by Rodger Bohn / @rodgerbohn

Not only does CP3 Elite Guard Camp serve as a chance to watch the nation’s top lead guards from the high school and college levels, but it also serves as a coaching clinic of sorts. The game’s top point guard, Chris Paul, took a hands-on approach and revealed a number of his secrets that allowed him to become the master of his craft. CP3 emphasized angles, change of pace and timing throughout the three-day event, with the namesake himself placing a major emphasis on D.

“I can’t guard most of you guys. Well, except PJ [Hairston],” the Clippers’ star said with a chuckle. “I’m not that quick, but the game of defense is easy once you figure out the angles.”

The players partook in five sessions that stressed pick and roll actions, finishes at the cup and opposite hand work. The game’s elite lead guards use the same drills each summer to hone their craft, giving campers invaluable learning experiences to take back to their respective colleges or high schools.

Learning aside, here are a few of the top college players who stood out during the weekend in Winston-Salem:

Jordan Clarkson, 6-5, SG, Missouri, Junior

Scouts and high school campers alike were puzzled when they saw Jordan Clarkson’s name with ‘Missouri’ listed next to it on the roster. You see, he attended Missouri last year, but didn’t play a game having transfered from Tulsa. Well, Frank Haith got himself a good one. Well built at 6-5 and around 210 pounds, there weren’t many players at CP3 who could match up physically with Clarkson. He used his strength to finish through defenders, but also had the offensive skill level to create his own shot and then finish acrobatically at the rim. Look for Clarkson to be one of the better wings in a loaded SEC this upcoming season.

Shabazz Napier, 6-1, PG, UConn, Senior

In terms of straight getting buckets, there was no one better than Napier. He was shifty, drilled deep three-pointers, and was downright fearless on the court. He was able to create space on anyone who checked him, CP3 included. Posting legit numbers throughout his entire college career, it’s now time for Napier to continue to improve as a playmaker to sure up his NBA stock.

Devon Saddler, 6-2, PG, Delaware, Senior

You couldn’t help but see a little Isaiah Canaan in his game. He’s well built at 205 pounds with super broad shoulders, bouncing off of defenders en route to the rim. Having put up huge numbers at Delaware last year, Saddler created his own shot with the best of them and will clearly have a target on his back as Delaware moves to the A-10 for the ’13-14 campaign.

Briante Weber, 6-3, PG, VCU, Junior

A guy who I admittedly did not know much about coming in, Weber was the best defender at the camp, combining max effort with length and athleticism. Once the live action started, Briante finished with both hands at the cup, hit a few mid-range Js, and shut down the dunk contest with his bounce windmill. There may not have been a player who helped himself more in the eyes of NBA scouts in Winston-Salem than Weber.

Joe Jackson, 6-0, PG, Memphis, Senior

Finishing off the season super strong at Memphis, Jackson is a player who seems to be accepting a new role. Donned the ‘King of Memphis’ during his high school days, Jackson was always known as a scoring machine. Overcoming some bumps initially for the Tigers, he rebounded and led the team to the C-USA chip. At CP3, he showed off his blazing quicks, hustled, and hit threes on a consistent basis. Expectations are high for the White Station product during his final campaign, as a legit year could send him to the League.