off, it sure was able the individual. Hell, the team was so centered around him, the Knicks were thinking of trading Melo. Individual my ass.
    The article is just ridiculous. Just say it like it is: “An asian can play basketball! And kick ass! That totally blows our preconceived concepts of racial boundaries in ways we totally didn’t see coming. So we’ll pretty much do anything Lin says, just because we’re just in freaking awe!”

  • http://sfjklf.com Jukai

    Teddy: WTF TEBOW MADE IT?!?!?!?!!?! Your argument made me hate Times’ list even more!!!!

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    To the people saying “He only influences Asians…” Well, there are about 3 million Chinese people in the US alone, and millions more Asians of different ethnicities. Influence can mean a lot of different things. For instance, he “influenced” people to watch the Knicks and pay an extra $25 in shipping and tariffs to buy his jersey shirt across the border. If he did that with millions of people–that’s still a lot of influence! lol.
    Let’s simmer the outrage a little.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    haha co-sign Jukai 6:43 tho. Also I really hate this part:
    “In fact, he achieved success the old-fashioned way: he earned it. He worked hard and stayed humble. He lives the right way; he plays the right way. It’s great to see good values rewarded in professional sports because that’s not always the case. Often it’s the bling, the glam, the individual that gets celebrated — not the team and working together to advance a goal bigger than oneself.”
    Some truly corny sh!t right there. Also implies the hundreds of other players in the league didn’t work hard for their success. Stupid.

  • BuzzerBeater

    He made me go a month of lacking sleep because of watching his highlights and news all night, I admit. He’s influential alright.

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    Teddy your 6:40 comment is pretty much spot on. I just take influential as a literal term. Which, assuming that, is bullsh*t. Every name I have read so far (Lin, Tebow, Wiig) are about as influential as Henry Abbot. Considering they are entertainers and he is trying to actually influence people. Is he on the list?

  • http://www.nba.com Red

    Highlights? What highlights? You guys are seriously puppets.

  • http://www.kb24.com The Seed

    I can see Tebow on the list because he has a major stance on views, but Lin should not be on any list. Lets keep it real, dude is an OK player, but Flip Murray actually did the same thing. Media hyped up Lin, acting like he ball and shotcaller. Its a reason dude was cut from two teams, I always felt Knicks should have traded him for a draft pick or veteran player. Lin is a an OK player, that only has one hand dribble and his turnovers during the Knicks run was just plain stupid. BOOK IT!!

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    Oh look, it’s the renegade Red, here to show us how much of an individualist he (she?) is. You’re so unique! You think so independently–I mean, you were the ONLY one who didn’t get caught up in that Linsanity hype! Congratulations, Morpheus. What a critical thinker!!!!!

  • http://www.nba.com Red

    Thanks kid. Because saying people are puppets=saying I’m different. Yeah I was the only one, many call me Marvin Gaye, ahead of my time. No joke, I was born with the blood of African Kings & Queens.

  • http://www.google.com/news BETCATS

    I like Lin’s story, but the NBA is full of guys who put in work to get a roster spot. He still hasnt had a full season of being productive. This is just ridiculous.

  • Heals

    Loving the conviction and factuality with which a certain group is trying to counteract this false narrative on here…

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    Heals can you clarify what you mean? I don’t follow.

  • http://www.nba.com Red

    Heals, he wants u to clarify because he’s insecure & can’t stand it if you were insulting him, even if you meant to insult us both in duality, fragile egos break you see.

  • MikeC.

    There sure are an awful lot of comments here for someone who isn’t influential. Lin is polarizing to say the least. I think the sheer volume of press that Lin generated makes him influential.

  • MikeC.

    @ Trilla – a million more? Ok, go.

  • Lupe

    MikeC I saw a youtube video about a Baby laughing for 20 seconds. Had a few thousand comments. Boy was that baby influential.

  • http://Slamonline.com 1982

    Whoops – that last Lupe comment was me. Slam, stop showing people’s emails please.

  • Canesta

    This is almost as bad as Obama getting a Nobel prize…

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    Being the first Chinese-American player in the NBA is big, no matter how you look at it. If you don’t think sports is “influential” to culture in America, then okay. But if you agree with other athletes being on this list, then there’s absolutely no reason Jeremy Lin shouldn’t be there. End of story.
    Also he’s clearly a sensation in China too, and in the overall Chinese diaspora. Being that the Han Chinese race alone makes up 19% of the world’s population… Well… that’s not hard to argue.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    But now I’m just repeating what I said earlier. It’s freaking Time Magazine. Tim Tebow. Ya’ll gots ta chill.

  • MikeC.

    It’s Time Magazine’s list. If you don’t agree, make your own list.

  • Lin4President

    The issue seems to be what the definition of “influence” is:
    According to dictionary.com, its defined as:
    “the capacity or power of persons or things to be a compelling force on or produce effects on the actions, behavior, opinions, etc., of others”

    According to this definition, you can’t say that its ridiculous for Lin to be on this list. Of course there are always arguments to be made, but to say that there is absolutely no argument is wrong.

    First of all, its not about how good Jeremy Lin is as a player, or if he’s not the only one that worked hard to get in the NBA. But has he been a compelling force on people’s opinions and actions? I would have to say yes. He breaks stereotypes not only of asians, but for all people who face certain stereotypes, whether you a black, white, short, tall, fat etc. Secondly, there have clearly been big actions by a lot of people, because of Lin – Jersey sales, merchandise (which in turn affects a lot of industries) sponsorships, media; hell, the President even mentioned Lin.

    And yes he is a big deal for Asians, which last I checked almost makes up half the world’s population – so if you are highly influential for that demographic, then you must be up there. And don’t forget, we are just talking about the past 12 months.

    I agree with most of you though, that Time’s list is not exactly science, and really it should include scientists, etc. I would just like one of you to give another person who is so much more influential than Lin, that makes a strong enough of an argument that Lin should not be on the list.

  • Heals

    Seemed to me like Paul, nbk, OfftheBack and Lakeshow had some opinions they wanted out on this issue/concept of Lin’s impact/influence and finally got a perfect to spot to express it. Alotta of us think a certain way about the coverage/marketing of Lin and how that coverage/marketing has been handled by the media at large. Not the man, but the spectacle that came with him…

  • http://www.rich-imaging.com Dutch Rich

    His write-up was executed by the US Secretary of Education. They should poll 100 secretaries in local high schools and will probably come to the same conclusion. The rest of the list is interesting as well.

  • dev0

    … but not “Most Beautiful”?

  • http://www.slamonline.com phsyco B

    J lin was alright but clearly overhyped. He’ll be nothing but a solid pont guard for his career, never a top echelon guy. But his popularity, particularly with the asian community, is massive. He is very marketable but i don’t know how influenctial he is, unless a sh*&load of asians getting around in lin jerseys is somehow influectial.

  • pasa

    First, this is not a Top 100 Basketball Players list so it’s a waste of space to discuss his basketball skills. But by any measures, his start was unprecendented (highest scores in his first five games in NBA history). But his influence is far broader than basketball:

    - He broke the stereotypes about Asian being unathletic
    - He’s the first Asian American male who broke into the mainstream of American pop culture
    - He saved the floudering Knicks’ season
    - He attracts millions of non-basketball fans or basketball fans who have quit watching the NBA around the world back to the NBA and root for him as evidenced by soaring TV ratings, online streamings, sold-out stadiums everywhere he played
    - He moved the MSG stock price on the stock market
    - Time Warner and MSG settled a deal after months of impass because of public demand for Lin
    - Many Asian countries added the Knicks games (live in Taiwan) because of him
    - He moves merchandise
    - He has millions of following on the social media in both English and Chinese

    Is that enough to be called influential?

  • EJ

    If I remember correctly, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad didn’t make the list but Jeremy Lin, Tim Tebow and Chelsea Handler did. Cool.

  • BRYANT BYNUM GASOL 24 17 16

    What the hell did Lin have sex with time magazines editor

  • BRYANT BYNUM GASOL 24 17 16

    Slamadamonth Paul h on time magazine

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    Nobody said he wasn’t influential. I don’t think you are quite understanding of the magnitude of being considered 1 of the 100 most influential people out of 6 Billion…the i bet the majority of the world doesn’t even know who Jeremy Lin is or have even heard his name enough to be influenced by him.

  • http://www.nba.com Red

    But not the first Asian who did. Derrick Rose was the youngest MVP in history. He should be like mini-Oprah then no? In the end it was all hype for an ok player.

  • Pais

    Some of you are perhaps a little to passionate in defending your argument. This is definitely worthy of debate. I’m undecided as to whether it’s deserving but it’s near impossible to say as to whether or not it’s justified. Personally, my initial reaction was GTFOH but after a little thought I’m forced to at least scale that back a bit. Undoubtedly I would like to think it’s true, the idea that many people are in fact influenced in a positive way for the reasons laid out, I don’t think anyone can disagree it would be nice. The idea that many would consider that academics don’t need to be sacrificed for other goals (whether or not it’s sports). The idea that many would be led to believe that their race doesn’t have to be a barrier to realizing their dreams (whether or not it’s the NBA). Or the idea that many would understand that setbacks don’t necessarily amount to failure. But of course it’s near impossible to gage how many people are/were influenced positively in this manner, is it enough to justifiably be considered “top 100 influential people”? I’ve got no idea really, but the story was huge and truly went global. Is easy to imagine that many of the millions of asian kids that already love the sport may have been inspired. I imagine many others also found aspects of Lin’s story quite inspirational.

  • Pais

    Most commentators here like myself are first and foremost basketball fans, and from that stand point Lin’s story was and continues to be insanely overhyped. He’s good, he surprised us, he’s proved he has potential but he is not amongst the elite as of yet (long way to go really). But don’t let fact that some irrational, casual basketball enthusiast have elevated him to one of the games greatest bias you too much. Strictly in terms of him deserving this particular accolade, it’s possible that he does. It be great for all of us if that is the case.

  • PackU

    It’s obvious by reading the posts here Slam online has a lower rung of readership; GED, maybe a little JC. Most here won’t have enough vocab to go through a page of TIME. LOL. Gotta get the f*(k outta here before my brain shrinks.

  • Pais

    Do Novak or Messi, deserve to be on the list? Or any athlete for that matter? Regarding the integrity of the magazine, well it’s a magazine. In the end it counts for little more than perhaps stimulating debate such as this one. It’s not the be all and end all of anything. Popularity, inspiration and influence is closely tied. Popular people often inspire others and thereby exert a degree of influence, some of you get hung up on semantics (purposely) in an effort to WIN. Perhaps better to entertain other opinions and perhaps when appropriate adjust your own accordingly (warning: it can lead to intellectual growth).

  • pasa

    Here is Time magazine’s own blog explaining why they select athletes at all:
    http://keepingscore.blogs.time.com/2012/04/18/good-sports-six-athletes-named-to-the-time-100/

    BTW, Jeremy Lin’s story was reported around the world. Most of the Asia (not just China) is either aware of him or enthusiatically follows him because he’s the only Asian star in the NBA and basketball is hugely popular in Asia. nbk, as you may have known, Asia is the most populated continent in the world. I also read online comments posted by Lin fans from UK, Denmark, Finland, New Zealand, UAE, Brazil etc. You’re way underestimating his fame and influence.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    Red, do you think Derrick Rose is Asian?

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    wait nvm… sounded like you did. “not the first asian tho.” ignore that.
    @ EJ: What other presidents made it? I’m not gonna read the list myself, lol.

  • EJ

    If this was a serious list, it wouldn’t have any entertainers. The only way they can influence us, is by inspiring us. A serious list would have people of professions that affect our daily lives, like politicians and scientists. You can’t make an argument on why Jeremy Lin is on the list, other than this list is BS.
    @Teddy: Obama, Ron Paul and Romney made it, also presidents of Nigeria, Myanmar, Colombia, Brazil, Syria and Kim Jong Un made it.

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    It’s not the 100 most popular people of 2012. Idk how y’all are mixing up a popular story with being in the upper 99.99% of influential people on earth as an athlete Who was popular for about a month. The list served its purpose though, it got people talking and likely attracted readers so….

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Paul H
    Muhammad Ali was probably that influential. Jordan too at his apex. Magic and Bird maybe.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Yeah, y’all must not have gotten the memo about how when certain folks say “The World” they really mean, “The World White Americans Care About.”
    Sorry about that, we’ll add you to our listserv.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    And lastly, the piece clearly traded on the obvious stereotypes that most athletes just hit the genetic lottery.
    They don’t work or play hard, they just got lucky.
    Since the VAST MAJORITY of the sports watching public believes this true, despite being slapped in the face with how inadequate they and almost everyone they know is at sports on a regular basis, it’s not that surprising that the U.S. Secretary of Education also believe it.
    People don’t respect what it takes to be an elite athlete. The combination of talent, hard work and intelligence is not respected, particularly not when you discuss majority-black sports.
    Period.

  • EJ

    @pasa: The president of China wasn’t on the list! Maybe he has more influence on the people of China and the world than Jeremy Lin. I’d say every country’s president and prime minister (and probably a whole lot of other people) is more influential than any athlete.
    And I don’t mean influence by inspiring and touching people, but influence by affecting people’s everyday life directly. Jeremy Lin or Tim Tebow has no influence on that.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    I don’t agree that the list should just be politicians and scientists–that doesn’t make any sense. Culture, pop culture, whatever you want to call it (including sports), actually does influence your life whether you accept it or not. We’ll have to define what a pure “entertainer” is because a great musician, for example, IS influential.
    Co-sign Allenp–Muhammad Ali definitely. I’d also put Joe Lewis and Jackie Robinson on the list of influential athletes. I’m willing to bet Yao Ming probably made a Time 100 list too.

  • Geoff

    Popular athletes have influence over consumers so it’s always apporpriate that they appear on such a list. Jersey sales, shoe sale, ticket sales, tv ratings can all be linked to an athlete depending on the sport. That contributes to the economies of multiple nations, in mulptiple areas of business. Agriculture, manufacturing, advertising are just some of the sectors that get influenced by an athllete’s popularity. Lin made a lot of people a lot of money during his run. His future and past have nothing to do with why he is on the list, nor do his potential or future production. There is a reason he got pay raises this year, and it’s because of what his popularity translated into money-wise. You don’t have to be a Harvard MBA to figure it out.

  • Geoff

    I do agree that the write is just plain idiotic.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    You guys who are sports fans, who frequent SLAMonline every day to talk about basketball, who rarely (if ever) go a day without watching basketball, are not going to convince me that basketball doesn’t have an “influence” on your life. I can safely say that Jeremy Lin has influenced me, as a Chinese Knick fan, more than Mitt Romney, whose only influence on me has been to tune out the Republican nominations entirely. I can also safely say that Lin has influenced more people than some of the other entertainers on that list, like Clare Danes and Rihanna. And I can also safely say that Rihanna has influenced more people than at least Mitt Romney. So it’s not black and white, and being a snake-faced politician a la Mitt Romney does not necessarily mean you have influence, especially when your position has not yet been won.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    @ Geoff: That’s a good point..

  • EJ

    I don’t think entertainers belong in the top 100. There’s a lot of countries in the world, and maybe you don’t know anything about the politics of Belarus or whatever country, but their politicians have a huge impact on the lives of their countrymen. They can raise taxes, make laws and even declare wars, so I think there’s definitely 100 politicians in the world who influence people’s lives more than any entertainer.
    And maybe scientists aren’t famous, but they can improve and influence lives a whole lot more than entertainers/athletes.
    But a list like that would be pretty boring tho.

  • Geoff

    *write-up. @Teddy: Thanks

  • EJ

    Maybe I like influence to be more concrete than others, IDK. Who cares?

  • Geoff

    @ EJ: Entertainers/Athletes drive multibillion dollar businesses in multiple nations around the globe. If your list consisted strictly of those with political and scientific influence then I’d see your point. But you can’t get more concrete than economics. Like it or not, they influence how people spend money, thus influencing labor and trade. That’s how the world works. They don’t get paid millions because they’re geniuses; they get paid because they influence how we spend money.

  • EJ

    @Geoff: Of course if I made a list it would have economists and so. But athletes aren’t big enough. Only basketball related person who could have a chance of cracking the top 100 is Mikhail Prokhorov.
    I didn’t say the list should have only scientists and politicians, I just used them as an example. But athletes and entertainers don’t make it in my opinion.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    @ EJ: Nah it wouldn’t be boring at all. A list of the top 100 most influential scientists would be great. I don’t agree with Geoff that influence is all about how we spend our money–but I also don’t agree with what you’re saying. If a musician really inspires you, how is that not more influential than a politician who raises your tax rate?
    Also with respect to science–I love it. It’s real. But for example, the last Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to the man who discovered quasi-crystals. It turns out some crystal lattices aren’t ordered the way we once thought they were. Cool… But can you really make the argument that THAT particular discovery, which was Nobel Prize-worthy, has had more influence on people’s lives than every musician in the world ever?

  • EJ

    ^No I can’t. However, it’s hard to rank how influential entertainers are, especially if they’re still active, cause the way they can influence people on a top 100 worthy level is indirect. A politician or scientist can influence lives more concretely.
    An entertainer of the past is easier to rank, cause then you know if they sparked a new era in their industry, and they weren’t just popular for a while. Who knows, maybe discovering quasi-crystals will turn out to be big lol.

  • http://thetroyblog.com Teddy-the-Bear

    lol maybe it is big already, I don’t know.
    Is a politician’s influence really all that direct? Of course what Obama does has a lot impact on the world but America’s influence would be what it is regardless of whether or not Obama was elected. It’s not that black and white, imo.
    The only REAL problem with having an athlete or entertainer, like an actor or musician, on the list is that it assumes the entire world cares about America’s celebrities… So making a list of the most influential people in the *world* is hard, and basically means “in white America” like Allen said. But that’s the only problem I see.

  • EJ

    The problem I have with an athlete/entertainer on the list is, when a politician raises taxes for example, you pay more taxes. When a musician makes a song, some people might be touched/inspired by it, and most don’t care at all. So you basically have to have an interest towards an entertainer to be influenced by what they do.

  • Geoff

    @EJ: Athletes aren’t big enough? I’m not sure you fully understand the concept. Athletic companies make billions off of basketball by itself, not including other sports. Michael Jordan and Allen Iverson alone have taken sneaker brands to the billion dollar mark by creating a demand for one type of sports shoes. Do you understand how much money Nike and Reebok made/makes off of them and other athletes? They don’t get paid millions just for the sake of it. Do you understand the demand for cheap labor to produce shoes and apparel has influenced trade agreements with other nations? Who do you think is manufacturing shoes that people want strictly because these guy’s names are attatched to them? Who do you think is supplying cotton, leather, rubber, and synthetic materials to create the shoes? Farms and chemical companies supply the materials to manufacture the apparel. Shipping companies also get a piece of the pie. The shoes don’t fly into stores themselves. How is billions of dollars in commerce not big enough? What’s big enough, trillions? If that’s your standard then I can see how it isn’t “big enough”. International trade isn’t big enough? Jeremy Lin probably sold more jerseys in China in a month that most other players have in their careers. That’s pretty influencial when you consider the economics behind it. Tim Tebow’s trade to the Jets triggered a legal battle between Reebok, a sub-unit of multination corporation adidas, and Nike. That’s pretty influential. Lin managed to raise profits for a mulitibillion dollar company when Dolan and co raised ticket prices during his run. I mean, I can go on and on forever. The influence of athletes over business is undeniable. It’s not even a debate really. Slam wouldn’t even have a site for us to have this conversation. Or a mag for that matter. These writers wouldn’t even have jobs in sports if you get my drift. Any group of people that can affect that amount of jobs should be represented on this type of list.

  • Geoff

    EJ: The people who make the products that athletes endorse rarely even know who they are. Yet that athlete has an influence over how they are able to feed their families. Think about that.

  • Geoff

    One last thing, to show you how much athletes can influence look no further than so-called free trade. Jordan and other athletes who helped propel Nike into the powerhouse it is allowed it to gain enough clout to lobby for advantageous agreements with the poor nations that produce their products. At the height of the Jordan craze in the 90′s, demand for sweatshop work was pretty high. Sure Nike and other U.S companies supported brutal, anti-worker dictators in Indonesia and other countries. But when you’ve got millions demanding a shoe solely because of some bald dude, you’ll see how quickly a company’s morality is becomes non-existant. Jordan’s influence reached quite far my friend. Make your own moral judgements about free trade, but don’t doubt that athletes are apart of it.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Please god tell me you are not comparing Michael Jordan’s influence on the world to Jeremy Lin’s. When you have to type Michael Jordan’s name to make a point about Jeremy Lin’s influence you should just realize as soon as or before you finish typing J.o.r.d.a.n. that your point is dead in the water.

  • Geoff

    Nbk not sure if you have reading comprehension problems but I made no comparisons between athletes. My point was that it’s absurd to say atheletes don’t belong on such a list. I used individual athletes as examples, not comparisons against each other. It’s not rocket science.

  • Geoff

    If you had problems understanding that then maybe you should only focus on basketball stats.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Did I say I read what you wrote? I saw Michael Jordan’s name so I said “Please god tell me you are not comparing Michael Jordan’s influence on the world to Jeremy Lin’s.” I never disputed what you said. It was just a general comment. Maybe reading comprehension is where you have issues? Or maybe you are a little sensitive? As I said numerous times above, ofcourse Jeremy Lin has influence, just like any athlete or person who is talked about in the media. He just doesn’t have more influence then everyone in the world but 99 others.

  • Geoff

    Responding to anything anyone writes in implying that you indeed read it. Nice try though. And if you didn’t then it makes you look pretty dumb for commenting on whatever you allegedly didn’t read. Why would I be sensitive? I’m not the one who responded to what I “didn’t read” lol. (As if that even makes sense lmao)

  • Geoff

    * is implying

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    No commenting is implying I’m commenting. By Typing. The rest is you assuming just because I typed something after you that I had to have read what you wrote. Which again, is just you assuming. And you being sensitive is you getting defensive (asking about my reading comprehension, telling me to stick to stats) about my response because you think I was somehow disputing your comment…when in reality, I was just saying exactly what I said.

  • Geoff

    You commented specifically about something I wrote. You didn’t comment generally about the article. The only person making assumptions is you, since you took one piece of what I wrote and assumed I was comparing Lin to Jordan. You saw the name, which you R-E-A-D, made a wrong assumption, and commented about it. The fact that you’re even going back and forth about it is asinine. You look silly right now lmao.

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    Like I said I saw Michael Jordan’s name and made a comment. What is hard to understand? Honestly you have to be pretty stupid if you are actually reading what I’m saying and seeing an assumption. I told you I based my comment off of seeing Michael Jordan’s name. If I cared to respond to you about what you said I would have. My comment would have your name in it Geoff, directing the comment at you. By saying “Please god tell me you are not comparing Michael Jordan’s influence on the world to Jeremy Lin’s.” I am clearly showing that I didn’t read your comment because that’s not what your comment was about. This is pretty simple logic and association. If i said “Geoff you can’t compare Jordan’s influence to Lin’s” (which I clearly didn’t do) then you could question my reading comprehension. But I didnt. I made a comment in a comment section about a subject, which so happens to be relative to the topic of your comment, but clearly if you can read, not disputing it. It’s not hard to see

  • Geoff

    Stop. Just stop. It’s getting worse and worse. Now you sound downright foolish. Did I say you disputed my comment? No. I questioned your reading comprehension because you posted a comment in response to a name I mentioned, except your comment had nothing to do with anything. Smart people don’t do that. When one responds to a comment it’s because they read it. If you didn’t read it was pointless to respond. Your comment was “Please god tell me your not comparing Jordan’s influence to Lin’s”. Why ask a dumb question like that when you could’ve read it yourself, unless you were seeking the type of response I gave you? Because you wanted the response I gave you. You then went on to give me advice about what would happen to how you would percieve the validity of my point if I was making the comparison. Like, who asked you for commenting advice? Don’t get mad because you made a pointless, useless comment unrelated to my post, and I let you know. Man up and get over it. You look ridiculous right now.

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    Actually I am not mad at all. And like you said, my comment was unrelated to your post, which we both know. So why are you getting sensitive? And this would be back to square 1. I just made a comment in a comment section, just like I told you in the first place “Did I say I read what you wrote? I saw Michael Jordan’s name so I said “Please god tell me you are not comparing Michael Jordan’s influence on the world to Jeremy Lin’s.” I never disputed what you said. It was just a general comment. Maybe reading comprehension is where you have issues? Or maybe you are a little sensitive? As I said numerous times above, ofcourse Jeremy Lin has influence, just like any athlete or person who is talked about in the media. He just doesn’t have more influence then everyone in the world but 99 others.” – why are you having trouble grasping that my comment wasn’t for you? You just made me think of something (me seeing Jordan’s name specifically) so I made a comment. It’s pretty simple unless of course you are mistaking me saying “please god” with “please Geoff”

  • Geoff

    You said “please God tell me you aren’t comparing Jordan’s influence to Lin’s”. I guess the “you” in your question was God. I guess you were literally asking God if God was comparing Jordan to Lin. Not. I referenced Jordan and you jumped to a dumb conclusion about what you thought I was saying about Jordan and Lin. If I hadn’t mentioned Jordan, you wouldn’t have written that stupid remark. Simple as that. You arguing about what happened is plain stupid.

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    Right you wrote Jordan and it reminded me of more than one conversation I’ve had lately. So I commented a thought I’ve had more than once lately. It’s pretty simple really. You just have to be able to understand some comments although similar to yours in content may not actually be directed at you. As horrible as that must be for you.

  • EJ

    I still don’t think they’re top 100 worthy. Nike is a big business, but if somebody who’s involved with Nike would make the top 100, that would probably be like Phil Knight. And ahead of these people JUST in the business world are the CEOs of companies like Apple, Walmart and McDonalds. So I don’t think athletes are top 100 worthy.

  • kidbreaker

    Lol so many arguments about how Lin shouldn’t be in the list.

    FAct of the matter is, if he wasn’t in this list, SlamOnline wouldn’t even be posting any articles on this matter for you to discuss. He’s the only NBA player chosen since 2006, and if Time magazine feels that he’s worthy enough to be on it, hey, it’s their magazine, their word goes. You can agree to disagree and make up your own list of influential people.

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