When unrestricted free agent Ray Allen left the Boston Celtics and signed with the Miami Heat this summer, fans and media howled about Allen’s beef with former teammate Rajon Rondo, and perceived disrespect from the Celtics as the main culprits for his shocking departure. Celtics head coach Doc Rivers proposes another person to blame for Allen taking his talents to South Beach, one that no one had considered up to this point: himself. From Yahoo! Sports: “People can use all the Rondo stuff – and it was there, no doubt about that – but it was me more than Rondo,’ said Rivers. ‘I’m the guy who gave Rondo the ball. I’m the guy who decided that Rondo needed to be more of the leader of the team. That doesn’t mean guys liked that – and Ray did not love that – because Rondo now had the ball all the time. Think about everything [Allen] said when he left, ‘I want to be more of a part of the offense.’ Everything was back at Rondo. And I look at that, and say, ‘That’s not Rondo’s fault.’ That’s what I wanted Rondo to do, and that’s what Rondo should’ve done. Because that’s Rondo’s ability. He’s the best passer in the league. He has the best feel in the league. He’s not a great shooter, so he needs the ball in his hands to be effective. And that bothered Ray. And not starting [games] bothered Ray. I did examine it, and the conclusion I came back to was this: By doing the right things, we may have lost Ray. If I hadn’t done that, I would’ve been a hypocrite. In the opening speech I make every year, I tell the team: ‘Every decision I make is going to be what’s good for the team, and it may not be what’s good for the individual.’ [...] Now, Rivers wonders this: Does Allen have a bigger or better role with the Heat? ‘Ray’s got to do what’s best for Ray,’ Rivers said, ‘but having said that, he’s not going to start in Miami. And I doubt he gets the ball more. But I do think, for a guy like Ray and Paul and Kevin and Kobe [Bryant], it’s easier to go somewhere and do that than have it taken from you where you’re at. As a coach, you’ve got to do what’s best for the team. If guys don’t like it, they’re going to leave. If they stay and don’t like it, well, your team’s going to suck anyway. Even if this happens, you still have to do it. You can’t coach worrying about any individual. You’ve got to coach worrying about your entire team: whether that gets you a championship or whether that gets you fired. I think it allows you to coach free. You’re coaching with freedom because you know you’re doing what you think is right. I always tell my guys: If I’m wrong, hopefully I’m smart enough, or my staff, or one of you guys – because I do listen to you – will tell me that I’m wrong. But not one player ever told me, ‘Hey, I don’t think you should start Avery [Bradley].’”