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Thursday, April 19th, 2012 at 9:40 am  |  78 responses

‘It Would Mean a Lot’ for LeBron James to Win His Third MVP


LeBron James, the leading candidate to take home the game’s highest individual honor for the third time in his 9-year career, doesn’t hide his desire and reverence for the award. From ESPN: “If he wins, he would be just the eighth player in history to win it three times. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is the only player to win three at a younger age than James, who turned 27 in December. ‘It would mean a lot, honestly, it would mean a lot,’ James said. ‘If I’m able to win it this year it would be very humbling knowing the caliber of guys who have won it three times. I remember me being a little, scrawny guy from Akron, Ohio, and watching so many greats either watching live or watching games, knowing and loving the history of the game and seeing the guys who have paved the way for myself. I’ve always respected that. I’ve always respected the talent that came before me.’ [...] James’ case is reasonably strong. He’s averaging 27.1 points, 7.9 rebounds and 6.3 assists per game. He’s also posting career highs in shooting, 3-point shooting and rebounding. The Heat are performing at a slightly higher pace than they did last year in terms of winning percentage. And the team is 11-1 when James plays and Dwyane Wade does not. [...] ‘It would be gratifying to know that just one year removed from what I came from,’ James said. ‘I’m just back to playing the way I play the game, with a lot of fun and a lot of joy and just not proving anything to anyone. Last year I felt I had to prove something to people. I have no idea why. But I got to that point and it took me away from why I love the game so much and I why I love the NBA. I got away from that. This year I got back to my seven years in Cleveland, my four years in high school and when I first picked up a basketball at age 9. That’s why I’m more excited about where I’m at today.’”

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  • Bravo

    It would actually mean something. Kobe only won it once

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    Three MVPs with no rings would surely, even for one as brutally narcissistic as ‘bron, be a hard pill to swallow. He deserves It tho.

  • Shecky Shabazz

    Yeah and Shaq won it once, but both Kobe and Shaq are arguably two of the top 10 NBA players of all time. I’m not saying LBJ won’t get to that level, but the amount of times the award is won isn’t everything.

  • Mooney10

    Mvp’s wihtout a title is not any less of an achievement. Karl Malone, Steve Nash, the list goes on. This doesn’t take away anything from his individual merit as a great player. He is already in the talk and that is enough, Kobe was nowhere near his level at 9 years in the league, even though they play a totally different style. To be on a list like this 3-time MVP is more than an accomplshment, it solidifies his career as a great. They will not be stopped this year, and when the ring goes onto his finger, all this talk will cease to matter. People will then sya he doesn’t have more than… does not matter.

  • @boweezy24

    It Would Mean A lot To Someone Else Too. Ha!

  • majic

    Kobe and Shaq top 10 is highly debateable

  • Troy Dan

    Lebron deserves it, man been putting up some amazing numbers and doing some amazing stuff on the defensive end

  • 23

    The crazier thing is imagine if LeBron stayed in Cleveland….. This might have been 4 in a row!

  • http://www.nba.com Gman

    I dont think he will win. I think the league wants Durant.

  • ponder

    @ Mooney10
    I hope you are joking bro Kobe was just as good if not better than Bron at 9 years in. 3 rings by that time. 27 ppg, 6 apg and 6 rpg for Kobe in year 9….

  • bike

    3 rings doesn’t mean he was better. Kobe’s 3 rings came with Shaq. Their 1st 9 seasons would be comparable if Kobe didn’t have Shaq.

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    I don’t think Kobe and shaq Is debatable at all. The only thing I would really debate Is there placement. I have Shaq 5th and Kobe 9th. Anything outside of top 15 for both Is just straight up blind.

  • http://nba.com GP23

    Man, I think LeBron will win it all this year, it’s his time now. MVP, Championship and Finals MVP. Dude is already a hall of famer, and is nearly at 20,000 points already. Crazy!
    Oh, and Shaq is not top 5 all time. Top 10 yes.

  • http://www.slamonline.com Dagger

    Outside of rings and Finals performances, Lebron has been significantly better than Kobe in their first 9 years.

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    @GP23, I can’t really argue If someone places him In any position between 5-9. But outside of the Top Ten Is just madness.

  • http://www.offthebackboard.wordpress.com Off The Backboard

    To be fair, Kobe wasn’t a true superstar until he was about 21 (2000-2001 season). Had he been given the keys to a franchise like Bron, it might have been different, but he came into a situation where NVE and Eddie Jones were manning the back court and he had to earn his way up. Some people might say he wasn’t mature enough, which could be true as well.

    A more comparable comparison for Kobe/Lebron would be their first 9 seasons starting in 1999-2000 for Kobe, which is when he actually took off. Statistically, Lebron kills Bryant in most areas so he’d likely prevail in that regard.

    However, having watched almost all of 2002-2003 Kobe and 2006-2008 Kobe, the man was a beast at his absolute apex, especially in 2006. He was dropping 40 points on the regular during his 2006 season…now imagine his numbers if he had half-decent teammates that made the game easier for him. Its a shame that a player like Kobe had to waste his absolute prime with Smush, Kwame and Luke. Seriously. That has to be one of the saddest thing in all of sports. He got extremely lucky that Gasol came to the Lakers and Ariza/Fisher panned out..the Lakers were fine with him just rotting away as long as they could get some revenue out of him.

  • http://www.offthebackboard.wordpress.com Off The Backboard

    With that being said, Lebron has deserved every MVP he’s gotten. Especially this one, though I do think the Heat should have a better record than the Bulls considering the historical significance of Lebron’s stats.

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    The fact that Rose has missed like 25 games and the Heat still can’t beat the Bulls In the East baffles me. I think In terms of regular season production ‘Bron has been undeniably better In most areas. It’s worth remembering tho just how good, and how important Kobe was during that three-peat (something that manages to get lost In the shuffle sometimes). His Stats were elite, he was all nba defense by 21 (Bron by comparison didn’t become an elite two-way player till maybe 24-25) and he carried that Lakers team when Shaq was In foul trouble or when his free throw shooting had become a liability. I actually cringe when using such a controversial term but he was CLUTCH. As a regular season stat stuffer and winner It’s Bron. As a almost equal statistical phenom, and more importantly, the proven winner I’m still taking Kobe.

  • http://www.offthebackboard.wordpress.com Off The Backboard

    I don’t think people really appreciate how great of a force prime Kobe was. Its easy to remember the 81 or 61 at MSG, but he’s had games where he has outscored an entire team by himself after 3 quarters (62-61), and stretches of 3 straight 50+ point games, include two straight 60+ point games. In each of these games (when he scored 50+) he shot above 50%, and had at least 5 rebounds. In 2003, he scored 40+ points for *nine straight* games. Just think of how much these feats would have blown up the Twitter world. Again, its a travesty that he wasn’t surrounded by a roster capable of winning in his prime. Ditto for Kevin Garnett (after 2004).

  • 23

    i think people overlook the fact that kobe started his career on arguably the best franchise in nba history. a franchise that has always been known for making great, almost unfair, trades and attracting top tier free agents. and kobe grew up with arguably the best coach ever. and played alongside shaq, who was by far the most dominating player at the time. so kobe had some breathing room for error. as compared to lebron, where it was basically do or die all on his shoulders. im not taking anything away from kobe tho, because i believe when it comes to basketball obsessed work ethic, hes in a very elite class. i truly belive if he wasnt in the L, hed be the same kobe at the parks. working on his game night and day. ive always respected kobes work ethic, but ive also always thought he was blessed to fall into the PERFECT situation.

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    @23 I agree but as OTB said he really had to EARN his spot on that proven Lakers team and then build from there. Remember Shaq never won anything till he had an allstar level Kobe on his side.

  • 23

    @paul, yep. just because a player is thrown into a perfect situation, it doesnt automatically equal success. it takes a special player to take full advantage of that type of situation. hard work.

  • Ldub

    Ever since the 2nd half of the season, its been a race between KD and LBJ. IMO, it should go to LBJ only because KD has had his guys next to him the entire way through. LBJ has been without Miller, Wade and Bosh at some point. All of those are key guys. KD is beast but idk if the Thunder would be able to go 11-1 without RW. Again this is just my opinion….regardless of the fact im a Heat fan…there is no bias in this post. Lebron also makes his teammates better. I dont see that much from KD.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Kobe has never been on the level LeBron is currently on as far as defense. No one who watches basketball closely thinks this, I just can’t believe they do.

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    I didn’t say that Kobe was ever on the level that LBJ Is on now, I just said that Kobe was an Elite two-way player at an earlier age.

  • bike

    LeBron has the potential to be the G.O.A.T.

  • 23

    bike or captain obvious?

  • Mike

    But Lebron doesn’t have the balls to be anything but the anti clutch. You guys can talk stats all day it’s the mind set he still doesn’t have.

  • http://www.nba.com Ray Mothibi

    an mvp with no jewelry, plain pathetic.. Lebron is a great talent, but he lacks the drive of Kobe Bryant, he lacks the killer instict that Kobe has.. he dominates the 1st three quaters and freezes in the 4th.. Kevin Durant is more deserving of the award, his numbers are way better that Lebrick thr Choker

  • http://dada Leif

    Allenp are you a moron?
    Your saying Kobe has never come close to playing defense as well as Lebron? WOW….. Man I’ve seen you comment on here before and disregarded it but man. Kobe could lock people up in his prime. Lebron never even used to guard Kobe until after the 08 olympics. Why do you think Kobe was the guy Coach K used to send to D the best player on the opposing team?

    You’ve lost your damn mind!

  • http://www.examiner.com/minnesota-timberwolves-in-minneapolis/smith-signing-scandal-crippled-timberwolves nbk

    Kobe has never been the defender LeBron is right now. And in the 08 Olympics Kobe asked to be the defensive stopper. And lucky enough, the players he wouldn’t have been able to guard were all on his team :P – Kobe was a great defender for a few possessions every few games in his defensive prime. He got a ton of credit on reputation and because he was “the defensive guy” during end-of-game scenarios. He never did what LeBron does throughout a game, either individually or as a team defender. It’s just obvious. And it has more to do with LeBron’s physical gifts than anything else.

  • MUBWAR

    Fellas lebron has potential to be the goat. when it’s all set and done about 5 to 6 mvps couple of rings (9 seasons of 23 points) will be most of all time about 10 to 12k assists(2nd most behind stockton) 10 to 12 rebounds(top 11 all time) about 2500 steals (top 2 or 3). youngest to reach 1000 5000 10000 15000 and probably by next season 20000 points. No one in the league has those potentials

  • http://slamonline.com The Philosopher

    The King…

  • http://espn.go.com/nba/ Paul H

    Nbk, I agree that Kobe has never been the type of guard-all-five, DPY type defender that Lebron Is now but what I can’t give you Is that Kobe was only good for a few possessions game and that It was all reputation. No way. When he was playing with Shaq, and therefore was not expending as much effort on the offensive end, he was considered elite and justifiably so. He had great technique, hustled and hassled all game, read the game and the passing lanes well and didn’t gamble. He legitimately shut guys down. He went through a bit of a rough spell after Shaq left and he was playing with D-leaguers but he was still a good defender by anyones standards, If not the lofty standards he had set by that stage.

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    He wasn’t tasked with shutting people down for the most part. Except a few possessions normally at the end of games. For the most part Rick Fox and Brian Shaw drew the key match-ups. I didn’t say Kobe Got all his credit off of reputation, but a lot of it was. I mean you can have your opinion about Kobe being a stopper, but if you actually go bak and watch, that wasn’t really his responsibility. In 02-03 I believe it was, that was the season where he had to do the most on that end, but he was never like basketballs version of a shut-down corner or anything like that.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    Yes, Bron is the overall more capable, versatile, defender today over prime Kobe.
    Paul H is correct though, in saying that it’s crazy to act like Kobe was an occasionally great defender. If you are going off the standard of other offense first based superstars, Kobe is among the best. He was a ball hawker 2001-2005. He played stellar defense over those years. He drifted from that to being just good from 2006-2008. Now he is average due to his escaping athleticism.

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    I never said he wasnt a very good defender. He just wasn’t a “stopper” – he was never tasked with that responsibility. That’s all I am saying. The difference between him and LeBron is mainly physical. That and LeBron has more responsibility on defense. Not taking anything from Kobe, it’s just how it was. And obviously
    For the better considering how much success the Lakers have had.

  • http://nba.com GP23

    The best defensive display Kobe ever put on was when he shut-down T-Mac in like ’04. Tracy was going off, and the Magic were killin’ the Lakers until Kobe stepped up. Through Kobe’s great defensive work, the Lakers clawed back for the win. Surely, a lot of y’all remember that game right?

  • Rik Smits Mullet

    cosign GP23
    its time lebron its time. Lets go.
    As an lbj fan its nice to see people watching lebron play again. Not just focusing on hating him and just watch him play the game.

  • http://slamonline.com The Philosopher

    Larry Hughes – 40
    Allan Houston – 53
    Gilbert Arenas – 60
    Ray Allen – 8 threes

  • Rainman

    I swear this was a LeBron post? Why does Kobe come up everyyy singleee timeeeeee?

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Lief
    Continue to disregard me. I’m not interested in arguing with any more idiots. My docket is full.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Paul H
    Come on man. On a team with Rick Fox, Brian Shaw and Derek Fisher, you think Kobe was the designated defensive stopper?
    What about with Trevor Ariza?
    Nah man, Kobe, like NBK said, locked up a few cat a few times and played solid, sound defense all game. But he also regularly got torched. He wasn’t switching over to elite point guards to lock them down. Tyronn Lue and Fisher struggled with Iverson. Kobe took Aaron Mckie and his bum ankle.
    Derek Fisher had to handle Mike Bibby. Fox had to handle Peja. Kobe guarded Doug Christie.
    Kobe wasn’t guarding Manu. He wasn’t guarding Tony Parker.
    He wasn’t guarding John Stockton or Jeff Hornacek.
    Against the Pacers he wasn’t even chasing Reggie Miller around all game. Just part of the game. He sure didn’t lock up Jason Kidd. Not at all.
    Where was he on Chauncey, the NBA Final MVP in 2004? Why was he guarding Raja Bell and not STeve Nash?
    He is cool with players with obvious weaknesses in their games. But he didn’t chase Ray Allen and he didn’t lock up Paul Pierce in either series.
    Dude is very good, not elite. Elite is locking the best player down on the other or at least making his life very difficult.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    And this thing about the “offensive load” is some new stuff.
    When Mike was young he carried the offensive load of being a supernatural scorer AND locked up the best player. It wasn’t until Pippen came that he gave up that latter duty.
    What about Joe Dumars? First or second best scorer on his squad and he was tasked with also guarding Michael Jeffrey Jordan!

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    If we’re just talking defensive versatility, how would y’all rank Rodman, Pip, and Lebron in order?

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    Versatility? Rodman, Pippen, LeBron. But the separation in terms of versatility is minimal.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    Your right on many many things you posted there AP. I disagree on a certain couple things though. One being, that you don’t want Kobe being your ball stopper. Phil Jackson knew this very well. Kobe when tasked with being the defensive ball stopper had his offensive game suffer. He played as hard as he possibly could on D when asked to. Which resulted in him being quite fatigued on both ends by expelling so much energy.
    Also, he is(/more so was) absolutely capable of 100% locking up someone. He is a phenomenal defender from a tactical point of view. He has great footwork defensively, very quick hands, decent rim protection, and great post defense. He is pretty well rounded defensively. There is nothing he suffers at defensively except for guarding players that are just to fast for him. When he gets schooled it’s by someone that should be schooling who ever is front of them.
    You say he didn’t chase Ray or lock down Pierce. True. He shouldn’t have been. Pierce was a perfect match up for Ariza and Artest. Fisher was the much better choice for having chase Ray Allen around all game. Ray can jump and shoot over anyone so Kobe’s length wouldn’t have mattered. Ray didn’t take Fisher to the post and use that to his advantage. It was clearly best for Kobe to try to slow down Rondo and make his PG duties difficult which he did.
    My points summed up mainly being just that you don’t want Kobe being your main defensive guy. Not because he can’t be. Because he can. But mostly it’s due to his needed 100% effort on the offensive end.
    Click my name if you want to watch Kobe play great fundamental defense. The video doesn’t prove anything, other than that he is a great defender when it’s put upon him.
    You bring up Michael Jordan. Why? MJ was the better offensive, and defensive player, and athlete over all. We all know this…… Your point?

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Lakeshow
    Where is your evidence that Kobe was capable of 100 percent locking up a great scorer for an entire game or series?
    There is no evidence this is true. Absolutely none. In every Finals and playoffs series Kobe has never been tasked with doing this.
    And his offense would not have suffered as much as you assume, it just wouldn’t have. Plenty of other superstars have had that duty. LeBron is tasked with it often.
    Why is Kobe suddenly unable to do it?
    And while nobody is LeBron physically, Kobe had elite athletic ability for much of career. Just wanted to discuss that people.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    And Pierce destroyed Ariza. And Ray was the second best player in the series.
    Boston had the two best players in the series on their squad that year, and Kobe didn’t guard either one. Then, he doesn’t guard either one in the rematch instead focusing on Rondo.
    And my point was that it’s quite possible to carry a heavy offensive load and be a stellar defender on the other team’s best player or a serious scoring option.
    Sidney Montcrief did it.
    Jordan did it.
    LeBron does it.
    Garnett and Duncan both have done it damn near their entire careers!
    Tim Duncan had the Spurs offense ran through him and then had to go down the floor and guard Shaq. And he guarded Shaq better than anyone else in the history of the League. Period.
    You can be a force on both ends. It’s very, very possible. Difficult, but possible.

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    Co-sign Allenp on the MJ reference, I remember Kenny Smith saying that the Rockets wouldn’t run an offensive play on MJ’s side, that defensively, MJ literally cut the court in half for opposing teams.

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    nbk, I agree with your ranking. All three can do an admirable job guarding 1-4 but Rodman’s ability to do a serviceable job on ELITE 5s(i.e. young Shaq and in-prime Ewing) is what does it for me.

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    Jordan was the NBA’s version of Deion Sanders.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Well with Rodman he never guarded 1-4 at the same time.
    He guarded threes, some twos and some fours as a small in Detroit. Then guarded 4 and 5s later in his career.
    The one thing LeBron does that other cats don’t do is guard 1-4 on a regular basis. At the same point in his career. Neither of the other two did that.
    But, I would still rank them as OVERALL defenders Pippen, Rodman, Bron.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    Garnett and Duncan were not as prolific as Kobe offensively and it is much easier from an, effort exerted point of view, to play post defense than try to stop a perimeter player from going where he wants.
    Sidney was not the defender nor anywhere close to the offensive talent Kobe is.
    Phil Jackson was the one who made the call to have Kobe not be a defensive stopper. You bring up Jordan and Bron. Both of them are better athletes and physical players than Kobe. That’s admitted. They are stronger, faster, thus better.

  • http://Slamonline.com nbk

    Playing defense in the post is much more exhausting then the perimeter. Especially for Garnett who was tasked with guarding the entire paint an the best post player. The physical punishment takes more out of you then chasing a perimeter player. Come on. Offensively is where Garnett and Duncan spent less time.

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    Allenp, this is true but I also think playing on those “Bad Boys” squads made defending 1-5 unrealistic because they had so many great defenders at various positions. It’s a tough call between Rodman and Pippen, but I think LBJ has a chance to leapfrog both when it’s all said and done.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    Disagree. I have spent equal amounts of time on the post and the perimeter. It’s much harder chasing around and stopping perimeter guys(in the lower circuits).

  • http://www.examiner.com/minnesota-timberwolves-in-minneapolis/smith-signing-scandal-crippled-timberwolves nbk

    So you have equally played post defense in a real competitive basketball environment as you have on the perimeter? Or you mean just in general?

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    I typed out a long respnse about Duncan and Garnett then I read what you wrote about Montcrief.
    That was sad.
    Montcrief was considered a better defender than Jordan in their primes.
    Just sad.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    I have. I’m not sure how the NBA differs. I know guys are bigger and stronger, but so are the defenders so I would have to imagine it’s similar on the scale. Garnett definitely did more than his fair share defensively. He was perimeter and post based so I get how his “post defense” took more energy, but in general post defense in the NBA is easier than perimeter defense imo.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Pull Moncrief’s numbers. Before he blew his knee out in the dark ages of medicine his career arc was better than Kobe’s AND he was the very first defensive player of the year.
    You should have just said you didn’t know that much about Moncrief.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Kevin Garnett, Tim Duncan, Jordan and Hakeem are probably the four best two-way players in NBA history. Maybe you add Wilt and Kareem, but since I didn’t watch them I can’t really say for sure.
    Kobe isn’t even in that conversation man.

  • http://slamonline.com Allenp

    Unless you’ve had a 250 pound man bang into you at full speed, you don’t understand what post defense in the NBA is like
    A constant battle for position, there is almost no rest. You think guarding Shaq is easier than guarding Kobe?
    Hell no. Absolutely not.
    Guarding Hakeem versus guarding Drexler?

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    I don’t at all believe you. Guarding the post is absolutely exhausting. Especially when you consider battling on the boards. I have never met/talked to a single person on a competitive basketball team who prefers playing defense in the post over the perimeter. And the reason is always because of how exhausting and physically demanding defending the post is. So I’m sorry but I unequivocally disagree and don’t believe you about your experience at all. Not really trying to start a big ol thing, just saying.

  • bike

    LeBron is, right now, third in the league in steals (1.9/game) and averages 8 rebounds/game. Those stats alone make him an elite defensive player.

  • bike

    Guarding the perimeter involves more lateral movement and running than guarding the post. But a perimeter player can get a bit of a break when the offensive player doesn’t have the ball. Post defenders get no rest at all since they are constantly using the lower body for positioning and they are expected to rebound.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    Allen, Perimeter players are 250 pound muscled freaks theses days. “Post players” are David Lee, and Pau Gasol. Pretty sure it’s harder to stop Bron from getting into the lane than Pau Gasol from banging you down low on the block.
    I don’t know much about Sidney Moncrief. I knew he was considered to be one of the better perimeter defenders, so I spoke with loose knowledge. My bad, but he was no where in the stratosphere of Kobe offensively so it’s still not a good debate.
    If your going to say Hakeem vs Drexler that’s stupid. It should be Hakeem or Jordan? I’ll guard Hakeem if I have equal size.
    nbk, multiply everything you just said by ZERO. That’s how many f*ck’s I give that you don’t believe I have played both post and perimeter equally. When your 6’4″ playing in the single A league in high school your a big. But I prefer the perimeter. Thus equal times on both parts of the floor. I’m not just a shooter or something lame like that.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Lol so you only guarded smaller players? That’s what your saying? Ofcourse assuming what you just said is true, the perimeter would be more exhausting for you. Did you ever play against competition where you weren’t bigger then almost everyone else? Like college? What you just said makes me think of what would be more tiring for my dad when i was 12. Ofcourse he would rather me try and post him up then try and run around him, i was not comparable physically. Think about if you would rather guard Shaq, Dwight, Marc Gasol, or any Center in the NBA or try and chase around Richard Hamilton. Which do you think would take a bigger physical toll on your body? Being beat up constantly, or doing condiditoning?

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    Think about an MMA fighter and their training compared to how exhausted they get during 3 – 5 minute rounds of fighting….

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    Whoooa whooa whooa whooaa…. Would ‘I’ want to guard Shaq or Rip Hamilton?? Ummm let me think here for a sec. I’m 6’4″. Rip is 6’5″. Shaq is 7’1″ 300+… Hmmm… Tuffy…. Hmmm…
    Now if ‘I’ am Ben Wallace, I want to guard Shaq over Rip. That was strange that you did not understand what was weird about asking someone half the size of another man if he wants to guard him or a guy of his size.
    From what I have gathered you are a shooter and that’s about it. So you would know absolutely nothing about guarding the post. My most difficult post assignments were a 6’6″ Center from North Sound Christian in Mount Lake Terrace. 2nd was a 6’2″ 250 pound Native dude from Tulalip Heritage. Those were the “big” guys in my League. There surprisingly was no Shaq’s… Shocker I know.
    If you could guard a 5’10″ guy on the perimeter or the post what would be your choice? I don’t care to hear your answer. I’m just saying that’s a better question.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    The perimeter. I would always choose guarding the perimeter. Because it’s less physically demanding. You get more rests. You don’t expend as much energy. 6’2″ 250 points was the second most difficult post assignment you ever faced? LMAO – like I said, I don’t believe you know what your talking about at all.
    . You know I love shooting. That’s all you know about me, if you take that as, that’s all i do then that’s fine. I don’t really care. My analogy about Shaq/Dwight/Gasol v Rip was just an extreme example to make the answer obvious. I wasn’t asking who you would match up better with.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    Umm. Have you ever heard of Charles Barkley? He ran about 6’4″ 250. That Indian was crazy good. I’m definitely done talking to you though. For some reason you felt it was a good idea to turn a defensive debate into a personal credential attack. It’s obvious you haven’t guarded the post. As the french say. F*ck you.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    LOL I didn’t bring up personal credentials to try and justify my point baby girl. You bring up a subject then get all sensitive when it’s addressed. But that’s fine, you still don’t know what your talking about. Angry or not.

  • http://slamonline.com nbk

    And honestly, what is more exhausting is based off of your physical capabilities as much as anything. Clearly you weren’t in good enough shape to follow a player around on the perimeter and were better suited to play the guys in your league/division/state down low then on the perimeter. The point remains, you are more active, and constantly working in the post then you are on the perimeter. Where it is more about conditioning then anything else.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    Quack Quack Quack Quack!
    Quack Quack Quack Quack?
    Quack Quack Quack Quack!!?
    QUACK!
    quack…

  • Da-Meat-Hook

    Although I agree with nbk’s stance on post play being more physically exerting, the quacking made me laugh pretty hard. Y’all are some funny dudes.

  • http://slamonline.com LakeShow

    Shout out at Da-Meatyest-Hook around.

  • iknowmybasketball

    the MVP race is tending to sound like more of a popularity contest between the best players in the league imo… Even the Raptors commentator Leo Rautins said during the Toronto Miami game that he thinks Durant should win it because its “his time”. Durant is only 24 and from the sounds of many, he is poised to win at least 5 MVPs. If LeBron signed with Miami with no “1-hour Decision”, he would be the clear cut favorite for MVP this year. Stats dont lie people, LBJ is poised to have his best statistical season in his dominating career and one of the best in NBA history.

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