Quantcast
Friday, May 11th, 2012 at 5:26 pm  |  2 responses

Likely Lottery Pick Brad Beal Signs with Agent

by Tzvi Twersky | @ttwersky

A multitude of agents have spent the past month-plus trying to sign Brad Beal, a likely lottery pick in the upcoming 2012 NBA Draft. Ultimately, Beal has chosen to sign with Mark Bartelstein of Priority Sports & Entertainment, SLAM has learned.

Beal, a native of St. Louis, MO, decided in the wake of March Madness to forgo his final three years at the University of Florida to pursue an NBA career. In his one season there, the 6-3 guard became the first Gator ever named to both SEC All-Freshman and First-Team All-SEC. In 37 games at Florida, he averaged 14.8 ppg and 6.7 rpg. Known for his shooting prowess, Beal is a former McDonald’s All-American.

Priority Sports—which was originally founded by Bartelstein—boasts an extensive client list, including five other players in the 2012 Draft class.

  • Add a Comment
  • Share
  • RSS

Tags: , ,

  • cbb_fanatic

    I probably should have been the first responder since the first is obviously a hater (or the disgruntled fan of a team that went NOWHERE). But anyway, whatever team Beal plays on is going to be one of my favorite teams (I say one of because I’m a UK fan..lol). But Beal is one of the greatest SGs in this draft (with Jeremy Lamb and Will Barton). A lot of people are screaming for the Cavs to pick him up, but, if draftexpress.com is correct, the Cavs may load up with the Wildcats. But either way, they can’t lose. I’m definitely looking forward to Beal making an immediate impact in the league.

  • Dr. DL

    Damn, ZOGS. All you do on this site is hate. Lebron and Beal most recently. It’s pathetic. Beal, on the other hand, is the real deal. I think he has underrated ball handling and overall athletic skills due to his 3-point stroke being so dependable. People focus on that and scouting reports seem to reflect it by pigeonholing him as a spot-up shooter. But he has lots of different skills along with that J, making me think of a poor man’s Ray Allen.

Advertisement