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Thursday, November 5th, 2009 at 3:11 pm  |  34 responses

Win Exclusive Customized Kicks and More

Courtesy of Crons: Come Ready or Never Start

by Adam Fleischer

Lucky you, because it’s that time again. That time when we hook you up with fresh gear just because we love you, our loyal readers. We’re about making magazines, not merchandise, so, like many of our contests, this one’s a team effort. That’s where we pass the baton to Crons.

For those among us who believe that success at any level is deeply rooted in hard work, focus, and preparation, Crons where it’s at. Created by former Pittsburgh Panther baller Pat Cavanaugh, Crons embodies this mentality from its founder all the way down to its apparel. And why not? Cavanaugh started his collegiate career as a walk on for a talented Pitt squad and ended up not only earning a scholarship, but also becoming a two-time team captain. That’s not too shabby, and neither is the clothing line.crons3

Basing their products and message off of a “Come Ready or Never Start” motto, Crons has been in the game for a decade and a half and has been consistently working hard during that time while motivating others to do the same. Recently, the brand proved that following this mantra truly does pay off, as they were named the official provider of apparel and uniforms for the Big South Conference.

Crons champions the “Be Ready” concept, so that when an opportunity is presented to you, it won’t be squandered. Well, here’s your shot to show us that you’re ready, because now you’ve got the opportunity to win some exclusive kicks, courtesy of Crons and designer Tyler Way. You may remember our boy T. Way from past creations for CP3 and LeBron, but now the results of his talents can be all yours. With words of inspiration artfully plastered throughout the shoes, Way has created joints that are sure to make others jealous while continuing to recrons1mind you that the sky is the limit.

Check out T.Way at work on the shoes below

All you’ve gotta do to win ‘em: submit your own story in 250 words or less, and tell us how you use that special Crons mentality to reach your basketball goals. How did you turn hate into motivation?  How did you overcome adversity to become even a stronger player? What sacrifices did you make?

The very best tale wins the pair, but we’ve got five more winners that will also get hooked up. The second place package includes a hoodie and sweatpants made of 100% polyester pleated material, short and long sleeve training shirts, workout shorts and a duffel bag.

perf-hoodie

Just hit up our comment section below to tell us your story and why you should win, and remember to use a valid email address when you sign in to comment. We’ll pick winners next Thursday, Nov. 12. Good luck!

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  • http://slamonline.com Ben Osborne

    Love the video.

  • Diego

    When I was in grade seven I was one of the best my age in the city (London,Ontario). I was on my school team and I was allways better than my man. Now I’m in grade 10 I’ve only grown an inch. All the others grew much more. I have not been able to be on any team because of work. All the others have.Tryouts were last week and I’m on the varsity team so… This year is my comeback year and winning these crazy kicks will give me the mental boost that I need to get back up with the best.Thanks.

  • c spence run

    Cut in grade 10 from a mediocre school. Transferred to one of the perennial power schools in Vancouver. Walked onto the team as Junior and Senior, helped the team to 3rd place finish in the province, as the 10th man. Didn’t give up. Basketball is in my blood. Walked onto my college team and red-shirted. Hard work. Perseverance. cut as a sophomore. Still doing work. Two players quit by x-mas, and was red-shirted for the rest of the year. Keep on going. Junior year, walk on, not a lot of minutes, but finally getting court time. League title. I love this game. Guaranteed spot handed to me for this year. I’m here. Keep on pushing, gotta get there.

  • Johan Aagaard

    Four years ago, then i was 16 years old, i was one of the best and most athletic players in my town (Svendborg, Denmark). I simply dominated every game based on pure athletic ability. Whether i was catching a bad alley-oop and turning it into a nice windmill or just blowing by anyone, with my god-given speed, i was getting buckets with ease. But after that season it all turned out bad i was out with a bad meniscus injury and i could barely walk, i went to the doctor and he said it would probably take from 3-4 months before the operation and around 6 months before i could play at that level that i used to play at. Then i finally got back to the court i wasn’t feeling that athletic anymore, the other guys had become much better athletes and i wen’t from my 22 buckets per game to a team-low four. I have been working my way up to 14 ppg now and I feel pretty good; I use the Crons be ready theme because i think whether you’re averaging 20 ppg or 5, you always gotta appretiace and play every game like it’s your last – You never know if you get another shot.

    - Johan

  • Kevin

    “CAN’T” That’s the one word that motivates me and makes me push even harder when I feel like I’ve given all I can. I love it when other players and even coaches will say that word. “You can’t do this, you can’t do that” I say “Why not?” and try to prove all the haters wrong. I may not be the tallest, the quickest, but I put in the most work and the most preparation to get me ready to play. Spending long hours in the gym to improve my game and sacrificing trivial things such as sleep is a small price to pay. The anticipation of people’s reactions to my on the court abilities drives me on a daily basis. The reward of that moment will be that much sweeter after all the hard work and preparation I have invested into this pays off. Sheer determination, grit, fortitude, and perseverance are the values that remind me that things are not handed to you, but you must work hard to take what is yours. As great as Kobe is, he is that much greater than the next guy because he has spent endless hours training and honing his skills that make him fundamentally sound and prepared for those “Where Amazing Happens” moments. I use that as a driving force to let me know, as athletic and strong as he is, he is up at 3 AM every day to prepare and prevent that next guy from taking his spot.

  • http://www.gvreport.com Kyle S.

    We play rec ball every Tuesday/Thursday at work…one of them is a former collegiate all-conference player. Always giving me crap about not being able to keep up…well…been a couple months now, and I’m the only one who can guard ‘em. It’s tough keeping up with some collegiate athletes while I have type 1 diabetes and posterior shin splints, but everyday is a step in the right direction to becoming a better player and competing above my level and beating my handicaps to be one of the better players on the floor.

  • Adrian D.

    Come ready or never start. I’ve been doing what this motto says for about three years. Ever since I started basketball in middle school I dedicated all of my free time to playing the game, studying it and working out to get ready to play. I played in the summer time when it was so hot the tar on the court was sticky and I played in the winter time when I had to shovel my way onto court. Besides trainging I have also been reading and studying the game a lot. I’ve read everything about basketball from the genesis with John Naismith and the peach baskets to the Original Celtics, to the Magic Bird era all the way to the Jordan era. Training is not enough to be good at basketball you also have to read and study it to. I also have even been studying the great NBA plays from the pick and roll all the way to a more complicated play known as the triangle. I have been training, reading and studying basketball and one things for sure I am not going into the game half assed.

  • Adrian D.

    Come ready or never start. I’ve been doing what this motto says for about three years. Ever since I started basketball in middle school I dedicated all of my free time to playing the game, studying it and working out to get ready to play. I played in the summer time when it was so hot the tar on the court was sticky and I played in the winter time when I had to shovel my way onto court. Besides trainging I have also been reading and studying the game a lot. I’ve read everything about basketball from the genesis with John Naismith and the peach baskets to the Original Celtics, to the Magic Bird era all the way to the Jordan era. Training is not enough to be good at basketball you also have to read and study it to. I also have even been studying the great NBA plays from the pick and roll all the way to a more complicated play known as the triangle. I have been training, reading and studying basketball and one things for sure I am not going into the game half assed.

  • Adrian D.

    Come ready or never start. I’ve been doing what this motto says for about three years. Ever since I started basketball in middle school I dedicated all of my free time to playing the game, studying it and working out to get ready to play. I played in the summer time when it was so hot the tar on the court was sticky and I played in the winter time when I had to shovel my way onto court. Besides trainging I have also been reading and studying the game a lot. I’ve read everything about basketball from the genesis with John Naismith and the peach baskets to the Original Celtics, to the Magic Bird era all the way to the Jordan era. Training is not enough to be good at basketball you also have to read and study it to. I also have even been studying the great NBA plays from the pick and roll all the way to a more complicated play known as the triangle. I have been training, reading and studying basketball and one things for sure I am not going into the game half assed.

  • http://www.sonicbids.com doyouwantmore

    I almost never started, but when I did, I definitely came ready. I actually began playing ball in my late twenties, long after the possibility of high-school glory or a scholarship was long gone. I was injured really badly as a kid and had burns over 75% of my body. It took years for me to have enough confidence to seriously pursue anything athletic. And then I picked up a basketball one day and started shooting. And shooting. And shooting. And working on my crossover. And playing in pick up games with kids half my age. And holding my own. Now I work with at-risk youth and the game plays a big part of reaching these kids. And they respect me because they know that I respect myself and respect the game. I don’t tell them this. I show them this.

  • yxr

    This goes way back to when I was 9. I was in the same class as this dude whose dad was the GM of my country’s pro league champs. For perspective’s sake, he was the son of our Jerry West. He had the swagger, the freshest gear, and all the pros knew him by name. Magic came for a promotional tour and he had the chance to play him one-on-one on national TV. It was in the intramurals with both our folks watching, and I led our team to a win. I still remember both our numbers but I’m not even gonna get into that. I was with my folks when they announced that the player of the game award was going to him and not me, and that tore me apart inside, feeling like I let my folks down. Its been almost 20 years since then. I never got to play pro hoops like I first dreamed. The dude also quit hoops after high school. But now, I’m running down a different dream, of working in the NBA someday. There are days that I’m discouraged, seeing how hard it is to get my foot in the industry door. But I’m grinding my way in, working nine unpaid hours each home game, plus more office hours the day before. Sometimes I feel like complaining, but I remind myself, in this game, things are not going to be just handed to me. And I wouldn’t want it any other way.

  • thalilbigkahuna

    I am the first person in my family to ever play basketball. I began in 3rd grade and played in a city league through elementary and junior high school. In junior high my team consisted of mostly beginners, and myself. I did not learn much about basketball while in junior high, and in 8th grade I asked my coach if he thought I would be able to play basketball for the best high school team in our city, Lathrop. He told me he was not sure. The next year I attended Lathrop High School. I would go to open gyms before the season started and not even be able to get on the court. When the season started I tried out for JV, and would have been cut, but the coaches kept over 20 players. I did not get to play in a game that year, I did not even get a uniform, but I learned everything that I could. I began to work on my game, and started for the JV team the next year. At the end of my sophomore year that JV coach told me that he was not sure if I would be able to make the Varsity team. I did, and played Varsity my junior and senior years of high school. I am now a freshman in college. I am pursuing a degree in physical education, and hope to someday become a college basketball coach. I know now that no matter what anyone tells me, if I believe that something is possible, it is.

  • Thunder Dan

    Not matter what team I’m on I get a ton of $hit from the other players. I’m the token white kid for all my AAU teams, and it doesn’t help that I’m tall, lanky, and awkward. This year I played on a premier Memphis AAu team. Beginning of the year everyone jumps on me, making fun of me, the way I talk, and especially my game. They don’t think I can do a thing on the court. And I let their talk get to me. I don’t play, much; I turn the ball over like the stereotypical white kid with bad handles; and they put me in as the “shooter.” Feeling more like stereotype than a player, my confidence tanked harder than my poor Grizzlies do every year. But, instead of giving up on myself, I gave up caring what my teammates and coaches said. So one tournament we only had five bodies, so I knew I’d get a chance. After a 25 point effort (easily 5x my average), I started every game for the rest of the year. Long story short I went from the laughingstock to the hero. 20 ppg on the year… not bad for a slow white kid. Now, during my school season, I’m hearing the same garbage, but I don’t care. I let my game speak from me now. After leading out team in scoring and second in boards in our first scrimmage, I think my game made my point clear.

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  • Ozrock

    31 with bad knees and 20 years running up and down courts has been a fun experience. When your 6’6 and playing center in australia u do what you have to get by. I may not be the 16 year old who averaged 24 and 12 anymore but the 31 year old can still prove the youngsters wrong when they decide to open their mouths and yap. Always be ready and u will succeed.

  • DDB

    I changed schools before the start of my junior year of HS. Being new to the program I was not well received by the coaches who had the core of their team established. There was a league rule that transfers must play JV for a year if you played Varsity at your previous HS. I didn’t get discouraged by this, I continued to work on my game and punish the JV competition. I worked hard all next summer and did well on the AAU circuit. Ready to make an impact as a senior, I got little to no opportunity as the coaches already had “their guys”. All the college interest I received through AAU dwindled to a few D3 suitors. Knowing I was better, I walked on at a D1 program. My freshman year a couple baseball guys were messing with me and I did what I had always learned to do, fight back. This got me kicked off the team. After a knee injury that summer, I wound up at a D2 school. I re-habbed my knee my first year there, watching them go 4-20. The next year I helped lead them to an 18-10 record (at the time the school’s best) and a spot in the national rankings and a conference championship appearance as a senior. I was also recognized as an all conference player in the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference. Not bad for a kid who played less than a minute a game as a HS senior.

  • bobby stew

    Just like Pat Cavanaugh I too was a walk-on. I tried out for my college team (University of Missouri) four times before finally making the team as a 5th year senior. I only played 5 minutes the entire 30+ game season but it was well worth it. I used to run miles in the morning and sprint at night just so i could be in shape and “Be Ready” for my oppurtunity if it ever rolled around. Mysteriously as my senior year came around many of the current guards either transferred or were injured. This opened up the door for me to make the team!!! Hallelujah!!! I am a living example that preperation pays off, even if the odds are aginst you. Somtimes the race is not given to the swift or the strong but to the one who has endured. So you should always train to “Be Ready” for your dreams to come true

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  • burnt_chicken

    i was going to write in, justifiably so, but then I read doyouwantmore’s and i wisely moved to abstain.
    give the man his shoes.

  • ampd

    i’ve never gotten much playing time at all throughout my basketball career. i was always the kid who had potential, but never “showed it.” this is my motivation to keep playing and show everyone that they were wrong to not play me. i can’t tell you how many colds i’ve gotten from playing in the rain, or how many times i’ve run inside with white hands from ballin in temperatures so low the net freezes and you have to poke the ball out after every shot. ive dripped sweat, wrecked my knees from playing in the driveway, and pretty much ensured i’ll need new knees when i’m 40. but i do it all cuz i love this game, and so i can use my final season of high school ball to show what i’m capable of. everything comes down to this; this is my time to shine!

  • Taran

    When I was 12 years old, there would be kids older than me, telling me that I couldn’t ball. I lost all hope of ever playing good and decided to stop. I said to myself, I would never play again. When my grandpa started to see this, he asked me what happened to basketball. I explained to him what happened, and he told me “Are you going to let people make your life choices? You have a few opportunities in life to be your best. Go for it now”! Those words stuck to me. I started to ball again. I was Ready and wasn’t going to let my esteem fall. Next time I went to the court, I played my game. Kids still said, “you suck”! It was going to change. I used this hatred and anger and practiced all day. I breathed and lived basketball. Nobody was going to put me down!
    After a few months, I went back and played those kids again. This time their perspectives about my game had changed. They even apologized! But I wasn’t there for any sorry or thank yous, I was there to play the game. Every step I basketball after that, I remember my grandpa’s word. Basketball has changed my life, and I consider it to be the best sport. To me, It’s more than a game, it’s a lifestyle.

  • Coach Miley

    4 years ago I inherited a brand new school and a brand new basketball program. They had been open for one year without me and they had failed to truly begin build the championship mentality required of a great team. At the time I was blessed with a freshmen named Derrell Swanson. By sheer chance I came across the CRONS brand and I emailed their CEO, Pat Cavanaugh, not knowing he was the main man. He responded immediately and began to help me build a true team spirit and a culture of winning excellence. We are in California and to be sure that all was well, Pat flew out AND flew his Director of Operations out to our new school. They met with my players and Pat took time with Derrell. Over the last few years we have connected 8 other programs to the revolution and I have since become the Athletic Director. We are now an EXCLUSIVE CRONS branded school and our spirit and culture are changing in ways no one ever saw coming. This coming Wednesday, young Derrell Swanson, will be the first Division 1 signee in the history of our small school (UCR). Derrell has been impacted by the CRONS mentality and Pat’s generosity towards our school, our team, and our community. Next week Pat will return to Cali and LHS for the 3rd time in 4 years to speak with a number of other school districts and local schools who want to feel the way we feel about our apparel and our sports culture. CRONS is Lakeside High School and our athletes are ambassadors of the success of a mentality, not a product line. We will never be able to thank CRONS and Pat Cavanaugh enough for the legacy that we have begun at our school.

    CRONS,

    Coach Miley

  • http://997HighfieldRoadBethelParkPA15102 Cass Wisniewski

    At age 10 I was the tallest kid and confident. At 11 I was on a team where I rarely played being devastated after every game. I lost my confidence and was discouraged. The following year I attended a clinic at Pitt. I listened to Coach Dixon talk about the importance of practice. The players taught us at different stations. One station was ‘knock out’ and I won. A new coach asked me to play on his AAU team. The kids on this team knew the meaning of TEAM cheering for each other and recognizing each other’s talents making us a winning team. My confidence was building. At 13 I worked with the coach I had when I was 11. I immediately did not get much playing time. He challenged kids to a daily workout throughout the summer to better ourselves. He put together a program to help improve our skills and develop our bodies. The highschool coach became aware of our workout and invited us to highschool practices. I stuck to this challenge and recently made the travel and 8th grade teams and was the first 8th grader to practice with a AAAA highschool team. Realizing what coaches are looking for, this challenge has made me want to push to be the best. I could have easily given up. I realized I can achieve anything with hard work and practice. I still have work to do but I am on the right track to making average great.

  • http://www.theverdictblog.com Frankie

    As a player, I needed to alienate everything that didn’t matter and purely focus on becoming a better player. The individual effort I put in the weightroom, in the class room, and on the court made me a successful player. I stopped worrying about trying to be Kobe or Lebron and instead I worried about being the best Frankie on the court. After pushing aside all the insignificant worries I created for myself, and became the best basketball player I could be. I made varsity that year and I haven’t changed my mentality ever since.

  • Ball For Life

    As a basketball player, there will be people who want to see you succeed, and people who don’t. As I began to play ball, I started to get better. I would feel like I had what it takes to be in the NBA someday. All of this changed, because of what people said. Come Ready or Never Start. I wasn’t prepared, and let others put me down. Anger hit me, I was mad at myself. I decided to work harder, and forget others who didn’t like my game. I sacrificed after school hours, leisure time, to play ball. Working on my game, getting the feel of the game, pushing to succeed. I became stronger, mentally and on the court. I was ready. I faced the challenges that came ahead of me, and didn’t let them get the better of me. The theme of Crons, is a message, not only for basketball, but for life. You have to be prepared and willing, or just don’t do it. I’m not sure if I’ll make the NBA, but I know that I have the will and determination, to keep trying. Never give up. Ball for Life.

  • Ball For Life

    p.s I think that Kevin should win and if was to win, i would just want the second package.

  • JChau

    It’s never been easy for me on the court. Growing up just loving the game, I started playing since age 6, but was never introduced to basketball camps until age 13. But it was then the doors opened up. Meeting new people. Developing new teammates. Learning new skills. From that point on, I knew basketball would mean almost everything to me. I practiced, practiced, and more practice. I skipped parties. I did whatever I needed to get onto a court and simply just get better. My friends said I was missing out the fun from playing too much basketball. But I told them, basketball is my fun. Basketball is love. It’s the challenges that I meet each time I step onto the court. Push me down, I’ll get up. 6 years later after finding my true love, nothing’s changed. I’m still me. Basketball is in me. Bottom line is, I just won’t give it up.

  • lol

    People say im obsessed all my friends say so. Everyone of them at one point ha said basketball aint life. I always tell them its second after Christ. When Im court everyhing changes, the heart beats faster and when your hands touch that ball it electrifying. Every moment I get Ill try to get some play in even when theres no hoop. I remember seeing an ad in slam one time with rondo being asked how much he loves it? he said sun or rain hed try to get some ball in and hed tear through 8 or 9 “you cant stop to pick up a ball if ur perfecting ur handle” SO everyday i i cant play on a court ill spend 2 hours working on my handles in my basement. I dont care who it is IM playing against as long a I can play im usually th shortest guy on the court cuz im only a freshman but doesnt matter right? its basketball

  • Ball For Life

    Have any winners been notified yet?

  • http://SLAMONLINE.COM/CONTEST derric moody

    i just want da freakin joggin siut

  • Ball For Life

    ya same

  • lol

    wait still? man its been 4 days

  • Joe King

    I’m too good a person to make upa story how i was the man but now i suck so need the gear to be better so i must deserve it.

  • http://slamonline.com Adam Fleischer

    Thanks to Crons for setting this up and everyone for their entries! Congrats to the winners:
    1st Place: Kevin;
    2nd Place: doyouwantmore;
    3rd Place: Bobby Stew, Cspense, Taran and Thalilbigkahuna

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