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Saturday, February 8th, 2014 at 2:11 pm  |  71 responses

Adam Silver Wants To Raise NBA Age Minimum To 20

 

The NBA’s age minimum has been a topic of contention for a decade, and new commissioner Adam Silver has plans to bring the discussion to the fore once again. Silver has designs to raise the age minimum to 20 years old, primarily to allow players time to develop and minimize risk in the Draft. Per Scott Howard-Cooper of NBA.com

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  • underdog

    Thank you Shawn Marion!

  • The Seed

    This makes no sense, I can go die in the war at 18, become a tennis or golf pro as young as 14 if good enough or soccer pro, or baseball, I can be signed from High School, but the two major Black Sports, need their stars to stay in College for football for 2 years, and the NBA 1 year, but the age requirement could make someone have to go to school for 3 years, if you graduate High School at 17, like I did. The rule is borderline racist, he is trying to put in effect. NBA teams will still draft busts, no matter what, but for the last 20 years in the NBA, the best players have been from High School or have had international players who started to play professional young like Tony Parker. I don’t like Adam Silver already.

  • Matisse

    This is blatant collusion with the NCAA. College does not make better ball players. When will people realize that?

  • Feez_22

    I hate this and pretty much can predict where this is going.

    Soon after the nba passes this ridiculous ruling, they will pass another. They will most definitely require nba players to play in college for at least 3 years so they could be in line with the NFL. They will then go for the jugular and will try to abolish fully guaranteed contracts within the next 2 collective bargaining agreement negotiations.

    Maybe adam silver’s comments on the nba being as popular as the nfl go BEYOND the marketability and popularity of the game… Adam seems to be geared towards copying the nfl’s salary structure as well.

    This ruling would also rake in even more dollars for college basketball considering that they lose more than two thirds of their top flight stars to 1 and done these days. Nothing is more marketable than a repeat champion (which would have most likely been the case if UK’s 2012 freshman laiden championship team stayed another year).

    This is ludacris to me. This rule should be challenged if enforced.Take it to the highest level of the courts if need be. The nfl at least has an out for keeping players in school for 3 yrs. They may need that long to adjust to the physicality of the game. The nba game however is actually more of a FINESSE game than its college counterpart… I just don’t like this at all.

  • KipSmithers

    Honestly, have it where the pro team could draft a player right out of High School, but the pro team would have to pay for the player’s education(probably a minimum of two years), freeing up scholarships for players who are good enough for a scholarship, but not good enough to be drafted by a pro team directly out of High School.

  • brothasdontsurf

    On an unrelated topic, Legalize IT Commish!

  • brothasdontsurf

    On an unrelated topic, Legalize IT Commish!

  • brothasdontsurf

    On an unrelated topic, Legalize IT Commish!

  • Nathan James

    They want college basketball to stay competitive and raise reviews for college basketball even more. Its probably the ncaa trying to help themselves with the help of nba.

  • JJ Jones

    So I can go to Afghanistan at 18 but I can’t make money doing what I love at that same age? This makes NO sense. Colleges aren’t teaching players anything. What if said player gets injured before he can realize his nba dream then what?

  • JJ Jones

    At least in the nfl it makes sense due to your body not being mature enough at 18 compared to grown a** men who get paid to workout out and destroy everyone for a paycheck.

  • Kylan Holt

    To be real, that’s probably the smartest thing I have read in years regarding this issue…b/c cats like Austin Rivers robbed a kid (probably well-deserving too) of a scholarship to Duke knowing full-well he was only going for the one year…+1

  • KipSmithers

    Thanks!

    Now, doing that will get rid of some walk-on rolls, so the NCAA would need to change roster size limits as well.

  • KipSmithers

    Thanks!

    Now, doing that will get rid of some walk-on rolls, so the NCAA would need to change roster size limits as well.

  • KipSmithers

    Thanks!

    Now, doing that will get rid of some walk-on rolls, so the NCAA would need to change roster size limits as well.

  • Kylan Holt

    Why not change something worth changing?? like charges being removed from the game…or the constant traveling I see EVERYONE doing EVERY GAME

  • redbeard

    The army is a public institution and the NBA is private. Thus the NBA can do whatever it wants with age limits and restrictions without your opinion or mine. I don’t think the NBA was in a bad place when guys like Shaq and Hakeem did their years in college and then made the jump.

  • redbeard

    Fully guaranteed contracts allow chronically injured players to sit on the bench and collect money while ruining the financial health of teams. They have no incentive to work hard because they don’t have to worry about losing the job. Non-guaranteed contracts would allow teams to get rid of dead weight and not get stuck in low lottery territory for years at a time, giving fans the hope of change. At the same time, GMs should be more shrewd in their signings and not gamble on marginally productive injury-prone players like Andrew Bynum. As a Pistons fan, I’ve had to deal with Joe Dumars’ ineptitude for 6 years now.

  • Free

    Preach bruh, I never even thought about it from a racism stand point tbh but seriously the fact that you can go to war at 18 but potentially gotta wait til ur 20s to play in a league where in some cases you are good enough play in at 16 is ridiculous
    In cases where the main issue is money, if this goes thru I would really encourage players to just go overseas or if that’s too much of a change/culture shock play in the D-League cuz this all about stopping the “one and done” epidemic and helping out the NCAA

  • HOOPDREAMS

    They should change it where if you graduate when your 17 then you just have to wait till 19 but if you graduate when your 18 then you have to wait till your 20. I think having players in college for at least 2 years isnt a bad idea, there where ALOT of players that came out off highschool that were busts, instead of superstars like they where projected to be. Even when you think about theres about 2-4 all- stars in every draft and then the rest are role players, or just have specific good traits. People need to stop putting all these bullshit blogs sites and youtube videos (cough)ballislife, tryna hype up a 5 year old saying hes has the crossover of a allen iverson or has the shot of michael jordan, thats where it all starts because then the player is hyped to be a superstar but is overseas after there 4th year in the league. Prime example aquille carr he can barley play on a d-leauge team but was hyped to be the next iverson.

  • HOOPDREAMS

    It was Austin Rivers decision to stay at duke for 1 year, it was bad judgement on his part he should have known from the workouts with the teams he had in the summer that he wasnt ready, and his father is a nba coach, as a “coach” he should have given that “player” austin rivers advice and told him to stay a year longer, if he stayed at duke for at least 1 more year he would have the skills of a player like jamal crawford. being robbed is when somebody takes advantage of you because you have know idea of the situation, he knew what he was doing, he was going to the highest level of professional basketball and if he wasnt ready for it he would be on the bench and thats where he is

  • therichardkirby

    I like where Adam Silver’s motives are. He thinks the NBA should be on par with the NFL, and he is absolutely right. One of the biggest complaints about the NBA is that it is not competitive because teams do not have the financial flexibility that NFL teams have. One-and-done players who are clearly not ready disappear on mediocre to bad NBA teams.
    Additionally, this move to raise the age limit will give people an opportunity to get to know players as they perform in college, players who they will more than likely follow as they go to the league. It happens in football all the time. I know people that would watch different teams for example because they followed a player that played for their favorite school.

  • therichardkirby

    And Austin Rivers was clearly not NBA-ready when he left!

  • Matisse

    Let’s get this straight. If Austin Rivers stayed a eternity in college he still wouldn’t be a Jamel Crawford.

  • Matisse

    Yeah and the NBA is and was in a good shape when Lebron and Kobe left straight from high school. It should a players right when he wants to enter the league.

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    Yes. Let’s ignore the first-ballot hall of famers KG, Kobe, and Lebron, and let’s also ignore the All-NBAers TMAC, Amar’e, and JO, and let’s even ignore the solid pros like Montae Ellis and Amir Johnson because “ALOT of players that came out of high school were busts”.

    While we’re at it, let’s ignore that fact that Hasheet Thabeet, Adam Morrison, and Joel Alexander all spent at least 3 years playing college ball.

    My point is, college ball or no college ball, the draft is always a gamble. Several players struggle to excell at the college level but thrive in the NBA and vise versa. A player dominating at the university level should always be taken with a grain of salt. If you want proof of how little forcing players to attend 1 year of college actually helps in the scouting process, look no further than last year’s number 1 pick.

  • JJ Jones

    That still doesnt make it morally right. So I can go and die for others at 18 but I can’t provide for myself the way the I want to while being fully capable? Thats a double standard.

  • trillsap

    go to Europe or the D league if you love it so much

  • http://www.rich-imaging.com/ Dutch Rich

    Be careful when wishing for parity. You don’t want to end up in the wrong draft!

  • dabuddah420

    If your so talented at the age of 19 to play pro ball and your not allowed wouldnt it make sense to travel overseas get paid a bit then enter draft?

  • JJ Jones

    Exactly

  • JJ Jones

    U completely missed my point…

  • https://twitter.com/jasontichenor Mr. Wet

    To be fair, had hasheet thabeet not played college basketball. He wouldn’t be a millionaire in the NBA.

  • DJ_BobbyPeru

    Probably close to half of the allstars are high school or 1 year players. Maybe more. This is stupid.

  • Billy

    You can provide for yourself though. The Nba is not the only institution that you can “provide for yourself the way you want to”. You can easily go get a job at a Walmart or another business. If you want join the business of the Nba then you have to adhere to their particular standards or join another business.
    Colleges aren’t just about developing basketball skills, they are also about developing individuals. I’m not sure if you’ve actually been to college but colleges provide for an innumerable set of skills you learn that are unique to the experience. The Nba is making a statement that they want people coming into their organizations to be smarter, more independent and well-rounded rather than brainless jocks.
    You can complain all you want of the potential economic risk. Perhaps, they hurt themselves and no longer will play in the NBa. Thats why they have their college education as a backup to pursue something else equally financially advantageous.
    Furthermore, many athletes, including Nba players like Kenny Anderson, spend their entire salaries of over 60+ million dollars and end up bankrupting themselves in the process. What about this economic problem and risk? Isn’t this the same thing as them never going to the Nba? The possibility of bankruptcy is likely to be significantly higher if they don’t have a college education, especially in the college-less case as Kenny Anderson. Don’t you think so?

  • Patrick

    Its b.s. Its discrimination. I think it’s wrong. Age discrimination

  • Feez_22

    I’m a pistons fan too and trust me… having joe D at the helm is horrible as hell to me too.

    Having non-guaranteed or partially guaranteed contracts means that your gm can only do so much to destroy your team as it pertains to mid-level guys making bigger salaries. Maybe with non guaranteed deals the pistons could have gotten rid of charlie v and ben gordon easier and what not. Also, it would make for a more competitive league with more parity as teams will not be able to stack up in prime stars.

    However,, a problem that arose in the nfl due to non guaranteed deals was that they would spend all the money saved on the quarterback regardless of that qb’s relative talent to the rest of the league. Guys like cutler, stafford and even flacco (although he won a sb to justify) now get paid like they are top 5 guys when in reality they are average/mid tier. They literally get paid as much or more than guys like manning and brees (who are both top 5). Thus, nba teams would overpay 1 player (the star) and would pretty much handcuff themselves to that 1 dude instead of overpaying 3-4 guys which gets them stuck in cap hell.

    Now the question becomes this: What qualifies as a star? Notice how 3 of the guys i mentioned who get paid like top 5 nfl qb’s have 1 pro bowl and 0 all pro selections between them. They don’t play like stars yr in yr out yet get paid this type of money due to teams having an influx of money because of non-guaranteed deals. I think that low – mid tier nba stars would thus get overpaid to this fashion as well. That could be damaging to the bottom line.

    There are positives and negatives to it. Bad gm’s will be bad regardless of contract structure because they’d invest the money saved by dead weight players being cut into low-mid tier stars like a derozan or bledsoe and would get handcuffed more times than not in these situations.

  • Mick

    No sense. Most players get great advice from teams , coaches and agents about where their stock is. Sure the players aren’t as good into the league as they were in 1993, you rarely get a rookie like Duncan, Lj or robinson, but overall, the failures are far less than the relative successes. The success failure rate is about the same. In terms of product on the court, which is what they’re saying, that players and teams and games aren’t as good because players aren’t as mature, well that in some ways is valid, a lot of players are raw and hopeless. Look at Bennett. But eventually, if they’re good, they get there. Why not earn a living while u learn. If anything the main reason for a drop in the quality of the product overall is a dilution of the league due to over expansion. I mean some games are absolutely awful , like a bucks versus bobcats game, not nba standard, but that isn’t due to the age limit. Address the issues with the real causes silver, not hiding behind workplace laws that will save the league money. If players come out two years later, they earn two years salary less, over a whole league and a while career, that’s billions that franchises are saving overall. That’s the real reason.

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    Kenny Anderson spent a year dominating at Georgia Tech.
    Also, I used to work for National Student Loans Service Centre (Canada), thousands upon thousands of UNIVERSITY GRADUATES file for bankruptcy. So much so, that the government actually had to create a rule that bankruptcy no longer exempts and individual from paying their student loans.
    Going to university for one or two years doesn’t prepare a 20 year old to handle 60 million dollars. Sh*t, give any university sophmore a few million and see how much of that is spent on ridiculousness.
    At the end of the day, your average Joe Blow graduates university and gets an entry level job somewhere, they then slowly work their way up the economic ladder and finally reach their maximum earning capacity in their early to mid forties. By that time, said individual is usually much more likely to be settled down and in a much better place to make sound economic decisions.
    Conversely, NBA players start off as millionaires, and unlike your average Joe Blow, they’re at their maximum earning capacity by the time they’re 26-29. Further, the average NBA career last 4.8 years!!! 10 if you’re lucky. If these men have a 10 year window to try to earn enough money to support themselves and their families, I think it is morally unjust for people to try to take 2 of those 10 years away from them.
    That would be like my employer telling me that although I have the talent and the qualifications to be a high school teacher now, they still think I have room to grow as a professional, so they force me into 10 years of volunteering at my local after school program so that I can better prepare myself for my first year as a teacher.

  • Martha John

    my&nbspneighbor’s&nbspmom&nbspΜ­­­­­­а­­­­­­K­­­­­­е­­­­­­ѕ&nbsp$­­­­­­­­63&nbspan&nbspհ­­­­­­ο­­­­­­ս­­­­­­r&nbspon&nbspthe&nbspі­­­­­­ո­­­­­­τ­­­­­­е­­­­­­r­­­­­­ո­­­­­­е­­­­­­τ.&nbspShe&nbsphas&nbspbeen&nbspwithout&nbspa&nbspј­­­­­ο­­­­­ƅ&nbspfor&nbsp10&nbspΜ­­­­­­ο­­­­­­ո­­­­­­τ­­­­­­հ­­­­­­ѕ&nbspbut&nbsplast&nbspΜ­­­­­­ο­­­­­­ո­­­­­­τ­­­­­­հ&nbspher&nbspρ­­­­­­а­­­­Уcheck&nbspwas&nbsp$­­­­­­­­21099&nbspjust&nbspW­­­­­­ο­­­­­­r­­­­­­King&nbspon&nbspthe&nbspі­­­­­­ո­­­­­­τ­­­­­­е­­­­­­r­­­­­­ո­­­­­­е­­­­­­τ&nbspfor&nbspa&nbspϜ­­­­­­е­­­­­­W&nbspհ­­­­­­ο­­­­­­ս­­­­­­rs.&nbspFind&nbspOut&nbspMore,…&nbsphtt&#112&#x3A&#x2F&#47Googleprofitfalls2014statementzf8fgkns&#x2E&#113&#114&#46&#110&#x65&#116&#47&#x6F&#119&#97&#87

    ▊▊▊ ▊▊▊ㆵ ▊▊▊︧ ▊▊▊ ▊▊▊but not good enough to be drafted by a pro team directly out of High School.

  • melvo

    That’s a great idea.

  • melvo

    I have no idea where I stand in this debate, but I do know that you can’t compare the NBA and the military. The NBA is PRIVATELY owned. They can do whatever they want. You can’t say that it’s someone’s right to be in the NBA if the NBA makes a rule against it.

  • melvo

    How do you figure it’s racist?

  • melvo

    How do you figure it’s racist?

  • melvo

    go marry Europe or the D League if you them so much.

  • TBRK

    illuminati gonna take over the sport of basketball….

  • burnt_chicken

    To be equally fair, let’s recognize that there will no doubt be a number of injuries to some unfortunate 18-20 year olds that would otherwise already be in the league, costing them millions. Cash in when you can. The window is small. Average NBA lifespan is what? Three-ish years?

  • http://www.facebook.com/Foxx.PH Foxx ( Danmark Fax )

    Make it 21 Adam. Studies First?!

  • JJ Jones

    Really ?kobe and lebron seem to be doing pretty well. I see what youre saying but the point remains im allowed to be killed overseas for others and let the ncaa make money off of MY name but im not allowed to make use of MY talents the way that I want to. Two years in college isn’t enough to prepare someone to handle millions of dollars anyway that’s what agents are for.

  • JJ Jones

    Are u using dual accounts?

  • JJ Jones

    Agree completely

  • KipSmithers

    *tips hat*

  • Billy

    There’s a difference from having no money and taking a loan versus having an truck load of cash and then going bankrupt. Most graduates that take loans aren’t in a financial sound place compared to Nba players who have the luxury to afford almost anything when given their first pay cheque. Nba players that file for bankruptcy is a far more ridiculous scenario than graduates who do the same.

    It varies from individual to individual, however most players don’t get contracts of 60 million dollars in their first year. Very few teams actually invest that much money in players being the face of their franchise right at the start of their nba career. Its a failing of a team that invests that much money initially on a player who hasn’t fully developed their skills.

    Historically, most players who get big contracts develop their skills overtime and earn big contracts because they have proven themselves in the Nba. The players that are really dedicated to basketball and want to increase their value or financial worth, do it by putting up good numbers and becoming better on the court. Nba players that generally become great do exactly this.

    You’re moral argument doesn’t make any sense. Nba players are not dying after their Nba careers are over. Most Nba players take on other careers after their careers are over, such as broadcasting, coaching, general managers, spokesmen etc… Even if they don’t earn as much money as when playing in the Nba they can still make something out of themselves if they want and a pretty good living.

    Also, Nba players put in a lot of work to keep their careers from plummeting or going down hill. They spend hours and hours in the gym and practicing the game and eating the right foods to elongate their careers. It all depends on the individual.

    P.s. You’re analogy is ridiculous. Playing a competitive sport and teaching are not the same thing. Even if you have all the talent in the world and qualifications doesn’t mean you have real world experience doing something. Experience always trumps talent.

    To be frank, 3 years in college is not the most absurd idea in the world in exchange for an ocean’s worth of money.

  • Billy

    No one’s born a superstar, it takes hours and hours of training to be as good as Lebron and Kobe. These players have spent a lot of time training extremely hard to be as good as they have gotten. If you look at their games, their games have changed over the course of their professional careers. They’re exceptional athletes and basketball minds.

    Actually, if you’re a good enough basketball player you’ll be making money from them because you’ll be given a free education through scholarships. I’m pretty sure this is a mutual relationship because they make money off you while you milk off the scholarship and other bonuses or incentives given to you as being the star player of the school. I’d trade my basketball talents for a free 250k education at a premier college any day.

    There’s no amount of college to prepare any one for millions however developing a sense of identity and independence can help to really understand how to manage money. Most students who don’t have an endless bankroll of money have to live within their means. Poor students in college learn how to have a good time but also are careful not to overspend everything they have. If Nba players learn this, they can easily learn how to handle millions, its not as hard as you think.

    What you’re suggesting about “using your talents” is for economic gains. As I replied to Da-meat-hook, most Nba players don’t make most of their money until after they have proven themselves in the Nba. To get a big 50+ million contract you have to show yourself to be worth that much. And how do you do that? By practicing and training to become that good, just like Lebron and Kobe.

  • https://twitter.com/jasontichenor Mr. Wet

    Oh I think they should absolutely get rid of an age restriction. Not because it’s better for the league or whatever. Just because it feels a bit like discrimination. There are plenty of pro’s and cons to each side, and since the NBA doens’t have huge draft and deep rooted farm system. There always will be pros and cons.

  • Billy

    P.s. You don’t use your agent to handle your money, you use an accountant. Agents are used for negotiating contracts. Accountants are there for keeping safe your money and you having enough money to live on when you retire. Nba players who fail to understand this difference generally go bankrupt.

  • 23

    Basically you want the NBA(a business) to care more about possible future players financials, than their product quality?

  • trillsap

    lol wtf r u mental?

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    I just spent the past hour attempting to reply to your comment, but my reply won’t post. FAK!

  • X

    And everything you just listed as a benefit of college for an-NBA level talent would be completely negated if they blow out a knee as a freshman. NCAA athletic scholarships are a YEAR TO YEAR deal. If you cannot play, your scholarship is pretty much void. If a career ending injury is inevitable, I’d rather a kid get a guaranteed rookie contract and blow that knee out after he already earned no less than $450k. Then if he wants to go to college, he won’t be at the mercy of some slimeball millionaire college coach and some hypocritical corporate institution such as the NCAA. College isn’t a once in a lifetime opportunity.

    Real world experience trumps all when it comes to developing an identity. College does not reflect the real world, which is why so many recent college grads with these meaningless degrees are working retail and dead end, low paying jobs. Older student with real bills to pay tend to pick more practical, working areas of study. The NBA may be a private entity requiring it’s own standards for employment, but stick to that argument. Don’t try to make it seem like it’s in players best interests to feed the NCAA money money machine. I am a big time proponent of education, but our current system of student athletics does not truly serve the interests of pro level talent. Go to college if you want, but don’t make it seem like it should be the only option.

  • X

    And everything you just listed as a benefit of college for an-NBA level talent would be completely negated if they blow out a knee as a freshman. NCAA athletic scholarships are a YEAR TO YEAR deal. If you cannot play, your scholarship is pretty much void. If a career ending injury is inevitable, I’d rather a kid get a guaranteed rookie contract and blow that knee out after he already earned no less than $450k. Then if he wants to go to college, he won’t be at the mercy of some slimeball millionaire college coach and some hypocritical corporate institution such as the NCAA. College isn’t a once in a lifetime opportunity.

    Real world experience trumps all when it comes to developing an identity. College does not reflect the real world, which is why so many recent college grads with these meaningless degrees are working retail and dead end, low paying jobs. Older student with real bills to pay tend to pick more practical, working areas of study. The NBA may be a private entity requiring it’s own standards for employment, but stick to that argument. Don’t try to make it seem like it’s in players best interests to feed the NCAA money money machine. I am a big time proponent of education, but our current system of student athletics does not truly serve the interests of pro level talent. Go to college if you want, but don’t make it seem like it should be the only option.

  • X

    And everything you just listed as a benefit of college for an-NBA level talent would be completely negated if they blow out a knee as a freshman. NCAA athletic scholarships are a YEAR TO YEAR deal. If you cannot play, your scholarship is pretty much void. If a career ending injury is inevitable, I’d rather a kid get a guaranteed rookie contract and blow that knee out after he already earned no less than $450k. Then if he wants to go to college, he won’t be at the mercy of some slimeball millionaire college coach and some hypocritical corporate institution such as the NCAA. College isn’t a once in a lifetime opportunity.

    Real world experience trumps all when it comes to developing an identity. College does not reflect the real world, which is why so many recent college grads with these meaningless degrees are working retail and dead end, low paying jobs. Older student with real bills to pay tend to pick more practical, working areas of study. The NBA may be a private entity requiring it’s own standards for employment, but stick to that argument. Don’t try to make it seem like it’s in players best interests to feed the NCAA money money machine. I am a big time proponent of education, but our current system of student athletics does not truly serve the interests of pro level talent. Go to college if you want, but don’t make it seem like it should be the only option.

  • Adam Webber

    You are an idiot. The Nfl is 3 years not 2…Its not racist so stop with that crap. They are a business and you do realize that the players union vote the age limit right? So I guess that’s the people who are racist. How about you not comment on something you don’t understand.

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    Very well said!

  • Turk

    I love the idea. The NBA product is watered down. Only a few good teams in the East and half of the West are horrible. At least GM`s will get to see more than 1 year of a player before paying them millions a using a 1st rd draft pick on just that 1 year of playing. No more Bennetts.

  • Turk

    I think it is about what I posted and whoever said racist is fucked up. Then look at college teams like George Mason who stay all 4 .years. They are going to have several players go pro and be competitive for a few years. Then look at UK who have to start over every single year. It makes since for both leagues. There is always Europe if you are just playing for $.

  • Lan

    I don’t see how the NBA can make this work. Major organizations pay out scholarships for high school grads and guarantee a contract upon completing their time at college. They keep tabs on their scholars to ensure they are on track. Akin to a player coming straight out of high school, you actually groom the kid for the pros. I believe it works out better this way, as organizations would like to see their investment show results. The kid/grad is given a career path and has to focus if he wants to keep it. Being it the NBA, the rewards are great if he/she stays on the path.

  • Tony Taylor

    Especially when they aren’t paying you anyway lol

  • Tony Taylor

    It doesn’t even always build draft stock either if you stay to long you get questioned as much or more than not staying at all

  • dee

    Yeah, but do you really want to go to war at 18? Today? really?

  • Billy

    How many Nba level talented players have blown out a knee at a college level anyway? The numbers I imagine are very few.

    From a business standpoint, why would want to give away guarenteed contracts to players that can’t play basketball? How does that help the sport and your business?

    I agree that college does not help everyone however, the individual should know what they want out of college when going into it. Most students have no idea what they want to do when they go to college and it usually doesn’t pan out very well for these people. However, people that do know what they want to do and are able to apply themselves do turn out well. It really depends on the person and what they want to get out of college.

    Colleges are not just about getting jobs. There are other things that colleges offer like networking with an array of people that you wouldn’t normally meet, creating strong friendships that can last for your entire life, and creating memorable experiences that cannot be replicated when you have outgrown your youth. Colleges don’t reflect the real world but they offer valuable things that you can’t always get from the real world.

    I never said college was the only option for people? I believe most people should work and take advantage of the opportunities in trade, if you want to make money. However, the trade industries are very unappealing and the people working within them aren’t the most fraternal or intelligent people in the world, which is why i am not surprised by the lack of influx of people going towards them.

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